A badly battered Japanese B6N torpedo bomber, wrecked before it could be wheeled from its hangar at the Tinian airfield, Mariana Islands, 30 Jul 1944

Caption   A badly battered Japanese B6N torpedo bomber, wrecked before it could be wheeled from its hangar at the Tinian airfield, Mariana Islands, 30 Jul 1944
Source   United States Marine Corps
Identification Code   93215
More on...   
B6N Tenzan   Main article  Photos  
Mariana Islands Campaign and the Great Turkey Shoot   Main article  Photos  Maps  
Photos on Same Day See all photos dated 30 Jul 1944
Added By C. Peter Chen
Licensing  According to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



Share this photograph with your friends:

 Facebook  Reddit
 Twitter  Digg
 Google+  Delicious
 StumbleUpon  


Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds
Advertisement                    Close







Visitor Submitted Comments

  1. Anonymous says:
    30 Jan 2011 03:14:41 PM

    Das ist eine C6N.
  2. Bill says:
    22 May 2011 12:23:43 PM

    Looks like this Nakajima C6N Saiun "Mert" (Painted Cloud) took damage from blast and shrapnel, the design held up well in spite of the damage to the hanger.
    Both aircraft were designed by Nakajima and
    had a forward swept tail the "Mert" could be mistaken for the "Jill"
    The "Mert" was a three-seat carrier-borne reconnassance aircraft about 463 were built later the "Mert" was used as a night-fighter
    over the Japanese homeland, against B-29 raids.
    It was armed with one rear mounted 7.7mm machine gun, two fuselage mounted 20mm, or one 30mm cannon behind the pilot mounted obliquely.
  3. Bill says:
    25 Dec 2011 03:08:22 PM

    Nakajima C6N1 "Myrt" number 21-103 belonged to the 121st Kokutai, two other Myrts were
    found 21-104 and 21-104 the aircraft were
    discovered by US Forces after the capture of Tinian.

    The airfield was built by the Japanese, and known as Ushi Point Air Field. Did you know that after WWII B-29s left at Tinian were later sold for scrap and melted down.
    One C6N1 did survive the mass post-war scraping frenzy, and is in storage at the National Air & Space Museum, Wash. D.C., USA.

    MYRT'S LAST RIDE:

    The last Japanese aircraft shotdown in WWII
    was a Nakajima C6N "Myrt" at 05:40AM a few minutes before Japan's surrender at 05:45AM

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.

Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
News

Random Photograph

USS S-35 at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii, May 1945




Site Sponsor


Current Site Statistics

Famous WW2 Quote
"No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. You win the war by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country!"

George Patton, 31 May 1944