Ticonderoga file photo

USS Ticonderoga

CountryUnited States
Ship ClassEssex-class Aircraft Carrier
BuilderNewport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia, United States
Laid Down1 Feb 1943
Launched7 Feb 1944
Commissioned8 May 1944
Decommissioned9 Jan 1947
Displacement27100 tons standard
Length888 feet
Beam93 feet
Draft29 feet
MachineryEight 565psi boilers, four Westinghouse geared steam turbines, four shafts
Speed33 knots
Crew3448
Armament4x2x127mm guns, 4x1x127mm guns, 8x4x40mm Bofors guns, 46x1x20mm Oerlikon cannons
Armor100mm belt, 60mm hangar deck, 40mm protective decks, 40mm conning tower
Recommissioned1 Oct 1954
Final Decommission1 Sep 1973
Aircraft90-100

Contributor: C. Peter Chen

Originally laid down under the name of Hancock, the hull was renamed Ticonderoga on 1 May 1943. She was commissioned at the Norfolk Navy Yard in Portsmouth, Virginia, United States with Captain Dixie Kiefer in command. Because she was the first of the long-hull sub-class of Essex-class, she was sometimes referred to as the first of the Ticonderoga-subclass aircraft carriers. She departed from Norfolk on 26 Jun 1943 for the British West Indies for training, returning on 22 Jul. On 30 Aug, she departed from Norfolk for San Diego, California, United States via the Panama Canal, arriving on 13 Sep. On 26 Sep, she arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii, where she conducted experiments in the underway transfer of aviation bombs from cargo ships to aircraft carriers, while her crew engaged in take-off, landing, and anti-aircraft exercises. On 18 Oct, she departed from Pearl Harbor for Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands, arriving on 29 Oct.

On 2 Nov 1944, USS Ticonderoga sailed with Task Force 38 to support the campaign for Leyte, Philippine Islands. She launched her first air strike on the morning of 5 Nov, attacking targets on Luzon, Philippine Islands, and her aircraft shared credit for the sinking of the Japanese heavy cruiser Nachi. In the afternoon of 5 Nov, her group was attacked by kamikaze attacks; she was not hit, and claimed two kills on Japanese aircraft. On 6 Nov, she launched two fighter sweeps and two bombing strikes against targets at Luzon; she claimed 35 aircraft kills and 6 ships sunk in Manila Bay. On 11 Nov, along with other aircraft from other aircraft carriers, her aircraft shared credit for the sinking of nearly an entire Japanese reinforcement convoy, destroying all transports and four of the seven escorting destroyers. Between 12 and 13 Nov, carrier aircraft from the group attacked targets near Manila, Luzon, Philippine Islands, destroying the light cruiser Kiso, four destroyers, and seven merchant ships. On 25 Nov, after some rest at Ulithi, her aircraft sank the heavy cruiser Kumano off Luzon and then destroyed cruiser Yasoshima, a merchant ship, and three landing ships in Dasol Bay, shot down 15 Japanese aircraft from the air, and finally destroyed 11 aircraft on the ground. Between 11 Dec and 16 Dec, her aircraft attacked Japanese airbases on Luzon.

On 18 Dec, Ticonderoga was hit by Typhoon Cobra off Luzon by surprise; she suffered no damage, but three destroyers from Task Force 38 were sunk. The group returned to Ulithi on 24 Dec for replenishment and repairs.

Task Force 38 departed Ulithi Atoll on 30 Dec 1944 to support the landing on Luzon. On 3 and 4 Jan 1945, Ticonderoga's aircraft struck Taiwan, though bad weather limited the scope. On 6 Jan, they attacked airbases at Luzon, destroying 32 aircraft that day. On 7 Jan, the attacks on Luzon airbases continued. On 8 and 9 Jan, she was sent to attack Ryukyu Islands while the Americans landed at Lingayen Gulf on Luzon, but bad weather changed plans, and they attacked Taiwan instead. On the night of 9-10 Jan 1945, Task Force 38 sailed through the Luzon Strait and raided Japanese shipping in the South China Sea. On 12 Jan, the group's aircraft sank 44 ships totaling over 130,000 tons off Indochina. On 15 Jan, fighters of the Task Force strafed Japanese targets in China. In the morning of 16 Jan, some of the fighters strafed Japanese airbases in China while the remaining fighters and attack aircraft raided Japanese shipping.

In the morning of 21 Jan 1945, Ticonderoga's aircraft, along with others of Task Force 38, attacked airbases at Taiwan, Pescadores, and Sakishima Gunto. Meanwhile, the Japanese launched a kamikaze special attack on the group. Carrier Langley was hit by a bomb, and Ticonderoga received a kamikaze hit. The Japanese aircraft crashed through her flight deck by the No. 2 127-mm anti-aircraft gun, and the aircraft's bomb detonated just above her hangar deck. Captain Kiefer immediately changed course to prevent wind to feed more oxygen into the fire, and then gave the order the flood magazines to prevent further explosions. After correcting a 10-degree starboard list, Kiefer innovatively induced a 10-degree port list which helped the damage control party to dump burning aircraft wrecks into the ocean to prevent further damage. As the fire was just brought under control, another kamikaze aircraft crashed into the island, causing another 100 casualties, including Kiefer, who was wounded at the bridge. The fire caused by the second crash was brought under control at 1400.

Between 24 Jan and 18, Ticonderoga remained at Ulithi for temporary repairs and to disembarked the injured personnel to hospital ship Samaritan. She arrived at the Puget Sound Navy Yard on the west coast of continental United States on 15 Feb for permanent repairs that lasted until 20 Apr.

After some training at Pearl Harbor, Ticonderoga returned to the war area in May 1945. En route to Ulithi, her aircraft struck Taroa in the Marshall Islands. On 2, 3, and 8 Jun, her fighter struck airfields on Kyushu, Japan. She rested at Leyte for the remainder of Jun 1945. In mid-Jul, a damaged reduction gear forced her to receive repairs at Apra Harbor, Guam, Mariana Islands. She re-joined Task Force 38 on 24 Jul, and her aircraft joined others in a strike against Nagoya, Osaka, and Miko in Japan. On 28 Jul, Ticonderoga's aircraft attacked Kure Naval Base and heavily damaged or destroyed an aircraft carrier, three cruisers, a destroyer, and a submarine. On 30 Jul, her aircraft bombed industrial areas in central Honshu, Japan. On 9 and 10 Aug, her aircraft bombed northern Honshu and Hokkaido, Japan. On 13, 14, and 16 Aug, her aircraft bombed Tokyo, Japan.

After the Japanese surrender, USS Ticonderoga's aircraft conducted reconnaissance patrols over Japan in search for prisoners-of-war camps. On 6 Sep 1945, she entered Tokyo Bay to embark American personnel destined for home. She departed from Tokyo on 20 Sep for the first of several Operation Magic Carpet trips she would make. She was inactivated at Puget Sound Navy Yard in 1946, and was decommissioned in 1947.

On 13 Jan 1952, Ticonderoga was brought back into service. She was brought to the New York Navy Yard on 1 Apr 1952 for modernization which included steam catapults, a new nylon barricade, a new elevator, and the latest electronics and fire control equipment. On 11 Sep 1954, she was officially recommissioned with Captain William A. Schoech in command. In Jan 1955, she conducted qualification trials in Norfolk, Virginia and in early Feb she conducted a post-modernization shakedown cruise off Cuba. She served off the east coast of the United States until late 1955, and then served in the Mediterranean Sea until Aug 1956. On 2 Aug 1956, she returned to Norfolk to receive an angled flight deck and an enclosed hurricane bow. In Apr 1957, Ticonderoga sailed for her new home oprt, Alameda, California, arriving on 30 May. On 16 Sep, she departed from San Francisco Bay, California for Yokosuka, Japan, arriving on 15 Oct after a stop at Pearl Harbor. In the following six months, she cruised waters off Japan and Philippine Islands. She returned to Alameda, California on 25 Apr 1958, completing the first of her first few deployments to the Far East through 1963.

In Early 1964, Ticonderoga departed for her sixth cruise to the Far East. On 2 Aug, North Vietnamese Navy torpedo boats attacked American destroyer Maddox in the Gulf of Tonkin off Vietnam. Ticonderoga launched four F8E Crusader aircraft to attack the North Vietnamese craft with their 20-mm cannons and Zuni rockets. On 4 Aug, Ticonderoga launched aircraft to attack another reported North Vietnamese torpedo boat attack, possibly sinking two North Vietnamese boats and damaging another two. As the conflict in Vietnam escalated, aircraft from carriers Ticonderoga and Constellation launched 60 sorties against four North Vietnamese air and naval bases along with oil storage facilities on 5 Aug. She returned to the United States in Dec 1964, and entered a five-month overhaul at Hunter's Point Navy Yard through Jun 1965. She returned to Vietnam on 5 Nov and immediately continued combat air operations. In the following 6 months, she spent a total of 116 days in air operations off Vietnam, with her aircraft delivering over 8,000 tons of various bombs in more than 10,000 combat sorties. 16 aircraft and 5 pilots were lost during the winter of 1965-1966. After a stop at Sasebo, Japan, Ticonderoga returned to the United States on 13 May, arriving at San Diego.

Following repairs, Ticonderoga departed from San Diego on 9 Jul for training exercises off the west coast of the United States. On 15 Oct, she departed from San Diego and reached Yokosuka, Japan on 30 Oct. On 13 Nov 1966, she returned to the Gulf of Tonkin and resumed combat duties. Through spring 1967, she launched 11,650 sorties. She returned to Yokosuka on 27 Apr 1967 and returned to San Diego for a month-long rest. Between Jul and Sep, she received reapris at Bremerton Navy Yard in Washington, United States. Upon completion, she performed training exercises off Southern California. On 28 Dec, she departed for Vietnam once again, arriving on 26 Jan 1968. Between Jan and Jul 1968, she served 120 days of combat duty, flying over 13,000 combat sorties against North Vietnam and Viet Cong forces.

Ticonderoga returned to the United States on 17 Aug 1968. On 22 Aug, she entered the Long Beach Navy Yard, California for repairs. She returned to duty in late Oct and conducted training operations in Southern California until Jan 1969.

On 1 Feb 1969, Ticonderoga departed from San Diego for another combat deployment to Southeast Asia. After stops at Pearl Harbor and Yokosuka, she arrived at Vietnam on 4 Mar. For the following four months, she attacked North Vietnamese bases and interdicted supply lines. On 16 Apr, after a North Korean aircraft shot down an US Navy reconnaissance aircraft in the Sea of Japan, Ticonderoga was ordered to sail to Japan to bolster US Navy's presence in Japan. She returned to Vietnam in mid-May. She returned to San Diego on 18 Sep. In mid-Oct, she entered Long Beach Navy Yard to be converted into an anti-submarine warfare carrier.

On 28 May 1970, USS Ticonderoga emerged as a new ship. She exercised out of Long Beach for most of Jun 1970. On 26 Jun, she entered her new home port, San Diego, and performed training exercises. In the early 1970s, she returned to Asia to train with Japanese and Thai navies. In Apr 1972, she participated in the recovery of the Apollo 16 moon mission capsule near American Samoa, followed by a similar mission for Apollo 17 in Dec 1972 also near American Samoa. On 22 Jun 1973, she recovered the Skylab 2 astronauts near San Diego, California.

Ticonderoga was decommissioned on 1 Sep 1973 after being found unfit for naval service. She was sold for scrap on 15 Aug 1974.

Sources:
United States Navy DIcitionary of American Naval Fight Ships
Wikipedia

Aircraft Carrier USS Ticonderoga Interactive Map

USS Ticonderoga Operational Timeline

1 Feb 1943 The keel of CV-14, originally destined to be USS Hancock, was laid down at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
1 May 1943 CV-14 was renamed USS Ticonderoga.
7 Feb 1944 USS Ticonderoga was launched at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
8 May 1944 USS Ticonderoga was commissioned at the Norfolk Navy Yard in Portsmouth, Virginia, United States with Dixie Kiefer in command.
26 Jun 1944 USS Ticonderoga departed Norfolk, Virginia, United States for Trinidad.
30 Jun 1944 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Port of Spain, Trinidad.
8 Jul 1944 Air Group 80 and ship's crew in support of the air group aboard USS Ticonderoga were given a day's rest while off Trinidad.
9 Jul 1944 Torpedo Squadron 80 aboard USS Ticonderoga resumed flight training off Trinidad.
10 Jul 1944 The crew of USS Ticonderoga had a day of rest off the ship in Scotland Bay, Trinidad.
16 Jul 1944 USS Ticonderoga departed Port of Spain, Trinidad for Norfolk, Virginia, United States. She was escorted by destroyers USS Broome, USS Simpson, and USS Winslow.
21 Jul 1944 Air Group 80 flew off of USS Ticonderoga and landed in Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
22 Jul 1944 USS Ticonderoga began her first overhaul at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia, United States. Her flight deck was to be reconfigured to add 11 feet forward and 7 feet aft, and her anti-aircraft directors were to be repositioned.
27 Aug 1944 USS Ticonderoga completed her first overhaul at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
30 Aug 1944 USS Ticonderoga departed Norfolk, Virginia, United States at 1407 hours for the Panama Canal.
4 Sep 1944 USS Ticonderoga transited through the Panama Canal.
13 Sep 1944 USS Ticonderoga arrived at San Diego, California, United States.
18 Sep 1944 USS Ticonderoga departed San Diego, California, United States for Pearl Harbor.
24 Sep 1944 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
18 Oct 1944 USS Ticonderoga departed Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
25 Oct 1944 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Eniwetok, Marshall Islands.
26 Oct 1944 USS Ticonderoga departed Eniwetok, Marshall islands for Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
29 Oct 1944 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands and joined Task Force 38 of Task Group 38.3.
2 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
5 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Manila and surrounding targets on Luzon, Philippine Islands; 10 men and 5 aircraft were lost.
6 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Manila and surrounding targets on Luzon, Philippine Islands, destroying 35 Japanese aircraft.
9 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga set sail for Guam, Mariana Islands.
10 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga reversed course and traveled for the Philippine Islands at flank speed; she was located about 800 miles east of the Philippine Islands.
11 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Ormoc Bay, Leyte, Philippine Islands; 3 men and 1 aircraft were lost.
13 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Manila and surrounding targets on Luzon, Philippine Islands; 2 men and 4 aircraft were lost.
14 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Manila and surrounding targets on Luzon, Philippine Islands; 1 aircraft was lost.
17 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands together with other ships of Task Group 38.3.
22 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
25 Nov 1944 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Japanese positions in northern Luzon, Philippine Islands; 2 men and 2 aircraft were lost.
2 Dec 1944 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
10 Dec 1944 USS Ticonderoga departs Ulithi, Caroline Islands with Task Group 38.3.
13 Dec 1944 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Japanese positions in northern Luzon, Philippine Islands.
14 Dec 1944 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for 7 strikes against Japanese positions in northern Luzon, Philippine Islands.
15 Dec 1944 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for 6 strikes against Japanese positions in northern Luzon, Philippine Islands.
16 Dec 1944 Air Group 80 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga flew 6 strikes against Japanese positions in northern Luzon, Philippine Islands; 1 man and 1 aircraft were lost.
18 Dec 1944 USS Ticonderoga sailed through Typhoon Cobra without casualties.
24 Dec 1944 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands together with other ships of Task Group 38.3.
30 Dec 1944 USS Ticonderoga departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
3 Jan 1945 14 SB2C-3, 6 TBM-3, and 12 F6F-5 aircraft of Air Group 80 from USS Ticonderoga attacked Taichu Airfield in central Taiwan; six of the SB2C aircraft turned back after running into poor weather, one of the F6F aircraft became lost and joined fighters from USS Wasp in the strafing of a train, and two of the TBM-3 aircraft got lost and joined another group in the attacking of Suo (now Suao). On a separate mission later on this day, Air Group 80 conducted a fighter sweep over Koryu Airfield on Taiwan; Ensign Philip Manella's F6F fighter was shot down, forcing him to bail out, and his wingman Lieutenant (jg) R. C. Wagg reported that the parachute was strafed by Japanese fighters.
4 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Taiwan.
6 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Japanese positions in northern Luzon, Philippine Islands.
7 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Japanese positions in northern Luzon, Philippine Islands; 4 men and 2 aircraft were lost.
9 Jan 1945 15 SB2C, 6 TBM, and 7 F6F aircraft from USS Ticonderoga attacked their secondary target Heito Airfield in southern Taiwan (the primary target, Toyohara Arfield in the Taichu area, was covered in clouds), damaging the facilities at the loss of a SB2C aircraft of Air Group 80 crewed by Lieutenant Palmer and Aviation Radioman's Mate Third Class Adelbert Ring.
10 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga and the other ships of Task Force 38 entered the South China Sea via Bashi Channel.
12 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga and other Task Force 38 carrier launch aircraft that sank 44 Japanese ships off of Indochina, totaling 130,000 tons; Ticonderoga lost 1 aircraft.
15 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Taiwan, hitting Kaneka Soda Company chemical plant (mis-identified as a magnesium plant) in Tainan, among other targets. 1 aircraft was lost on this day.
16 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Hainan island in southern China; 5 men and 3 aircraft were lost.
20 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga and other ships of Task Group 38 exited South China Sea via Balintang Channel.
21 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga launched Air Group 80 aircraft for strikes on Taiwan; 1 man and 3 aircraft were lost. Later that day, Ticonderoga was struck by two special attack aircraft at about 120 miles southeast of Taiwan, killing 143 men and injuring 202 others. Commander Harmon Vedder Briner took temporary command of the carrier as Captain Dixie Kiefer was injured in the attacks.
24 Jan 1945 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands; Captain Kiefer, the executive officer, and others wounded during the special attack three days prior were transferred to hospital ship Samaritan.
28 Jan 1945 Captain Giles Elza Short was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga. She then departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands for Puget Sound Navy Yard, Washington, United States via Pearl Harbor.
7 Feb 1945 Captain William Sinton was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
15 Feb 1945 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Washington, United States for extensive repairs.
20 Apr 1945 USS Ticonderoga departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Washington, United States for Alameda, California, United States, and then on to Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
1 May 1945 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
2 May 1945 Air Group 87 arrived aboard USS Ticonderoga at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
17 May 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck Taroa, Marshall Islands.
22 May 1945 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands and joined Task Group 58.4.
24 May 1945 USS Ticonderoga departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands with other ships of Task Group 58.4.
2 Jun 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck airfields on Kyushu, Japan in an attempt to stop special attack aircraft from taking off.
3 Jun 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck airfields on Kyushu, Japan in an attempt to stop special attack aircraft from taking off.
8 Jun 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck airfields on Kyushu, Japan in an attempt to stop special attack aircraft from taking off.
9 Jun 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck Okinawa, Japan.
13 Jun 1945 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Leyte, Philippine Islands.
1 Jul 1945 USS Ticonderoga departed Leyte, Philippine Islands and was assigned to Task Group 38.3.
3 Jul 1945 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Guam, Mariana Islands for repairs on damaged reduction gear.
19 Jul 1945 USS Ticonderoga departed Guam, Mariana Islands.
20 Jul 1945 USS Ticonderoga re-joined Task Group 38.3; Air Group 87 aircraft struck Nagoya, Osaka, and Miko in Japan.
30 Jul 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck Honshu Island, Japan.
9 Aug 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck Honshu, Japan.
10 Aug 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck Hokkaido, Japan.
13 Aug 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck Tokyo, Japan.
14 Aug 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga struck Tokyo, Japan.
15 Aug 1945 Air Group 87 aircraft from USS Ticonderoga were launched for a strike on Tokyo, Japan, but the mission was aborted while en route due to the Japanese surrender.
6 Sep 1945 USS Ticonderoga arrived at Tokyo Bay, Japan.
20 Sep 1945 USS Ticonderoga departed Tokyo, Japan with American servicemen aboard for San Francisco, California, United States (as part of Operation Magic Carpet).
5 Oct 1945 USS Ticonderoga arrived at San Francisco, California, United States.
7 May 1946 Commander Warren Ronald Thompson was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
4 Nov 1946 Lieutenant Commander William J. Pendola was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
27 Dec 1946 Commander Warren Ronald Thompson was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
9 Jan 1947 USS Ticonderoga was placed in the Reserve Fleet at Bremerton, Washington, United States.
31 Jan 1952 USS Ticonderoga was recommissioned for the voyage from Bremerton, Washington, United States to New York Naval Shipyard, New York, United States. Captain Paul Wesley Watson was named her commanding officer.
2 Apr 1952 Commander Arthur Turn Decker was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga to prepare her for decommission.
4 Apr 1952 Ticonderoga was decommissioned at New York Naval Shipyard, New York, United States for modernization and conversion work.
11 Sep 1954 USS Ticonderoga was recommissioned after modernization; she was now under the command of Captain William A. Schoech.
9 Sep 1955 Captain Andrew McBurney Jackson, Jr. was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
24 Aug 1956 Commander Harold Crenshaw Miller was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
8 Oct 1956 Captain William Aurand Stuart was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
15 Oct 1956 USS Ticonderoga began a tour in Asian waters, based out of Yokosuka, Japan.
4 Oct 1957 Captain Irwin Chase Jr. (Ticonderoga WWII Navigator) was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
25 Apr 1958 USS Ticonderoga ended a tour in Asian waters.
20 Sep 1958 Captain Wilson McConnell Coleman was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
5 Sep 1959 Captain Turner Foster Caldwell was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
24 Aug 1960 Captain Robert Faulkner Farrington was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
25 Aug 1961 Captain Eugene George Fairfax was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
7 Jul 1962 Captain James G. Daniels III was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
20 Jul 1963 Captain John Philip Weinel was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
4 May 1964 USS Ticonderoga began a tour in Asian waters.
3 Jul 1964 Captain Damon Warren Cooper was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
14 May 1965 Captain Robert Nicholas Miller was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
28 Sep 1965 USS Ticonderoga began a tour in Asian waters.
5 Nov 1965 USS Ticonderoga reached Dixie Station off the Mekong Delta in southern Vietnam and began operations against North Vietnamese forces.
5 Dec 1965 An A-4 Skyhawk aircraft from USS Ticonderoga was lost over the side off Okinawa. The pilot, the aircraft, and the B43 nuclear bomb it carried wer never found.
1 Jun 1966 Captain Martin G. "Butch" O'Neill was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
4 Nov 1966 Captain James Bernice Cain was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
10 Nov 1966 Captain Ward Scott Miller was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
3 Nov 1967 Captain Norman Kenneth McInnis was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
9 Jul 1968 USS Ticonderoga's air group scored its first kill against a MiG aircraft.
23 Dec 1968 Captain Richard E. Fowler, Jr. was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
4 Sep 1969 USS Ticonderoga completed her final tour in the Vietnam War.
21 Sep 1969 USS Ticonderoga was reclassified anti-submarine warfare carrier CVS-14.
24 Oct 1969 Captain William Henry McLaughlin, Jr. was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
14 Dec 1970 Captain Edward Ayes Boyd was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
27 Apr 1972 USS Ticonderoga recovers Apollo 16 astronauts 220 miles southeast of Kiritimati Island in the Gilbert Islands.
14 May 1972 Captain Frank T. Hemler was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
6 Oct 1972 Captain Norman Kenneth Green was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
19 Dec 1972 USS Ticonderoga recovers Apollo 17 astronauts 450 miles southeast of Samoa.
22 Jun 1973 USS Ticonderoga recovers Skylab II astronauts 800 miles southwest of San Diego, California, United States.
14 Aug 1973 Captain George W. Bruce, Jr. was named the commanding officer of USS Ticonderoga.
1 Sep 1973 USS Ticonderoga was decommissioned from service at San Diego, California, United States.
16 Nov 1973 Ticonderoga was struck from the US Naval Vessel Register.
1 Sep 1975 Ticonderoga was sold for scrap.

Photographs

US Navy pilot Ensign C. V. 1944-45 plan for camouflage Measure 33, Design 10a on Essex-class fleet carriers. Of the 17 Essex-class carriers to see service during 1944-45, 4 were painted according to this plan.Port side view of Essex-class carrier Ticonderoga receiving final preparations at Newport News Naval Shipyard before being delivered to the US Navy, Newport News, Virginia, Untied States, Apr 22, 1944.Starboard bow view of USS Ticonderoga at Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, Untied States, May 1944.
See all 90 photographs of Aircraft Carrier USS Ticonderoga

Maps

Post-mission map of the Air Group 80 of USS Ticonderoga 3 Jan 1945 attack on Taichu Airfield, central TaiwanHand-drawn map of Air Group 80 of USS Ticonderoga 9 Jan 1945 attack on Heito Airfield, southern TaiwanHand-drawn post-raid map of Kaneka Soda Company chemical plant (mis-identified as a magnesium plant) by personnel of Air Group 80 aboard USS Ticonderoga, 15 Jan 1945 or later; the facilities were located in Anpin District, Tainan, Taiwan




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Visitor Submitted Comments

  1. David Stubblebine says:
    1 May 2008 05:48:00 PM

    5 Battle Stars in WWII:
    -Western Carolines - Oct 1944
    -Leyte Operation - Nov-Dec 1944
    -Luzon Operation - Jan 1945
    -Okinawa Gunto - Jun 1945
    -3rd Fleet ops against Japan - Jul 1945
  2. Susan says:
    3 Nov 2009 11:12:11 AM

    Fascinating site. My dad was a Marine on Big T when she was kamikazed in 1945. He survived with just injuries to his leg.
  3. Brian Higman says:
    24 Mar 2010 09:05:52 PM

    My Dad can tell me this story like it was yesterday. Im so blessed that The big T held together the way she did. an am very thankful for all those that served on her during that period.
    Son of C V Higman
  4. Russell thomson says:
    22 Sep 2010 01:51:55 PM

    Trying to find any personal that knew my grandfather his name was Gerald Thompson but went bye jay he was a 3 class gunners mate
  5. Anonymous says:
    30 Oct 2010 09:04:08 PM

    I served on the Ti in 1967(ships company) and in 1968(VA-23). A little piece of Big T history seems missing we cruised the coast of North Korea for 11 days when the USS Pueblo was captured.
  6. Kirk Stevens says:
    28 Dec 2010 06:02:19 PM

    My dad was able to tell me these stories because Vern Higman, Brian Higman's dad, saved his life after their Avenger torpedo bomber was hit by AA fire and damaged. Despite his wounds, Higman piloted their plane back to the carrier and landed them safely home. Plane name "Round Trip". Son of E. W. Stevens ARM2C VT-80 CAG80.


    Brian Higman says:
    24 Mar 2010 09:05:52 PM

    My Dad can tell me this story like it was yesterday. Im so blessed that The big T held together the way she did. an am very thankful for all those that served on her during that period.
    Son of C V Higman
  7. Peggy Anderson says:
    16 Jun 2011 08:45:05 PM

    My Father served on the Tico from 1966-1968 on the flight deck crew, and then he came back in 1970-1971. He was Chief Officer Peter J. Horn. My dad would like to talk to some of the men from when he served you can contact me if you would lioke and I will forward for him!!!
  8. Randy Collins says:
    7 Jul 2011 04:07:54 PM

    I am looking for anyone who may have knew Carrol w Collins Gunner Cook and Fuel man I would love to find a list of men who served with him.
  9. karen bombalski says:
    19 Sep 2012 06:55:24 PM

    Hi, I am looking for anyone who may have served or know anyone who may have known my dad. His name is Clarence dale jacox.
  10. maureen says:
    15 Nov 2013 02:56:21 PM

    My dad, a young Marine was aboard the Ticonderoga when it was attacked by Japanese Kamakaze airplane. Dad had a difficult time talking about the lose of lives on that ship. He wrote in his journal and a video tape a few years before he past away with a brief mention and could not finish the details of the aftermath, too many nightmares through the years after to talk it.

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» Typhoon Cobra
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US Navy pilot Ensign C. V.
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