USS New Orleans in British waters on her shakedown cruise, May or Jun 1934.USS New Orleans arriving in Portland, Oregon, United States passing under the St Johns Bridge on the Willamette River, 2 Aug 1934. She was escorting USS Houston which had President Franklin Roosevelt on board.USS New Orleans passing through the open Burnside Drawbridge in Portland, Oregon, United States, 2 Aug 1934. New Orleans was escorting USS Houston (left) which brought President Franklin Roosevelt to Oregon.USS New Orleans in drydock at the New York Navy Yard with crew members scraping the hull, 1936. Good view of the bow section that got blown off seven years later in the Battle of Tassafaronga.
USS New Orleans in British waters on her shakedown cruise, May or Jun 1934.USS New Orleans arriving in Portland, Oregon, United States passing under the St Johns Bridge on the Willamette River, 2 Aug 1934. She was escorting USS Houston which had President Franklin Roosevelt on board.USS New Orleans passing through the open Burnside Drawbridge in Portland, Oregon, United States, 2 Aug 1934. New Orleans was escorting USS Houston (left) which brought President Franklin Roosevelt to Oregon.USS New Orleans in drydock at the New York Navy Yard with crew members scraping the hull, 1936. Good view of the bow section that got blown off seven years later in the Battle of Tassafaronga.
Cruiser USS Chester at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 1936. Note six battleships on Battleship Row and cruisers Minneapolis and New Orleans (New Orleans-class) at left. Note also the passenger train cars in the foreground.Portside broadside view of the cruiser USS New Orleans off Mare Island, California, United States, 9 Feb 1942.Aerial view of USS New Orleans during exercises in Hawaiian waters, 8 Jul 1942. Note all main guns trained to port.Down by the bow, USS New Orleans arriving in Tulagi Harbor, Solomon Islands, 1 Dec 1942. The night before, New Orleans was struck by a torpedo in the Battle of Tassafaronga that blew off 150 feet of her bow.
Cruiser USS Chester at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 1936. Note six battleships on Battleship Row and cruisers Minneapolis and New Orleans (New Orleans-class) at left. Note also the passenger train cars in the foreground.Portside broadside view of the cruiser USS New Orleans off Mare Island, California, United States, 9 Feb 1942.Aerial view of USS New Orleans during exercises in Hawaiian waters, 8 Jul 1942. Note all main guns trained to port.Down by the bow, USS New Orleans arriving in Tulagi Harbor, Solomon Islands, 1 Dec 1942. The night before, New Orleans was struck by a torpedo in the Battle of Tassafaronga that blew off 150 feet of her bow.
Elco 80-foot torpedo boat PT-109 commanded by Ensign Bryant L Larson delivering 96 survivors from the sunken cruiser USS Northampton to Tulagi Harbor, Solomon Islands, 1 Dec 1942. Note the cruiser USS New Orleans at left.USS New Orleans making repairs under make-shift camouflage in Tulagi Harbor, Solomon Islands, 1 Dec 1942. New Orleans was struck by a torpedo in the Battle of Tassafaronga that blew off 150 feet of her bow.USS New Orleans in the Cockatoo Docks in Sydney, Australia as a temporary bow is being lowered into place after she was struck by a torpedo in the Battle of Tassafaronga that blew off 150 feet of her bow.USS New Orleans underway from Sydney, Australia after being fitted with a temporary bow because she was struck by a torpedo in the Battle of Tassafaronga that blew off 150 feet of her bow.
Elco 80-foot torpedo boat PT-109 commanded by Ensign Bryant L Larson delivering 96 survivors from the sunken cruiser USS Northampton to Tulagi Harbor, Solomon Islands, 1 Dec 1942. Note the cruiser USS New Orleans at left.USS New Orleans making repairs under make-shift camouflage in Tulagi Harbor, Solomon Islands, 1 Dec 1942. New Orleans was struck by a torpedo in the Battle of Tassafaronga that blew off 150 feet of her bow.USS New Orleans in the Cockatoo Docks in Sydney, Australia as a temporary bow is being lowered into place after she was struck by a torpedo in the Battle of Tassafaronga that blew off 150 feet of her bow.USS New Orleans underway from Sydney, Australia after being fitted with a temporary bow because she was struck by a torpedo in the Battle of Tassafaronga that blew off 150 feet of her bow.
Diagram of torpedo damage to USS New Orleans sustained in the Battle of Tassafaronga that resulted in 150 feet of her bow being blown off.USS New Orleans in trials off Seattle in Elliott Bay, Washington, United States 30 Jul 1943 following major repairs at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.Minneapolis, San Francisco, and New Orleans bombard Wake, 5 Oct 1943Cruisers USS Salt Lake City, Pensacola, and New Orleans nested together at Pearl Harbor in Berth B-3, 30 Oct 1943. Note the radar antennae, gun directors and eight-inch guns on these three heavy cruisers.
Diagram of torpedo damage to USS New Orleans sustained in the Battle of Tassafaronga that resulted in 150 feet of her bow being blown off.USS New Orleans in trials off Seattle in Elliott Bay, Washington, United States 30 Jul 1943 following major repairs at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.Minneapolis, San Francisco, and New Orleans bombard Wake, 5 Oct 1943Cruisers USS Salt Lake City, Pensacola, and New Orleans nested together at Pearl Harbor in Berth B-3, 30 Oct 1943. Note the radar antennae, gun directors and eight-inch guns on these three heavy cruisers.
Cruisers USS New Orleans and St. Louis bombard Saipan in the Mariana Islands, 15 Jun 1944. Photo taken from USS Wichita.Portside broadside view of the cruiser USS New Orleans off Mare Island, California, United States, 8 Mar 1945.
Cruisers USS New Orleans and St. Louis bombard Saipan in the Mariana Islands, 15 Jun 1944. Photo taken from USS Wichita.Portside broadside view of the cruiser USS New Orleans off Mare Island, California, United States, 8 Mar 1945.
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