Toronto Inglis Factory file photo [23462]

Toronto Inglis Factory

Type   Factory
Historical Name of Location   Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Contributor:

ww2dbaseJohn Inglis and Company, having roots as a grist and flour mill machinery company dating back to 1859, did not relocate its production facilities to Toronto, Ontario, Canada until Sep 1881. The factory in Toronto produced war materials (shells and shell forgings) for the first time during WW1. In Mar 1938, the company was awarded a British-Canadian joint contract to produce 12,000 Bren light machine guns, 5,000 for the British Army and 7,000 for the Canadian Army. Production began in the Toronto factory in 1940, and the contract was extended several times. By 1943 Inglis was producing 60% of the total global output of Bren guns (Bren guns were also produced in Britain, India, and Australia). A number of the Bren guns were exported to Nationalist Chinese forces during WW2; a special characteristic of these examples was that they were chambered 7.92x57-millimeter Mauser ammunition for the ease of Chinese logistics. The Inglis Toronto factory also produced Browning Hi-Power handguns for Canadian, Chinese, and Greek use. After the war, Inglis' Toronto facility returned to civilian production. In 1981, the company moved its headquarters to Mississauga, Ontario, and the site was sold off slowly. Today the former Inglis Toronto factory site is occupied by residential and commercial buildings.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia



Photographs

Alice Minge at the John Inglis and Company factory for Vickers machine guns in Toronto, Canada, 1940sFemale worker at the John Inglis and Company factory for Bren guns in Toronto, Canada, 1940sFemale worker at the John Inglis and Company factory for Bren guns in Toronto, Canada, 1940sFemale worker at the John Inglis and Company factory for Bren guns in Toronto, Canada, 1940s
See all 29 photographs of Toronto Inglis Factory



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Anonymous says:
8 Jul 2016 01:34:06 PM

My dad, James (Jim) Ferris worked at Inglis Factory during WW!!. As a young girl I remember the metal pieces stuck in the sole of his shoes. I tried to remove them as I was worried they would pass through into his feet. I have no idea what his job title was but he was a wonderful fun loving man so anyone who worked with or for him were very lucky.
2. shirley silver says:
11 Nov 2016 01:21:36 PM

my mom Shirley Gillete worked at Inglis plant.
It is great to see rhe pictures and read more of the history.
Mom married Howard William Gorle a Dieppe veteren.
Her first husband Walter Peacock died overseas.

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Modern Day Location
WW2-Era Place Name Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Lat/Long 43.6491, -79.3865
Toronto Inglis Factory Photo Gallery
Alice Minge at the John Inglis and Company factory for Vickers machine guns in Toronto, Canada, 1940s
See all 29 photographs of Toronto Inglis Factory




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