HMS Rodney file photo

HMS Rodney

CountryUnited Kingdom
Ship ClassNelson-class Battleship
Hull Number29
BuilderCammell Laird, Birkenhead, England, United Kingdom
Laid Down28 Dec 1922
Launched17 Dec 1925
Commissioned10 Nov 1927
Displacement34270 tons standard; 38030 tons full
Length710 feet
Beam106 feet
Draft31 feet
Machinery8 Admiralty 3-drum oil-fired boilers, 2 Brown-Curtis geared turbine sets, 2 shafts
Power Output45000 SHP
Speed23 knots
Range14,500nm at 10 knots
Crew1314
Armament3x3x16in Mk I guns, 6x2x6in Mk XXII guns, 6x4.7in Mk VIII anti-aircraft guns, 8x2pdr anti-aircraft guns, 2x620mm torpedo tubes
Armor330-356mm belt, 111-162mm deck, 305-381mm barbettes, 229-406mm turrets, 254-256mm conning tower, 102-305mm bulkheads

Contributor: C. Peter Chen

HMS Rodney entered British Royal Navy service in 1927. Like her sister ship HMS Nelson, all of her primary guns were unusually placed forward of the superstructure. Although her armor protection was less than originally designed (due to the Washington Naval Treaty limitations), she was considered one of the world's most powerful battleships through the 1930s. Her pre-WW2 career saw her with the Atlantic Fleet and with the Home Fleet. During the German invasion of Norway, she operated off the coast in support of the ground operations; on 9 Apr 1940, off Karmøy, she was hit by a German aerial bomb that penetrated the armored deck but failed to explode. After the completion of the Norwegian campaign, she returned to Britain, from where she would guard against any potential German cross English Channel operations and would set sail to escort convoys crossing the Atlantic Ocean to and from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. In Jan 1941, she participated in the failed search for German warships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. On 16 Mar 1941, while escorting a convoy, she made contact with potential German raiders, but no action ensued as the Germans were under orders to avoid confrontation. In May 1941, while escorting the troop ship Britannic to Canada, she received new orders to intercept German battleship Bismarck; action was engaged in the early morning of 27 May, during which HMS Rodney hit Bismarck several times (including one battleship-to-battleship torpedo hit, the only time in history such situation had occurred), contributing decisively to Bismarck's eventual demise. After some time spent in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, then a non-belligerent nation, for repairs, she joined Force H in Gibraltar, from where she would escort convoys to Malta. She returned to Britain in Nov 1941, and shortly afterwards served briefly from Iceland. In Nov 1942, she supported the Operation Torch landings in North Africa. In 1943, she supported the landings at Sicily and Salerno in Italy. She returned to the Home Fleet in Oct 1943. Her final major responsibility took place during the Allied Cross-Channel invasion, during which she bombarded German defensive positions and routes of transportation along the Normandie coast in France. In Sep 1944, she covered convoys going to and returning from Murmansk, Russia. Having covered 156,000 nautical miles between 1942 and 1945 without going through scheduled maintenance due to war demands, she was deemed to be in poor mechanical shape at the war's end. She was scrapped in 1948.

Source: Wikipedia

Battleship HMS Rodney (29) Interactive Map

HMS Rodney Operational Timeline

28 Dec 1922 The keel of Rodney was laid down by the firm Cammell Laird at Birkenhead, England, United Kingdom.
17 Dec 1925 Battleship Rodney was launched at Birkenhead, England, United Kingdom, sponsored by Princess Mary, the daughter of King George V.
10 Nov 1927 HMS Rodney was commissioned into service.
9 Apr 1940 HMS Rodney was hit by a German aerial bomb off Karmøy, Norway; the bomb failed to detonate.
13 Sep 1940 HMS Rodney arrived at Rosyth, Scotland, United Kingdom.
20 Apr 1941 British anti-submarine trawler HMT Topaze was accidentally rammed by British battleship HMS Rodney and sank in the Clyde Estuary, Scotland, United Kingdom, killing 18.
26 Apr 1941 British freighters Clan Chattan, Clan Campbell, Clan Lamont, Empire Song, and New Zealand Star, carrying 295 tanks for Egypt, departed from the Clyde in Scotland, United Kingdom in Operation Tiger. They were escorted by battleship HMS Rodney, cruiser HMS Naiad, destroyer HMS Havelock, destroyer HMS Hesperus, and destroyer Harvester.
7 Jun 1944 HMS Rodney collided with LCT 427 off Normandie, France, killing 13 British Royal Navy personnel.
26 Mar 1948 Rodney began to be scrapped at Inverkeithing, Scotland, United Kingdom.

Photographs

HMS Rodney firing a salvo, 1936A sailor in his bunk aboard HMS Rodney, 1940Chaplain Whitestone of the Roman Catholic faith aboard HMS Rodney, 1940HMS Rodney lowering her Walrus seaplane, 1940
See all 51 photographs of Battleship HMS Rodney (29)



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More on HMS Rodney
Event(s) Participated:
» Invasion of Denmark and Norway
» Malta Campaign
» Battle of Denmark Strait
» Arctic Convoys
» Operation Torch
» Invasion of Sicily and Italy's Surrender
» Operation Avalanche
» Normandy Campaign, Phase 1


Battleship HMS Rodney (29) Photo Gallery
HMS Rodney firing a salvo, 1936
See all 51 photographs of Battleship HMS Rodney (29)



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