Hornet file photo [1394]

USS Hornet (Essex-class)

CountryUnited States
Ship ClassEssex-class Aircraft Carrier
BuilderNewport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., VA
Laid Down3 Aug 1942
Launched30 Aug 1943
Commissioned29 Nov 1943
Decommissioned15 Jan 1947
Displacement27100 tons standard; 36380 tons full
Length872 feet
Beam147 feet
Draft34 feet
Machinery8 boilers, 4 Westinghouse geared steam turbines, 4 shafts
Power Output150000 SHP
Speed33 knots
Range20,000nm at 15 knots
Crew2600
Armament4x twin 5in, 4x5in, 8x quad 40mm, 46x20mm
Armor2.5in to 4in belt, 1.5in hangar, 4in bulkheads, 1.5in STS top and sides of pilot house, 2.5in top of
Aircraft90
Elevator3 (1 deck edge, 2 centerline)

Contributor:

ww2dbaseOriginally named Kearsarge, the ship was renamed Hornet in honor of the carrier Hornet that was lost during the Solomons Campaign in Oct 1942. Her shakedown training took place off Bermuda. On 14 Feb 1944 she sailed from Norfolk, VA to join the Fast Carrier Task Force in the Marshalls. Her aircraft supported the invasion on New Guinea, bombarded Japanese bases in the Caroline Islands, and supported the landings on the Marianas Islands by striking Japanese bases on Iwo Jima and Chichi Jima on 15-16 Jun 1944 to prevent their aircraft from reinforcing the Marianas. On 18 Jun, Hornet participated in the Battle of the Philippine Sea, as known to the Americans as the Great Marianas Turkey Shoot. After raids on Japanese bases on Guam, Bonin, the Palau Islands, Okinawa, and Taiwan, she then supported the landings on Leyte, Philippines on 20 Oct 1944, and participated in the Battle off Samar by supporting the overwhelmed American fleet with air support. Near the end of the war, Hornet's aircraft raided the Japanese home islands and supporting the landings on Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

ww2dbaseAs a carrier operating near Japan, Hornet was a prime target for whatever air power Japan had left. During the last 16 months of the war, she sustained 59 air attacks. However, her pilots had much to show for as well. During this time her pilots destroyed 1,410 Japanese aircraft and sank 1,269,710 tons worth of Japanese shipping.

ww2dbaseAfter the war, Hornet participated in Operation Magic Carpet that brought American service men back to the United States. She returned to San Francisco on 9 Feb 1946 and became decommissioned there in Jan 1947. She was recommissioned in 1951 for tension with Communist expansion in China and remained generally in the Pacific area on a wide array of missions, including the recovery of manned and unmanned spaceships of the Apollo program. She was decommissioned in 1970 and became a museum ship in 1998 at the former Alameda Naval Air Station in Alameda, California, United States.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia.

Aircraft Carrier USS Hornet (Essex-class) Interactive Map

USS Hornet (Essex-class) Operational Timeline

29 Nov 1943 Hornet (Essex-class) was commissioned into service.
13 Jul 1944 USS Hornet spent the day conducting refueling operations.
13 Oct 1944 USS Hornet launched a reconnaissance mission over the Japanese Navy seaplane base at Toko Bay (now Dapeng Bay), southern Taiwan.
15 Jan 1947 Hornet (Essex-class) was decommissioned from service.

Photographs

US Secretary of Navy Frank Knox and wife Annie Reid Knox at the christening ceremony of USS Hornet, Newport News shipyard, Newport News, Virginia, United States, 30 Aug 1943USS Hornet (Essex-class) laying off Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, United States, 19 Dec 1943 shortly after commissioning showing off her MS33/3a paint scheme. Photo 1 of 4.USS Hornet (Essex-class) laying off Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, United States, 19 Dec 1943 shortly after commissioning showing off her MS33/3a paint scheme. Photo 2 of 4.USS Hornet (Essex-class) laying off Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, United States, 19 Dec 1943 shortly after commissioning showing off her MS33/3a paint scheme. Photo 3 of 4.
See all 50 photographs of Aircraft Carrier USS Hornet (Essex-class)



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More on USS Hornet (Essex-class)
Event(s) Participated:
» New Guinea-Papua Campaign, Phase 3
» Mariana Islands Campaign and the Great Turkey Shoot
» Philippines Campaign, Phase 1, the Leyte Campaign
» Typhoon Cobra
» Raid into the South China Sea
» Battle of Iwo Jima
» Okinawa Campaign
» Preparations for Invasion of Japan

Aircraft Carrier USS Hornet (Essex-class) Photo Gallery
US Secretary of Navy Frank Knox and wife Annie Reid Knox at the christening ceremony of USS Hornet, Newport News shipyard, Newport News, Virginia, United States, 30 Aug 1943
See all 50 photographs of Aircraft Carrier USS Hornet (Essex-class)




Famous WW2 Quote
"Goddam it, you'll never get the Purple Heart hiding in a foxhole! Follow me!"

Captain Henry P. Jim Crowe, Guadalcanal, 13 Jan 1943