Cutaway view of a proximity fuze for aerial bombs developed by Section E for the United States Army Air Corps. Rather than relying on a battery, this design employs a turbine driven by external blades.Cutaway diagram of a Mark 53 VT Radio Proximity anti-aircraft fuze. The on-board wet cell battery was always called the Reserve Battery even though it was the primary power source.Cutaway of a Mark 53 VT Radio Proximity anti-aircraft fuze showing, top to bottom, the radio transmitter/receiver, miniaturized electronics, power cell, explosive trigger safeties, and triggering charge.Exploded view of a Mark 53 VT Radio Proximity anti-aircraft fuze.
Cutaway view of a proximity fuze for aerial bombs developed by Section E for the United States Army Air Corps. Rather than relying on a battery, this design employs a turbine driven by external blades.Cutaway diagram of a Mark 53 VT Radio Proximity anti-aircraft fuze. The on-board wet cell battery was always called the Reserve Battery even though it was the primary power source.Cutaway of a Mark 53 VT Radio Proximity anti-aircraft fuze showing, top to bottom, the radio transmitter/receiver, miniaturized electronics, power cell, explosive trigger safeties, and triggering charge.Exploded view of a Mark 53 VT Radio Proximity anti-aircraft fuze.
Photo showing the compactness of the tubes manufactured especially for the VT proximity fuze (right) as contrasted with the conventional radio tube (left).Schematic drawing of a Mark 53 VT Radio Proximity anti-aircraft fuze. The on-board wet cell battery was always called the Reserve Battery even though it was the primary power source.Graphic from post-war Yank Magazine depicting how the VT Radio Proximity Fuze created an air burst with an artillery shell, 5 Nov 1945.Cutaway of the electrical energizer for the VT proximity fuze developed by the National Carbon Corporation, from a 1946 Bureau of Ordnance publication.
Photo showing the compactness of the tubes manufactured especially for the VT proximity fuze (right) as contrasted with the conventional radio tube (left).Schematic drawing of a Mark 53 VT Radio Proximity anti-aircraft fuze. The on-board wet cell battery was always called the Reserve Battery even though it was the primary power source.Graphic from post-war Yank Magazine depicting how the VT Radio Proximity Fuze created an air burst with an artillery shell, 5 Nov 1945.Cutaway of the electrical energizer for the VT proximity fuze developed by the National Carbon Corporation, from a 1946 Bureau of Ordnance publication.
Navy Bureau of Ordnance diagram showing a VT fuze’s area of radio sensitivity and comparative blast zone for shell fragments.
Navy Bureau of Ordnance diagram showing a VT fuze’s area of radio sensitivity and comparative blast zone for shell fragments.
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