Potez 630 file photo [19690]

Potez 630

CountryFrance
ManufacturerSociété Nationale de Constructions Aéronautiques du Nord
Primary RoleHeavy Fighter
Maiden Flight25 April 1936

Contributor:

ww2dbasePotez 630 heavy fighters, designed by Louis Coroller and André Delaruelle, entered into French military service in May 1938. In Aug 1938, Potez 631 C3 heavy fighters, which used Gnome-Rhône 14M radial engines rather than the Hispano-Suiza 14AB10/11 engines, entered service. They were assigned to nightfighter squadrons and to commanders of single-seat fighter groups.

ww2dbaseRomania, Greece, and China each issued orders for Potez 630 heavy fighters in 1938, but a very small number of them were actually delivered, and only to Romania (two squadrons) and Greece (nine examples); as tensions rose in Europe, the French Air Force decided to take over the examples being built for the foreign purchasers.

ww2dbaseWhen Germany invaded France in May 1940, Potez 630 heavy fighters were withdrawn from front line service after only one combat mission, during which, on 20 May, three aircraft of the Potez 633 variant strafed advancing German ground units. The few examples in Greece saw combat against Italian invaders in late 1940. The nine aircraft originally intended for China were kept in French Indochina, where they saw action against Thai units during the Franco-Thai War of 1940-1941. The examples in Romania saw combat against the Soviets in southern Ukraine in mid-1941. Vichy-France operated a number of them, through only as trainers or liaison aircraft, through the end of the war. Although they had good flying characteristics, they were underpowered for their size and when compared to their German adversaries, thus they played only a small role, as far as combat actions were concerned, in WW2.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Nov 2013

Potez 630 Timeline

25 Apr 1936 The French Potez 630 aircraft took its first flight. It would be ultimately be developed into a successful range of fighters, bomber and reconnaissance aircraft seeing much service in German, Vichy and Free French air arms.
22 May 1940 French Air Force withdrew Potez 630 heavy fighters from front line service.

SPECIFICATIONS

Potez 630
MachineryTwo Gnome-Rhône 14M 4/5 14-cyl air-cooled radial engines rated at 700hp each
ArmamentOriginal: 1x7.5mm fixed forward MAC machine gun, 1x7.5mm fixed rear MAC machine gun, 1x7.5mm flex rear MAC machine gun. Later: 7x7.5mm fixed forward MAC machine guns, 3x7.5mm fixed rear MAC machine guns, 2x7.5mm flex rear MAC machine guns, 4x50kg bombs
Crew3
Span16.00 m
Length10.93 m
Height3.08 m
Wing Area32.70 m²
Weight, Empty3,135 kg
Weight, Maximum4,530 kg
Speed, Maximum425 km/h
Speed, Cruising299 km/h
Rate of Climb8.40 m/s
Service Ceiling8,500 m
Range, Normal1,500 km

Photographs

Australian troops with captured Morane-Saulnier MS.406 fighters and a Potez 630 bomber, Syria, Jul 1941Captured French Potez 63.11 aircraft, Aleppo, Syria, 1941Wrecked French Potez 630 and Farman 220 aircraft at Baalbek, Syria, 1941Potez 63.11 heavy fighter at an airfield, date unknown




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Potez 630 Heavy Fighter Photo Gallery
Australian troops with captured Morane-Saulnier MS.406 fighters and a Potez 630 bomber, Syria, Jul 1941
See all 4 photographs of Potez 630 Heavy Fighter




Famous WW2 Quote
"Since peace is now beyond hope, we can but fight to the end."

Chiang Kaishek, 31 Jul 1937