LST file photo

LST-class Landing Ship

CountryUnited States
Laid Down10 Jun 1942
Displacement1780 tons standard; 3880 tons full
Length328 feet
Beam50 feet
Draft8 feet
MachineryTwo General Motors 12-567 diesel engines, two shafts, two rudders
Speed12 knots
Crew115
Armament1x76mm, 6x40mm, 6x20mm, 2x12.7mm machine guns, 4x7.62mm machine guns
Troop Capacity150
Boats2-6 LCVP

Contributor: C. Peter Chen

This article refers to the entire LST-class; it is not about an individual vessel.

The LST, short for "Landing Ship, Tank", came about after the Dunkirk evacuation demonstrated a dire need for large seafaring transports for large vehicles. The first attempt at building such ships was done by converting three tankers from Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela with bay doors; they were used during the Operation Torch landings in Algeria in 1942. Meanwhile, experts from both Britain and United States' navies gathered requirements. In 1941, the name LST was born with preliminary specifications. Within a few days, John Niedermair of the US Navy Bureau of Ships completed the first sketch of the design. It called for a large ballast system that could be filled with sea water to give the ship a deep draft for seafaring, or emptied so that the ship could sail very close to beaches to unload its cargo. The design was accepted by the US Navy, then was sent for approval with the Royal Navy on 5 Nov 1941. Almost immediately, the Royal Navy accepted the design and asked for 200 to be built for Britain under the Lend-Lease program. The first LST keel was laid down at Newport News, Virginia, United States, and the first production LST set sail four months later in Oct 1942. From the very first moment, the construction program for LSTs took a very high priority. In some instances, even heavy industry plants inland such as steel yards were converted for LST construction.

The first action that saw LSTs in service was the Solomon Islands Campaign in Jun 1943, and almost immediately they were used in the Sicily landings in the Mediterranean. Although slow and unwieldy, they were tough enough to absorb a tremendous amount of damage. In fact, despite being a valuable target for carrying large amounts of cargo, only 26 were lost in action; of the 26, only 13 were actually sunk by enemy fire. While almost every landing operation employed LSTs, they were also versatile enough to serve in other roles. Some were converted to become repair ships, others into floating barracks for 200 officers and men, while 38 LSTs were converted into hospital ships. In Jun 1944, converted LST hospital ships brought 41,035 wounded men from the Normandy beaches in the first couple days of the invasion.

After the war, hundreds of LSTs were scrapped or sunk, a few were sold to civilian organizations, and most of the remainder were mothballed. 1,051 LSTs were constructed during WW2, 670 of which were built by 5 major inland locations, with the largest being Evansville, Indiana, United States. Of the LSTs exported from the US, Britain was the largest customer with 113 LSTs in service during WW2.

Source: Wikipedia.

LST-class Landing Ship Interactive Map

Photographs

LST-1 underway near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, circa Dec 1942LST-1, probably near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, circa Dec 1942M4 Sherman tanks being loaded onto LSTs for Operation Husky, La Pecherie, Tunisia, 7 Jul 1943LCVPs from APAs Barnett and Monrovia unloaded supplies onto the beach near Gela, Sicly, 10 Jul 1943; note LST-344 and LST-338 in background
See all 73 photographs of LST-class Landing Ship



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Visitor Submitted Comments

  1. Alvin A. Hess says:
    12 Aug 2007 10:28:20 AM

    About the LSTs, I was on LST 357 during the war.reat.
  2. C. A. BUDZIL QMQ1C says:
    11 Jun 2009 07:42:35 AM

    I WAS ABOARD THE ST77 WHEN THE PICTURE AT ANZIO WAS TAKEN. IS THERE ANY WAY I CAN GET A COPY?
  3. Dan Walters says:
    13 Apr 2010 11:24:19 AM

    My father was on an LST in World War II. How do I find out and get info on which ship he was on>
    Thank you.
  4. Dr. T Barnes, M.D. says:
    29 Apr 2010 04:01:53 PM

    My dad was also on an LST as a Lt.JG, off Peleliu and the Paluas Fall, 1944. How do I find info on which LST? He returned with a Japanese officers sword (as many did) ... I am researcing for a book on the subject. Any info would be helpful...Thanks, TB
  5. DCC (SW) Rhett Sease USN RET says:
    8 Jul 2010 06:41:42 PM

    I was stationed on the USS Boulder LST-1190 from 1978 - 1983. I made chief on her and also picked up surface warfare. It was one of the best duty stations of my career. I now volenteer on the LST-393 in Muskegon Mi.g
  6. Anonymous says:
    29 Jul 2010 07:07:08 PM

    My uncle was on one of the LSTs in the second wave at Utah beach on 5 June. Where do I find the name of the LST he was on?
  7. Clark E. Parks says:
    20 Aug 2010 08:57:20 AM

    I was a SM 1/c on LST 740 and have set up a web site showing photos, telling the story and the history of the ship.

    www.usslst740.com

    I hope you will take a look and link it to this site.

  8. Anonymous says:
    4 Sep 2010 05:37:51 AM

    MY Grandfather who recently passed was on the LST 25. IS there a website where I can find a photo of this ship?
  9. M.D. Austing says:
    15 Sep 2010 04:52:38 AM

    My father, G.L. "Bud" Austing, was assigned to USS LST-818 in the Pacific in 1945 and 1946 until she was decommissioned in Seattle, WA. The 818 was built at Evansville, IN laid down 8 Sep 44 by MO Valley Bridge/Iron Co sponsored by Mrs. Roscoe H. Huffman commissioned 9 Nov 44 with Lieutenant j.g. Robert B. Bradley in command. Among other service in the Pacific Theater of Operations, she took part in the assault & occupation of Okinawa from March through June 1945 returned to CONUS, was decommissioned 16 Jul 46 struck from the Navy List 28 Aug 46 was sold to Consolidated Builders, Seattle, WA 17 Sep 47 and scrapped. She earned one battle star.
  10. john says:
    18 Dec 2010 09:37:47 PM

    my father was a pow and left england for new york on may 29th, 1945 aboard a us navy LST. Is there anyway to find out the lst number
  11. Ernie says:
    28 Dec 2010 12:13:27 PM

    My late Father was on LST # 833. He was a twin anti-aircraft gunner,frogman and served in the battle for Okanawa Gunto. I would like to find a photo of 833 and maybe someone else who has info also. Thanks
  12. Ernie says:
    4 Jan 2011 06:18:42 PM

    My late father was on LST#833 plus he was assigned to LCT (6) #1397 and in the group #62. Wish I had wrote down his stories before he passed away. Hopefully someone out there will share info with me.
  13. Anonymous says:
    29 Jan 2011 04:41:23 AM

    When did they start naming LST's?
  14. Valerie says:
    16 Mar 2011 01:18:28 PM

    My grandfather was on the LST-76. He says in 1945 (he has Alzheimer's and Dementia so remembering can be fuzzy at times). I have been searching for a actual picture of the LST-76 and the list of the crews names to see if I can find more pictures. Any Ideas? I have googles- LST-76 the date 1945 his name...

    Thank you for any help,
    Valerie
    (John Hugh Taylor, Jr.'s Granddaughter)
    Kapaula1@bellsouth.net
  15. Anonymous says:
    17 May 2011 10:09:00 AM

    My grandfather was on an LST during WWII. I can't think of the number right off. I'm trying to find more information on the LSTs. if anyone can help me please email me familyhistorydigger79 at yahoo.com. thanks
  16. Anonymous says:
    20 Jun 2011 09:48:05 AM

    My father served on the LST 25. I would be interested to hear more from the person whose grandfather served on that ship and recently passed away. As was the nature of those who served in WWII, there wasn't much ever said about that time. I may have some pictures of my dad with other sailors on that ship.
    arusse@hotmail.com
  17. Alden Whalen says:
    12 Oct 2011 05:33:25 PM

    My brother S/1c Richard E. Clark served on LST 818 in 44-45 in so South pacific.He passed on in 1982. I believe he told me his ship shot down one japanese plane.
  18. Savid Bigwood says:
    20 Nov 2011 12:24:57 PM

    My father, Clifford Bigwood, served on LST 704 in the Pacific.
  19. gerardo botticini says:
    3 Feb 2012 05:35:18 PM

    after WWII my father sailed as merchant captain LST 1104 Samba under panamenian flag to argentina and were sold . Do you have some information abaut american quarterman corporation and this ship?
  20. John J. McKenna says:
    23 Feb 2012 07:47:27 PM

    My aunt's husband, GM1c Walter Baranick who was on LST-314. Survived Sicily and Salerno Invasions, survived D-Day Jun 06, 1944. On the second trip, sunk by torpedoes from a German Schnell Boote (pt boat), died, buried in England. The British Destroyer that picked up the survivors was HMS Beagle.
  21. Randy Johnson says:
    24 Feb 2012 10:19:03 PM

    My father, George Johnson, served as Fire Controlman on LST 704. Okinawa Gunto.
  22. Anonymous says:
    20 May 2012 08:32:55 AM

    My dad was on LST 1146 in World War II. Anyone else who was on this ship, or how can I find out more about it? My dad never talked about his war years. He passed away in 1989. Thank you.
  23. Tom Lacovara says:
    2 Aug 2012 05:11:32 PM

    My father was a Boatswains Mate aboard an LST called the "Gray Raider". I do not know the number of that LST. It had been involved in Kwajlein, Eniwitok, Leyte Gulf, Linguyan Strait. I am seeking the number of his LST and any historic info for this ship. Please help?
    Tom Lacovara Toms River, NJ
  24. Eugene UtterbaK says:
    24 Aug 2012 11:24:56 AM

    I was on LST 940. Went aboard at ship yard in Boston, MA. then to P.Canal & to battle in Iwo JIma and Okinawa and visited Tokyo. What is status of LSTL 940 now?
  25. Suzy Namba says:
    4 Sep 2012 07:21:16 PM

    My father, David Herrman, was aboard LST 727 from 26 Sept 1944 when it left the ship yard to its decommissioning in 26 July 1946. I was able to find the status of LST 727 at the following site: http://historycentral.com/navy/patrol/26.html
  26. Anonymous says:
    3 Nov 2012 02:58:28 PM

    My father sailed from Falmouth England on board LST 336, captained by a Captain Roberts from Texas who had taken troops in at Sicily and Italy. My father, serving with combat engineers, went ashore at Omaha 7 June. He wrote a descriptiion of their crossing and landing in his book, Chappie WWII Diary of a Combat Chaplain.
  27. Scott Lacey says:
    9 Nov 2012 09:23:09 AM

    My Dad, Gerard C. Lacey served as an ensign on LST 818. He recalls the 1 plane shot down for which they got the battle start saying that there were indeed several ships gunning for it. At the Battle of Okinawa Kamikazes were plentiful, so I don't doubt that there was a lot of lead flying.

    He's only ever told me about one casualty, and it was not in battle. A young sailor was painting and a spark from a welding torch ignited the paint. He was flown into Pearl but didn't survive.

  28. Barbara says:
    4 Feb 2013 07:55:48 PM

    How can you find the name off a Ship someone was on in WW11 he was in the Phillipines. He was Richard James Campbell from pennsylvania.my husbands dad. I would love to replace the two medals that are missing if I can find the Ship. thanks for any help, Barbara
  29. Judi says:
    25 Feb 2013 03:52:18 PM

    How do I find out which ship my father, William John Engel, was on during world war II. My son, Bill's grandson, is asking questions for which I have no answers.
  30. Anonymous says:
    10 Mar 2013 08:39:23 AM

    I wose on the LST 626 in ww2 shee carned 4 battle stars.
  31. Jenny says:
    22 Mar 2013 09:05:44 PM

    My Grandfather was on a hospital ship in WWII. I am looking for some info on it. We have a picture of it in San Francisco Bay,and we knoe he was in port there. The name of the ship was the Alkarad (KA8). We definatly know that the name ship number was KA8 because we can see the number on the picture, we are going on what he said that the name was.

    Thank you
  32. David Stubblebine says:
    24 Mar 2013 12:42:48 AM

    Jenny:

    You are almost certainly referring to AKA-8, USS Algorab.
  33. J. says:
    29 Mar 2013 07:11:33 AM

    Hi,
    I am looking for infomation on my grandfather. He was on the LST 175. THat is all we ever knew. I have no clue what he did, and would love to find out. Upon doing research, I discoverd he was at Normandy. Is there anyone out there who can help me? Is there anyone else who was or had a family member on this ship? He has been gone since 1996. He never spoke about the war. If he did it was to my grandmother, and she never said a word.
  34. Patti McGuigan says:
    31 Mar 2013 06:37:45 PM

    My father, Richard Craig (deceased) was stationed aboard the LST 704. I have just discovered about 40-50 pictures of this time in an old album. There are several pictures of what appears to be the entire crew. Is there anywhere that I may donate these pictures? As most of his generation, he rarely spoke of this time frame in his life.
  35. Naomi Seely says:
    11 Jun 2013 11:45:15 AM

    Patti McGuigan,
    Im not sure if you will see this. I would love a few pictures. I only have one picture of grandpa with some of the crew of the LST 704. As with your father, grandpa, Fred (Fredrick Joseph) Seely did not talk much of this time. When he did, it was very little and through choked breath. Occasionally when you looked at him, he would be off somewhere and there would be tears in his eyes.
  36. Norman Marten says:
    13 Sep 2013 09:54:22 AM

    Re: LST 704
    My uncle was CO from August to November 1945 and I have a number of pictures he took. Also a letter of appreciate from the crew dated 30NOV1945 signed by 84 of them. I do not see Craig or Seely but there is a George Johnson S 1/c. I'd be glad to send photocopies of pictures. Negataives long gone. Have to keep the history alive!
  37. Norman Marten says:
    13 Sep 2013 10:00:01 AM

    Further to what I just sent I see that Clifford H. Bigwood COX signed the letter of appreciation I mentioned. (see # 18 above)
  38. Bill Freeman says:
    10 Oct 2013 11:51:23 AM

    My Father Howard Freeman also served on the LST 704 he would love to see anything anyone has to offer that is connected with the 704. He is forever trying to find any shipmates. Please forward anything to my email and I will give to my father. billf62@earthlink.net He has some things I could also share with anyone. Thank You
  39. John Longfellow says:
    16 Oct 2013 07:50:10 PM

    LST-704 Patti McGuigan - Post #34

    I have a picture of your father and my father-in-law (Russell Warner) on an Atoll in front of LST 704. He had very few pictures labeled but this is one he had sent home to his partents. They appear to be friends. I would like to connect further.

    There are 2 LST Memorial museums of which I am aware that might take the pictures.
  40. David Lapinski says:
    6 Nov 2013 06:17:25 PM

    My father, Charles F. Lapinski served on the 704 from picking up on the Mississippi until after the war. I have some pictures and some ships rosters I could share.

    Dave Lapinski
  41. Norman Marten says:
    8 Nov 2013 05:28:55 PM

    Re: # 40 to David Lapinski. Charles F. Lapinski MOMM 3/c signed the letter of appreciation dated 30 November 1945 to my uncle CO John B Dunlap. I would be glad to make a copy of that and send it to you. I too have some other pictures and documents as well.

  42. s wilson says:
    19 Nov 2013 07:27:29 PM

    See 'The Story of the LST 314' on You tube.
    s wilson
  43. David Chapple says:
    20 Nov 2013 12:32:01 AM

    My grandfather David H. Chapple was aboard LST-1 as comms officer from commissioning through 1945. I would appreciate any help in finding crew lists and any pictures that are available
  44. Michael Kruse says:
    30 May 2014 08:44:17 PM

    My great uncle was Leonard "Buster" Halford. He was MoMM 1st class on LST 25. He was one of two crewmen killed when the ship got trapped on Omaha Beach on D-Day. I would love to hear from anyone connected to LST 25. mwkruse@swbell.net
  45. Anonymous says:
    4 Jun 2014 02:47:44 PM

    RE: questions about LST-25.

    Time photos has a picture on LST 25 on the beach at Normandy.

    http://life.time.com/history/after-d-day-unpublished-color-photos-from-normandy-summer-1944/#15
  46. David Stubblebine says:
    4 Jun 2014 08:52:47 PM

    To #45:
    It looks like LST-23 to me.
  47. David Stubblebine says:
    5 Jun 2014 08:49:32 PM

    Re: #45 & #46:
    What's more, I don't think the linked image shows an LST at all. I think this is an LCT, LCT-23.
  48. Nancy Miller says:
    12 Nov 2014 09:43:26 PM

    My dad, Vernon Miller, was on the USS LST626 in the South Pacific. I am looking for any information about the ship or the crew.
  49. Anonymous says:
    18 Nov 2014 10:04:20 PM

    My grandfather recently passed away. We (my mom and i) have been trying to research to find out what LST he was on. We know he was in the Pacific Theater and he was injured when a torpedo hit the ship. If anyone has some information (i know it is not much) we would greatly appreciate it.

    William John Amable

    thank you


    sarah@olaguefamily.com
  50. Rowland Stebbins says:
    27 Nov 2014 09:44:51 AM

    My dad was on the LST 55. His name is Rowland Stebbins and was a Quarter Master from 1943 to 1946. Most of the LST were manufactured by the Dravo Corp. in Pittsburgh, PA. My father is still alive and shares his experience in the WWII. Many thanks to all that served. They are the greatest generation.

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More on LST-class Landing Ship
Ships of this Class:
» LST-1

Event(s) Participated:
» Invasion of Sicily and Italy's Surrender
» Normandy Campaign, Phase 1
» Battle of Iwo Jima
» Okinawa Campaign

Related Books:
» Flat-Bottom Odyssey: From North Africa to D-Day


LST-class Landing Ship Photo Gallery
LST-1 underway near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, circa Dec 1942
See all 73 photographs of LST-class Landing Ship



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