Browning M1917 file photo [5373]

Browning M1917 Machine Gun

Country of OriginUnited States
TypeMachine Gun
Caliber7.620 mm
Capacity250 rounds
Barrel Length609.000 mm
Weight15.000 kg
Rate of Fire500 rounds/min

Contributor:

ww2dbaseBrowning M1917 water-cooled heavy machine guns were first seen in Apr 1917, though the concept for such a machine gun was already patented by John Browning in 1901. It was not until WW1 that the United States Army felt the need to arrange a test for this weapon design. They were quickly made the standard heavy machine guns of the US Army, although production delays meant the Browning M1917 heavy machine guns represented only a minority of all heavy machine guns of the American Expeditionary Force. Troops who used the 1,200 Browning M1917 heavy machine guns reported their satisfaction with their reliability even during sustained firing situations. The M1918 anti-aircraft variant was designed also during WW1, but they did not enter service in time for the war. Browning M1917 heavy machine guns remained in use during the interwar and WW2 periods. During WW2, in addition to being used by the US Army, many units were also given to the forces of the United Kingdom and other Allies; the British, in particular, had an acute need for Browning M1917 heavy machine guns at the onset of the European War as a large quantity of heavy machine guns were lost when the British Expeditionary Force fled from France. After the war, many Browning M1917 heavy machine guns remained in American service. The last major conflict they participated was the Korean War. During the Vietnam War, they were employed by both Americans and the South Vietnamese, but in very limited numbers as they were consider too heavy and unwieldy by that time.

Variants of the Browning M1917 heavy machine guns were also built in Sweden, Poland, and Norway.

Source: Wikipedia. ww2dbase

Photographs

Post card featuring Marines drilling with Browning M1917 machine guns, Quantico, Virginia, United States, circa 1918Communist machine gun crew at the Battle of Pingxingguan, Shanxi Province, China, 25 Sep 1937Polish troops on a Sokół 1000 motorcycle with a Ckm wz. 30 machine gun, 3 May 1938Members of a Polish Army anti-aircraft crew posing with their Ckm wz.30 machine gun, Warsaw, Sep 1939
See all 20 photographs of Browning M1917 Machine Gun

Videos

The News Parade: War in China




Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook  Reddit
 Twitter  Digg
 Google+  Delicious
 StumbleUpon  


Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds

Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Anonymous says:
18 May 2008 03:08:06 AM

omg
2. Ken says:
11 Jul 2008 03:37:33 AM

I think M1917 is not good because it need water to cool.If no water,the crew need to get water,it cost time.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.

Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
Browning M1917 Machine Gun Photo Gallery
Post card featuring Marines drilling with Browning M1917 machine guns, Quantico, Virginia, United States, circa 1918
See all 20 photographs of Browning M1917 Machine Gun




Famous WW2 Quote
"All that silly talk about the advance of science and such leaves me cold. Give me peace and a retarded science."

Thomas Dodd, late 1945