27 May 1940

Norway
  • German Luftwaffe aircraft attacked Bodø, Norway, rendering 3,500 of the town's 6,000 residents homeless. 2 British servicemen and 13 Norwegian civilians were killed. ww2dbase [Invasion of Denmark and Norway | Bodø, Nordland | CPC]
4 Mar 1941

Norway
  • British landing ships HMS Queen Emma and HMS Princess Beatrix, escorted by five destroyers, landed 500 British Commandos, Royal Engineers, and Free Norwegian troops at four ports in the Loftoten Islands, off Narvik, Norway at dawn. Operation Claymore, the first large scale commando raid of the war, saw the destruction of fish oil factories (along with 3,600 tons of fish oil, used for high explosives) and nine merchant ships. An unexpected bonus was the discovery of coding rotors for the Enigma cryptographic sysyem found aboard German trawler Krebs. The raiders withdrew without a single casualty along with 228 German captives. ww2dbase [Nordland | AC]
28 Jul 1943

Norway
  • Westfalen departed Bodø, Norway, escorted by auxiliary trawler V 5717 Fritz Homann. ww2dbase [Westfalen | Bodø, Nordland | CPC]
4 Oct 1943

Norway
  • The American aircraft carrier, USS Ranger, despatched her air group to attack German shipping at Bodø, Norway. The Ranger's Dauntless and Avenger aircraft sank or damaged ten ships for the loss of five aircraft. This action would be the only carrier strike to be conducted by the US Navy in Northern European waters. ww2dbase [Ranger | Bodø, Nordland | AC]

Timeline Section Founder: Thomas Houlihan
Contributors: Alan Chanter, C. Peter Chen, Thomas Houlihan, Hugh Martyr, David Stubblebine
Special Thanks: Rory Curtis




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Famous WW2 Quote
"All that silly talk about the advance of science and such leaves me cold. Give me peace and a retarded science."

Thomas Dodd, late 1945