Chengdu Airfield

Type   Airfield
Historical Name of Location   Chengdu, Sichuan, China

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe military base known in WW2 as Chengdu Airfield was built prior to the Japanese invasion of China in 1937 and was previously known as Chungsing Chang, Fenghwangshan, Fungwansham, and Makiashipen. Between Jul 1944 and Aug 1945, it was a major command and control base for the USAAF Tenth Air Force and hosted elements of 312th Fighter Wing between 1943 and the end of the war in 1945; this wing's fighters provided support for local Chinese ground troops, escorted B-29 Superfortress bombers based nearby on their bombing missions over the Japanese Home Islands (until these bombers were relocated to Mariana Islands in Jan 1945), and flew air superiority missions over the region. The Americans departed the airfield on 30 Sep 1945, and the base became closed. The growth city of Chengdu overcame the airfield after the war, with highways and buildings now occupying the grounds.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia

Last Major Update: Apr 2014



Chengdu Airfield Timeline

30 Sep 1945 Chengdu Airfield in Sichuan Province, China was closed.




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Modern Day Location
WW2-Era Place Name Chengdu, Sichuan, China
Lat/Long 30.5292, 104.0647


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