Mark 1 Blade

Country of OriginUnited States
TypeBlade
Length171.000 mm

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe Mark 1 trench knives were WW1-era knucklebuster-dagger fighting knives used by officers of the American Expeditionary Force. They were designed by Henry Disston & Sons of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. The initial examples were made by the French firm Au Lion, and later examples were made in the United States by Landers, Frary & Clark of New Britain, Connecticut; Henry Disston & Sons of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Oneida Community Limited. Though designed and produced during WW1, the end of the war meant most of the examples produced went directly to storage warehouses. In 1942, as the United States entered WW2, many of them were taken out of storage and given to Ranger and airborne units of the United States Army and to the Raider units of the United States Marine Corps. While most of the men thought the Mark 1 knives were adequate as fighting knives, many also thought that they were too flimsy as utility knives (cutting wires, opening ammunition crates, etc.). As the result, the Mark 1 knives were replaced in the US Marine Corps in late 1942 by the Mark 2 "KA-BAR" combat knives, and in the US Army in the spring of 1943 by the M3 fighting knives.

Source: Wikipedia ww2dbase




Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook  Reddit
 Twitter  Digg
 Google+  Delicious
 StumbleUpon  


Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds

Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites


Famous WW2 Quote
"All that silly talk about the advance of science and such leaves me cold. Give me peace and a retarded science."

Thomas Dodd, late 1945