Tinosa file photo [31377]

Tinosa

CountryUnited States
Ship ClassGato-class Submarine
Hull NumberSS-283
BuilderMare Island Navy Yard
Laid Down21 Feb 1942
Launched7 Oct 1942
Commissioned15 Jan 1943
Decommissioned23 Jun 1949
Displacement1,526 tons standard; 2,424 tons submerged
Length312 feet
Beam27 feet
Draft17 feet
MachineryFour Fairbanks Morse main generator diesel engines, four General Electric electric motors
Bunkerage94,400 gallons, two 126-cell main storage batteries
Power Output5,400 SHP
Speed20 knots
Range11,000 miles at 10 knots
Crew60
Armament10x21in torpedo tubes with 24 torpedoes, 1x3in/50 deck gun, 2x.50cal, 2x.30cal
Submerged Speed8.75 knots

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe Gato-class submarine Tinosa was laid down on 21 Feb 1942 at the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California, United States. The boat was launched on 7 Oct 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Katharine Malloy, wife of Captain William Molloy. She was commissioned 15 Jan 1943 with the very capable Lieutenant Commander Lawrence Randall "Dan" Daspit in command.

ww2dbaseAfter preliminary operations, the submarine proceeded to Hawaii, arriving at Pearl Harbor on 16 Apr 1943. On 3 May 1943, Tinosa left on her first war patrol southeast of Japan at the approaches to the Bungo Channel, the entrance into Japan's Inland Sea. She damaged three Japanese merchant ships and sustained some minor depth-charge damage herself before returning to Midway 19 Jun 1943.

ww2dbaseTinosa's second war patrol took her to the Japanese shipping lanes south of Guam where she endured what may be the most frustrating event in the entire United States World War II submarine experience. Commander Daspit received top-secret codebreaking intercepts alerting him that Japanese tanker Tonan Maru No. 3 would be transiting through Tinosa's patrol area. Tonan Maru was built in 1938 as a whaling factory ship but was converted to an oil tanker in 1942. At 42,000-tons fully loaded, she was the largest tanker the Japanese had during the war and would make quite a prize for any submarine commander. On 24 Jul 1943 at dawn, Tinosa spotted the Tonan Maru and fired four torpedoes. Two of them hit the ship but did not explode. Two more torpedoes were fired that hit the ship near the engine room. Both torpedoes exploded and Tonan Maru went dead in the water. The ship settled by the stern slightly but showed no signs of sinking. Daspit set up for a broadside torpedo shot to finish off the stricken ship. A seventh torpedo was fired that was seen to hit the ship but did not explode. An eighth torpedo was fired that was both seen and heard to hit the ship but did not explode. A ninth torpedo hit the vessel but did not explode. Daspit moved Tinosa around the ship checking for nets or any other torpedo countermeasures but observed none. A tenth torpedo was fired that clearly hit the ship but did not explode. Daspit fired an eleventh torpedo and described the results in his patrol report this way, "This torpedo hit well aft on the port side, made a splash at the side of the ship, and was then observed to have taken a right turn and to jump clear of the water about one hundred feet from the stern of the tanker. I find it hard to convince myself that I saw this." Daspit decided he would fire as many torpedoes as it took to sink this large ship except that he would save one for analysis back the base. He then fired four more torpedoes, one at a time, and all of them hit the ship but did not explode. By this time, a destroyer had arrived and began an attack on Tinosa that the submarine evaded.

ww2dbaseLtCdr Daspit had fired a total fifteen torpedoes at Tonan Maru. Two may have missed but more likely hit without exploding. Two exploded as designed. Eleven torpedoes were fired at point-blank range from a textbook firing position that were confirmed to have hit the ship but failed to explode. In the end, Tonan Maru made necessary repairs and Daspit had to watch through his periscope as the biggest tanker in the Japanese fleet continued on her way. Tinosa set a course for Hawaii.

ww2dbaseTinosa arrived at Pearl Harbor on 4 Aug 1943 and LtCdr Daspit went straight to the overall submarine commander, Rear Admiral Charles Lockwood. Years later, Lockwood would write in his book that during Daspit's description of the failed attack, the submarine commander was almost speechless with rage. The Navy's response to the defects of the Mark XIV torpedo is a story in and of itself that had nothing more to do with Tinosa; but suffice it to say, the manner of the Navy's response was not their finest moment. Following Tinosa's experience and similar reports from almost every other submarine commander, the Mark XIV was ultimately found to have not only one fatal design flaw but three, one in each of its critical components. Bureaucratic infighting delayed substantive analysis or improvements and the United States Navy did not have a reliable torpedo for their submarines until Oct 1943, when the war was half over. Most ironically for LtCdr Daspit, once the problem was identified it turned out the contact exploders had a defect that made them prone to fail in broadside attacks, like the failures seen against Tonan Maru, but the exploders performed better in oblique attacks, like the two that actually did explode against Tonan Maru. This ran contrary to everything submarine commanders had been taught about the "perfect" set up for a torpedo attack.

ww2dbaseMeanwhile, Tinosa received a thorough tender refit at Pearl Harbor and Daspit received a promotion to full Commander. Tinosa set out on her third war patrol to waters south of Guam, but still armed with the Mark XIV torpedo for there was nothing else. Tinosa made two torpedo attacks with one ship sunk and one damaged. Tinosa shelled a radio station with an antenna tower on Alet Island 180 miles west of Truk. For his performance on this patrol, Cdr Daspit was awarded the Navy Cross.

ww2dbaseTinosa sailed on her fourth war patrol back to the same area south of Guam. She sank four ships and possibly a fifth. During one attack, a torpedo failed to run from one of the stern tubes and the outer doors would not close. Before she could withdraw and make an inspection, Tinosa withstood a barrage of 34 depth charges, some of them quite close. Just after dark, Tinosa surfaced and came to a stop. Two officers volunteered to go over the side to make the examination and found one torpedo stuck in the tube but half ejected. A wedge was place in the impeller of the arming wheel and the swimmers returned aboard. Tinosa reversed at about eight knots and fired that tube again. The torpedo left the tube and sank.

ww2dbaseTinosa was drydocked at Fremantle, Australia for repairs and also had a routine change of command: Commander Donald Weiss relieved Commander Daspit. Tinosa boarded a group from Australia's Special Force Z as part of Operation Python II along with 5,000 pounds of their stores and equipment. The submarine then departed on her fifth war patrol bound for the South China Sea. On the northeast coast of Borneo near Labian Point, Tinosa surfaced at sunset off Turtle Beach and prepared to disembark the Force Z commandos. The members of Python I had been inserted into the same area three months earlier to set up a coast-watching operation and those men paddled out to meet the newcomers. After living in the jungle for three months, the coast-watchers spent two hours aboard Tinosa enjoying steak and ice cream while Tinosa's crew readied their supplies for transfer to the beach. The transfer took all night but just as the darkness began to lift, Tinosa shoved off to resume her patrol where she sank four ships and damaged another. Commander Weiss was awarded the Navy Cross for his performance on this patrol.

ww2dbaseTinosa was drydocked at Pearl Harbor and received many repairs and improvements, including replacing her 3-inch deck gun with a 4-inch gun. She left on her sixth war patrol in company with submarines USS Parche and Bang as a three-submarine wolfpack operating between Okinawa and Taiwan. Tinosa sank two ships and damaged another two before expending all of her torpedoes and withdrawing to Majuro Lagoon. For their performance on this patrol, Commander Weiss received his second Navy Cross and assistant approach officer Lieutenant Commander James Hunnicutt received the Silver Star. For Tinosa's performance on her last three patrols combined, she received the Presidential Unit Citation.

ww2dbaseTinosa departed Majuro for her seventh war patrol to the East China Sea. Part of her duties included lifeguard duty for the many B-29 Superfortress raids being made on Japan. Tinosa operated briefly with submarines USS Tang and Sealion before resuming her independent patrol. Tinosa sank four Japanese ships on this patrol. While heading for Midway, Tinosa came across a life raft containing the body of United States Navy aircrewman Jack Henry W. Cooper about 200 miles northeast of Chichi Jima. Tinosa prepared the airman for burial and committed his body to the deep.

ww2dbaseAfter short stops at Midway and Pearl Harbor, Tinosa sailed for San Francisco, California and Hunters Point Naval Shipyard for an extensive overhaul. Again, her deck gun was upgraded, this time to a 5-inch/25 gun. She also got FM sonar designed specifically to pick up submerged objects close aboard, such as mines. Mid-way through the overhaul, Commander Weiss was relieved of command and replaced by Lieutenant Commander Richard Latham.

ww2dbaseTinosa sailed on her eighth war patrol and quickly encountered deteriorating weather and increasingly rough seas. She took green water over the bridge that poured down the open hatch. One lookout was washed off the upper lookout station and onto the main deck, washed away again, and finally pulled to safety uninjured. Tinosa arrived at her patrol area around the Nansei Shoto Islands but continued to be plagued by rough seas coupled with strong Japanese anti-submarine radar signals coming from nearly every island. She was not able to develop a single attack but throughout this patrol Tinosa used her FM sonar on a "special mission" to probe the channels and harbor entrances to identify and, if possible, map any mined areas. This would be valuable intelligence for the upcoming Okinawa offensive then being planned. Tinosa ended this patrol at Pearl Harbor where LtCdr Latham was promoted to full Commander.

ww2dbaseTinosa transited to Saipan where she departed for her ninth war patrol which was plagued with problems, first with her bow planes and then, when trying to repair her bow planes, she lost her anchor. Tinosa spent one entire morning running through an enormous oil slick filled with floating debris and many Japanese bodies, some in full Army equipment. It seemed that a transport ship had been sunk. By mid-afternoon, Tinosa came upon a lifeboat with seventeen Japanese soldiers in unform. Tinosa took as prisoners the two with the most stars on their tunics and left the others to make their own way. After six days in her assigned area looking for Japanese shipping but finding none, Tinosa left her patrol area bound for Guam. Even though Tinosa's patrol was cut short due to the problems with her bow planes, she did more probing of harbor entrances for mines.

ww2dbaseAt Guam, repairs were made and there was an exchange of Executive Officers. Tinosa sailed on her tenth war patrol where she spent two weeks around Truk reconnoitering and performing lifeguard duty for the near daily raids by Liberator bombers flying from Guam. On her way out of the area, Tinosa paused at the small Ulul Island 150 miles northwest of Truk where she shelled a radar and radio station.

ww2dbaseTinosa's eleventh war patrol would be groundbreaking in submarine warfare. Tinosa joined eight other submarines that had been similarly fitted with FM sonar. Together, these nine submarines were to implement a daring plan created by Commander William "Barney" Sieglaff and approved personally by overall Pacific Area submarine commander Vice Admiral Charles Lockwood. The plan involved the large wolfpack using the FM sonar to navigate through the heavily mined Tsushima Strait and into the previously inaccessible Sea of Japan. The operation would be known as Operation Barney and would be under the tactical command of Commander Earl Hydeman, captain of the submarine USS Sea Dog. The nine submarines involved would be known collectively as Hydeman's Hellcats but they were further subdivided into three sections of three boats each. Section One, commanded by Hydeman, was known as Heydeman's Hepcats and consisted of Sea Dog, Spadefish, and Crevalle. Section Two was known as Pierce's Polecats, after USS Tunny captain Commander George Pierce, and consisted of Tunny, Skate, and Bonefish. Section Three was known as Bob's Bobcats, after USS Flying Fish captain Commander Robert Risser, and consisted of Flying Fish, Tinosa, and Bowfin.

ww2dbaseFlying Fish, Tinosa, and Bowfin departed Guam bound for the Sea of Japan but were diverted to lifeguard duty about 150 miles north of Chichi Jima on a report of a downed B-29 Superfortress near their track. Heavy fog prevented an efficient search but 24-hours after the aircrew bailed out, Tinosa located them and took aboard ten uninjured airmen of the bomber "Sky-Scrapper" (serial number 42-65364). Two days later, Tinosa transferred the airmen to the submarine USS Scabbardfish. Tinosa and the other Bobcats transited the dangerously mined waters of Tsushima Strait on 6 Jun 1945 and entered the Sea of Japan, known as "the Emperor's Back Yard." No sooner had Tinosa transited the strait that the weather and seas deteriorated but Tinosa had no choice but to head straight into it. Before the waters were deep enough to submerge safely, the submarine was already taking green water over the bridge. The pounding sea also caused more trouble with the bow planes. During her eighteen days in the Sea of Japan, despite the seas being choked with small fishing vessels and their nets, Tinosa sank four ships. Tinosa then turned northward to rendezvous with Flying Fish and Bowfin. The three submarines made a daring dash through the dangerously well-patrolled, not to mention heavily mined, La Pérouse Strait at the northern end of the Japan between Japanese and Russian islands. Although only suspected at the time, these were also the waters where the submarine USS Wahoo was lost in 1943 and whose revenge Operation Barney was all about. Despite the risks, the three submarines made the transit into the vast Pacific and set their courses for Midway and then Pearl Harbor. At dawn on 4 Jul 1945 off the coast of Oahu, Tinosa met with Flying Fish, Spadefish, Bowfin, and Skate along with destroyer USS Pruitt as escort. Pruitt had embarked the photographic units of both the area submarine commander Admiral Lockwood and the fleet commander Admiral Nimitz to photograph the submarines on their triumphant return. By 1030 that morning, all five submarines were tied up side-by-side at the submarine base in Pearl Harbor. Of the nine Hydeman's Hellcats, only Bonefish did not return and was presumed lost (later records suggested Bonefish survived the transit of Tsushima Strait and was lost in a depth charge attack on 18 Jun 1945 in Toyama Wan on Honshu). So impressed was Admiral Lockwood with Operation Barney's success in penetrating the Sea of Japan that he awarded the Navy Cross, or gold star in lieu thereof, to all nine boat captains. That included a posthumous second gold star to Commander Lawrence Edge of Bonefish. Admiral Lockwood also created The Distinguished Order of the Mighty Mine Dodgers with suitable certificates issued to every officer and crewman who made this patrol.

ww2dbaseTinosa had a three-week refit at Pearl Harbor followed by a week of tests and training. She departed Pearl Harbor on 11 Aug 1945 on her twelfth war patrol in company with submarine USS Crevalle. On 14 Aug 1945, Tinosa and Crevalle were ordered to Midway as Japan had surrendered.

ww2dbaseOn 26 Aug 1945, Tinosa departed Midway for an overhaul at San Francisco. She operated off the west coast of the United States from Jan to Jun 1946. On 23 Jun 1949, Tinosa was placed out of commission at San Francisco and laid up in the Pacific Reserve Fleet at Mare Island. During the Korean War, Tinosa was recommissioned 4 Jan 1952 but then decommissioned again on 2 Dec 1953 and laid up at Mare Island once again. Tinosa was struck from the Naval Register on 1 Sept 1958, used as a target ship, and then scuttled off Hawaii in Nov 1960.

ww2dbaseUSS Tinosa completed twelve war patrols in the Pacific covering 433 days on patrol. She earned nine battle stars and the Presidential Unit Citation. She was officially credited with sinking 16 enemy ships, totaling 64,655 tons, but her actual totals were almost certainly higher. Her battle flag, created by men who were there, claimed 22 merchant ships sunk and 12 damaged plus two islands shelled.

Submarine USS Tinosa War Patrols
No.FromToDaysAreaAttacks on ShippingNotes
1*3-May-194319-Jun-194347Bungo Channel3 ships damaged
2*7-Jul-19434-Aug-194328S of Guam1 ship damagedDismal torpedo failures
3*23-Sep-194316-Oct-194323NW of Truk1 ship damagedShelled Alet Island
4*27-Oct-194316-Dec-194350Palau4 ships sunk, 1 damaged
5*14-Jan-19444-Mar-194450Borneo4 ships sunk, 1 damagedLanded Australian Commandos
6*29-Mar-194415-May-194447East China Sea2 ships sunk, 2 damagedWolfpack with Bang and Parche
7*7-Jun-194430-Jul-194453East China Sea4 ships sunkWolfpack with Tang and Sealion
8*4-Dec-194430-Jan-194557Nansei ShotononeProbed channels and harbor entrances for mines
917-Mar-19457-Apr-194521East China SeanoneReturned early with bow plane problems
1028-Apr-194516-May-194518TruknoneShelled Ulul Island
11*29-May-19454-Jul-194536Sea of Japan4 ships sunkHydeman's Hellcats; more torpedo duds
1211-Aug-194514-Aug-19453---noneWar ended
   433 18 ships sunk, 9 damaged* = Successful Patrol earning a battle star (9)

ww2dbaseSources:
United States Navy
NavSource Naval History
CombinedFleet Japanese Naval History
UBoat.net
Strategy Bridge - Michael J. Hennelly, 8 Feb 2018
A. B. Feuer: Australian Commandos: Their Secret War Against the Japanese in World War II, p 32
Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Sep 2021

Submarine Tinosa (SS-283) Interactive Map

Tinosa Operational Timeline

21 Feb 1942 Gato-class submarine Tinosa was laid down at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California, United States.
7 Oct 1942 Submarine Tinosa was launched at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California, United States.
22 Nov 1942 Off Palau, submarine USS Tinosa fired six torpedoes to get five hits on two ships in six minutes. Cargo ships Yamato Maru and Kiso Maru were both sunk.
15 Jan 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa was commissioned at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California, United States with Lieutenant Commander Lawrence Randall “Dan” Daspit in command.
16 Apr 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for the first time.
7 May 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa departed Midway on her first war patrol.
17 May 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived on station off the Bungo Channel, Japan on her first war patrol.
19 Jun 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa completed her first war patrol and arrived at the Midway submarine base.
7 Jul 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa departed Midway on her second war patrol bound for the Japanese shipping lanes south of Guam.
24 Jul 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa, responding to Ultra decrypts, attacked the 19,200-ton Tonan Maru No. 3, the largest oil tanker the Japanese had during the war. Tinosa fired a total of 15 Mark XIV torpedoes at the tanker, most of them one at a time after the ship was dead in the water. Two torpedoes exploded, two may have missed, but the rest struck the ship but failed to explode. Tinosa had to break off the attack due to a lack of any more torpedoes while Tonan Maru sailed on.
4 Aug 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii at the end of her second war patrol.
25 Sep 1943 After leaving Pearl Harbor two days before for her third war patrol, submarine USS Tinosa stopped at Johnston's Island and received 11,000 gallons of fuel oil.
6 Oct 1943 Submarine USS Steelhead initiated a torpedo attack against the 10,000-ton fleet tanker Kazuhaya northeast of Truk scoring three hits. USS Tinosa followed up with six torpedo hits, causing the tanker to sink by the stern.
7 Oct 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa shelled a radio station on Alet Island with her 3-inch deck gun.
16 Oct 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Midway at the end of her third war patrol. For his performance on this patrol, Commander Daspit received the Navy Cross.
26 Nov 1943 Off Palau, submarine USS Tinosa torpedoed and sank the 4,000-ton cargo ship Shini Maru. Tinosa also fired on a larger freighter with unobserved results but Tinosa believed this ship burned and sank. In the second attack, one torpedo upon firing became stuck in one of the stern tubes, half in the tube and half out. After evading a barrage of 34 depth charges, Tinosa surfaced at night and made an inspection. Two officers volunteered to go over the side and assess the situation. A wedge was placed in the arming impeller and the tube was fired again. The torpedo left the tube and sank.
3 Dec 1943 West of Palau, submarine USS Tinosa torpedoed and sank the 6,600-ton passenger-cargo ship Azuma Maru.
6 Dec 1943 Bound for Darwin, Australia, submarine USS Tinosa crossed the equator for the first time.
10 Dec 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa stopped at Darwin, Australia where she took on 39,000 gallons of fuel oil before pressing on toward Fremantle.
16 Dec 1943 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Fremantle, Australia to end her fourth war patrol.
6 Jan 1944 Before departing Fremantle, Australia on her fifth war patrol, submarine USS Tinosa took aboard Australian commandos and 5,000 pounds of their equipment to be inserted in the jungles of Borneo.
13 Jan 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa took on extra fuel at Exmouth Gulf, Australia and also drilled on how to land Australian commandos onto Borneo.
20 Jan 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa inserted Australian commandos and 5,000 pounds of their equipment onto Turtle Beach near Labian Point on northeastern Borneo as part of Operation Python II.
22 Jan 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa attacked a convoy of four merchant ships plus escorts west of Borneo's northern cape. One spread of three torpedoes sunk the converted tankers Koshin Maru and Seinan Maru (10,900 tons combined).
15 Feb 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa attacked a convoy of four ships east of Leyte Gulf in the Philippine Sea and sank Odatsuki Maru and Chojo Maru.
4 Mar 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Pearl Harbor, completing her fifth war patrol. For his performance on this patrol, Commander Weiss was awarded the Navy Cross.
24 Mar 1944 Submarines USS Tang, Sealion (Balao-class) and Tinosa rendezvoused south of Danjo Gunto and began operating as a wolfpack in the shipping lanes off Nagasaki in southern Japan.
29 Mar 1944 Submarines USS Parche, Bang, and Tinosa departed Pearl Harbor as a three-submarine wolfpack. This would be the first war patrol for Parche and Bang and Tinosa’s sixth.
29 Apr 1944 Submarine USS Bang sighted a Japanese convoy northwest of Luzon in South China Sea and sank cargo ship Takegawa Maru and tanker Nittatsu Maru while also damaging cargo ship Yashima Maru. Parche and Tinosa also attacked. Tinosa was officially credited with no ships sunk but recorded torpedo hits on three ships with one believed to be sunk.
3 May 1944 Submarines USS Parche, Bang, and Tinosa attacked one Japanese convoy in the South China Sea and then another the following day for a total of five ships sunk.
9 May 1944 While retiring from her patrol area, submarine USS Tinosa made a surface attack on a large trawler believed to be a picket boat. After 12 hits from Tinosa's deck gun, the trawler was left burning and sinking by the stern.
15 May 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Majuro Lagoon at the end of her sixth war patrol. For her fourth, fifth, and sixth patrols combined, Tinosa received the Presidential Unit Citation. For performance during her sixth patrol, Tinosa's commanding officer, Commander Weiss, received his second Navy Cross, and the assistant approach officer, LtCdr James Hunnicutt, received the Silver Star.
7 Jun 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa departed Majuro on her seventh war patrol.
18 Jun 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa sank a 400-ton sailing vessel in the Tsushima Strait by tossing fuel oil and hand grenades onto the deck.
3 Jul 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa attacked a convoy of five ships southwest of Nagasaki, sinking the cargo ship Kamo Maru and the small tanker Konsan Maru.
19 Jul 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa departed the East China Sea bound for Midway.
21 Jul 1944 About 200 miles northeast of Chichi Jima, Tinosa came found a life raft with the body of Navy aircrewman Jack Henry W. Cooper. Tinosa prepared the airman for burial and committed his body to the deep.
30 Jul 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa ended her seventh war patrol at Pearl Harbor.
7 Aug 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in San Francisco, California for a well-deserved extensive overhaul.
13 Sep 1944 Lieutenant Commander Richard Latham relieved Commander Donald Weiss as commanding officer of submarine USS Tinosa.
4 Dec 1944 Submarine USS Tinosa departed Pearl Harbor on her eighth war patrol.
30 Jan 1945 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Pearl Harbor at the end of her eighth war patrol. Although Tinosa encountered no enemy shipping and conducted no attacks during this patrol, it was still deemed a successful patrol based on Tinosa's valuable intelligence gathering of mined channels and harbor entrances in and around the Nansei Shoto Islands.
1 Mar 1945 Submarine USS Tinosa departed Pearl Harbor bound for Saipan where she will begin her ninth war patrol.
11 Mar 1945 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Tanapag Harbor, Saipan.
17 Mar 1945 Submarine USS Tinosa departed Saipan on her ninth war patrol.
2 Apr 1945 Due to faulty bow plane controls, submarine USS Tinosa departed her patrol are after only six days on station bound for Guam.
7 Apr 1945 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam at the conclusion of her ninth war patrol. Tinosa tied up alongside tender USS Proteus for repairs and refit.
28 Apr 1945 Submarine USS Tinosa sailed from Guam on her tenth war patrol.
9 May 1945 Submarine USS Tinosa sank the 2,300-ton cargo ship Wakatama Maru along the Korean coast off Donghae.
14 May 1945 Submarine USS Tinosa shelled a possible radio and radar station on Ulul Island northwest of Truk.
16 May 1945 Submarine USS Tinosa arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam at the conclusion of her tenth war patrol.
29 May 1945 Submarines USS Flying Fish, Bowfin, and Tinosa, the “Bob’s Bobcats” element of “Hydeman’s Hellcats,” departed Guam bound for the Sea of Japan.
6 Jun 1945 Submarines Flying Fish, Tinosa, and Bowfin, the Bob's Bobcats element of Hydeman's Hellcats, used FM sonar to transit the heavily mined Tsushima Strait to enter the previously inaccessible Sea of Japan.
20 Jun 1945 Before dawn, submarine USS Tinosa torpedoed and sank the small merchantman Kaisei Maru and later that same day after dark she torpedoed and sank the larger cargo ship Taito Maru near the southern end of the Sea of Japan. These would be Tinosa’s last credited sinkings of the war.
24 Jun 1945 Submarines Flying Fish, Tinosa, and Bowfin, the Bob's Bobcats element of Hydeman's Hellcats, exit the Sea of Japan with a daring dash through La Pérouse Strait at the northern end of the Japan.
4 Jul 1945 Five of the eight surviving submarines of Operation Barney's Hydeman's Hellcats arrived safely at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii: USS Flying Fish, Spadefish, Tinosa, Bowfin, and Skate. All nine submarine captains from Hydeman's Hellcats received the Navy Cross, or gold star in lieu thereof, for this patrol.
23 Jun 1949 Submarine USS Tinosa was placed out of commission at San Francisco and laid up in the Pacific Reserve Fleet at Mare Island.
4 Jan 1952 Submarine USS Tinosa was reactivated from reserves and recommissioned at Mare Island, California.
2 Dec 1953 Submarine USS Tinosa was decommissioned for the last time at Mare Island, California and placed in reserves.
15 Nov 1960 [appx date] The hulk of submarine Tinosa was used as a target ship and scuttled off the coast of Hawaii.

Photographs

Submarine Tinosa being christened by sponsor Mrs. Katharine Malloy, wife of Captain William Molloy, at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California, United States, 7 Oct 1942.Submarine Tinosa shortly after launch at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California, United States, 7 Oct 1942.Submarine Tinosa, adorned with flags and bunting, sliding down the ways at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California, United States, 7 Oct 1942.Broadside view of submarine USS Tinosa off Mare Island Navy Yard, San Pablo Bay, California, United States, 5 Mar 1943.
See all 19 photographs of Submarine Tinosa (SS-283)



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Submarine Tinosa (SS-283) Photo Gallery
Submarine Tinosa being christened by sponsor Mrs. Katharine Malloy, wife of Captain William Molloy, at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California, United States, 7 Oct 1942.
See all 19 photographs of Submarine Tinosa (SS-283)


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