German citizens made aware of the atrocities at a nearby prisoners of war camp for captured Soviets, Suttrop, Germany, May 1945

Caption   German citizens made aware of the atrocities at a nearby prisoners of war camp for captured Soviets, Suttrop, Germany, May 1945
Source   United States Army Signal Corps
More on...   
Discovery of Concentration Camps and the Holocaust   Main article  Photos  
Photos on Same Day See all photos dated 11 May 1945
Added By C. Peter Chen

This photograph has been scaled down; full resolution photograph is available here (991 by 704 pixels).

Licensing  According to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



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Visitor Submitted Comments

  1. Ashley says:
    24 Jun 2014 07:42:52 AM

    Can't agree with walking the children through, but the citizens deserved to see everything. Like another commenter said in another pic, the odor of decomposing and burning corpses travel for miles and miles. They knew.

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