Dostler tied to a stake in preparation of his execution by a firing squad, Aversa, Italy, 1 Dec 1945

Caption   Dostler tied to a stake in preparation of his execution by a firing squad, Aversa, Italy, 1 Dec 1945 ww2dbase
Photographer   
Source    ww2dbaseUnited States National Archives
Identification Code   111-SC-225295
More on...   
Anton Dostler   Main article  Photos  
Photos on Same Day See all photos dated 1 Dec 1945
Added By C. Peter Chen
Added Date 24 Dec 2006

This photograph has been scaled down; full resolution photograph is available here (1,395 by 1,097 pixels).

Licensing  Public Domain. According to the US National Archives, as of 21 Jul 2010:
The vast majority of the digital images in the Archival Research Catalog (ARC) are in the public domain. Therefore, no written permission is required to use them. We would appreciate your crediting the National Archives and Records Administration as the original source. For the few images that remain copyrighted, please read the instructions noted in the "Access Restrictions" field of each ARC record.... In general, all government records are in the public domain and may be freely used.... Additionally, according to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Vossler says:
23 Nov 2007 02:24:38 PM

Another example of the innocent being expolited for political means
2. Anonymous says:
11 May 2009 03:49:06 PM

Thats war. deal with it
3. Caruso says:
1 Dec 2013 02:17:39 PM

Yeah, he was a real paragon of innocence.
4. Anonymous says:
1 Dec 2013 03:29:10 PM

Innocent ...my behind!
5. Anonymous says:
1 Dec 2013 03:48:41 PM

HAW! HAW! HAW! A good Nazi is a dead Nazi!
6. Anonymous says:
1 Dec 2013 04:57:35 PM

It took courage and integrity to challenge the insanity of orders such as Hitler's, and to adhere to the Geneva convention. My Dad fought in Italy during WW2, and came home to his family, a man forever changed by the experience. I have no sympathy for men like Dostler. Without him and men like him, Hitler would never have been able to perpetrate the atrocities that he did. Dostler got what he deserved. Per Wikipedia: "On March 22, 1944, fifteen soldiers of the U.S. Army, including two officers, landed on the Italian coast about 15 kilometres north of La Spezia, 400 km (250 miles) behind the then established front, as part of Operation Ginny II. They were all properly dressed in the field uniform of the U.S. Army and carried no civilian clothes.[1][2] Their objective was to demolish a tunnel at Framura on the important railroad line between La Spezia and Genoa. Two days later, the group was captured by a party of Italian Fascist soldiers and members of the German Wehrmacht. They were taken to La Spezia, where they were confined near the headquarters of the 135th Fortress Brigade, which was under the command of German Colonel Almers. The immediate, superior command was that of the 75th Army Corps, commanded by Dostler. The captured U.S. soldiers were interrogated and one of the U.S. officers revealed the story of the mission. The information, including that it was a commando raid, was then sent to Dostler at the 75th Army Corps. The following day (March 25), Dostler informed his superior, Field Marshal Albert Kesselring, commanding general of all German forces in Italy, about the captured U.S. commandos and what to do with them. According to Dostler's adjutant officer, Kesselring responded by ordering the execution. Later that day, Dostler sent a telegram to the 135th Fortress Brigade ordering that the captured soldiers be executed. This order was an implementation of Hitler's secret Commando Order of 1942 which required the immediate execution without trial of commandos and saboteurs. German officers at the 135th Fortress Brigade contacted Dostler in an attempt to achieve a stay of execution. Dostler then sent another telegram ordering Almers to carry out the execution. Two last attempts were made by the officers at the 135th to stop the execution, including some by telephone, because they knew that executing uniformed prisoners of war was a direct violation of the 1929 Geneva Convention on Prisoners of War. These efforts were unsuccessful and the fifteen Americans were executed on the morning of March 26, 1944, at Punta Bianca south of La Spezia, in the municipality of Ameglia. Their bodies were buried in a mass grave that was then camouflaged. Alexander zu Dohna-Schlobitten, a member of Dostler's staff who was unaware of the secret Commando Order and who had refused to sign the execution order, was dismissed from the Wehrmacht for insubordination".
7. Anonymous says:
1 Dec 2013 06:12:39 PM

Isn't war just great!
8. Cindel says:
2 Dec 2013 02:03:31 AM

According to Wikipedia: "Dostler sent a telegram to the 135th Fortress Brigade ordering that the captured soldiers be executed. This order was an implementation of Hitler's secret Commando Order of 1942 which required the immediate execution without trial of commandos and saboteurs. German officers at the 135th Fortress Brigade contacted Dostler in an attempt to achieve a stay of execution. Dostler then sent another telegram ordering Almers to carry out the execution. Two last attempts were made by the officers at the 135th to stop the execution, including some by telephone, because they knew that executing uniformed prisoners of war was a direct violation of the 1929 Geneva Convention on Prisoners of War. These efforts were unsuccessful and the fifteen Americans were executed on the morning of March 26, 1944, at Punta Bianca south of La Spezia, in the municipality of Ameglia." 15 American Soldiers were killed at his hand, my definition of "innocent" would leave Dostler out of the running as innocent anything. I'm curious what your definition of innocent is?

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