Battle of Suiyuan file photo [23769]

Battle of Suiyuan

20 Oct 1936 - 17 Nov 1936

Contributor:

ww2dbaseIn Oct 1936, a coalition of Japanese-puppet Mongolian Military Government troops, Jehol Mongols, Chahar Mongols, and Han-Chinese mercenaries totaling over 9,000 men marched into Suiyuan Province in northern China, supported by 20 to 30 Japanese advisers. Japan also contributed 30 armored cars and light tanks, field artillery pieces, and aircraft. The first major clash with the Chinese took place on 14 Nov at Hongor, where the two sides fought at a costly standstill for several days. On 17 Nov, however, the Chinese mounted a surprising counterattack, which drove the Mongolian troops back to Bailingmiao. A follow-up flanking movement by General Fu Zuoyi's Chinese troops captured Bailingmiao, taking over 200 Mongolians prisoner and ending the Mongolian offensive. In late Nov, Mongolian and Han irregulars launched a fresh attack on Bailingmiao, but they were beaten back with heavy losses as the Chinese had already anticipated such a counterattack.

ww2dbaseThough the Suiyuan offensive was a failure, troops of the Mongolian Military Government (renamed Mengjiang in 1937) continued to harass China throughout the Second Sino-Japanese War under Japanese urging.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia

Last Major Update: Sep 2006

Battle of Suiyuan Timeline

20 Oct 1936 Japanese-backed Mongolian troops marched into Suiyuan Province, China.
23 Nov 1936 Near Bailingmiao, Suiyuan Province, China, Chinese forces began marching toward Mongolian positions at midnight. At 1300 hours, Chinese forces of the Shanxi-Suiyuan Army began firing at Mongolian forward posts and took high ground.
24 Nov 1936 Chinese and Mongolian troops engaged in heavy combat near Bailingmiao, Suiyuan Province, China starting at 0100 hours through dawn, pushing back Mongolian forces back repeatedly. Chinese generals Sun Changsheng and Sun Lanfeng chose to make a major push despite sunrise, which meant Japanese air support might arrive at any time. Spearheaded by armored cars, Chinese troops pushed into the town of Bailingmiao, taking it by 0930 hours. 600 to 700 Monglians were killed, 200 were captured; the Chinese suffered 300 killed and wounded. Chinese troops captured 10 field guns, 10 machine guns, 600 rifles, several radios, 500 barrels of gasoline, a food storage dump, an ammunition dump, and many horses.
28 Nov 1936 3,000 Mongolian and Chinese irregulars loyal to the Japanese-sponsored puppet state Mengjiang launched an offensive toward Bailingmiao, Suiyuan Province, China.
3 Dec 1936 Mongolian and Chinese irregulars loyal to the Japanese-sponsored puppet state Mengjiang launched a failed attack against Chinese positions at Bailingmiao, Suiyuan Province, China.
4 Dec 1936 Mongolian and Chinese irregulars loyal to the Japanese-sponsored puppet state Mengjiang called off their offensive toward Bailingmiao, Suiyuan Province, China.

Photographs

Field gun crew of Shanxi-Suiyuan Army loyal to the Nationalist Chinese, Bailingmiao, Suiyuan Province, China, late Nov 1936




Did you enjoy this article? Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook
 Reddit
 Twitter

Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds




Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
More on Battle of Suiyuan
Participants:
» Ulaan Huu
» Fu, Zuoyi
» Li, Shouxin
» Zhao, Chengshou

Location:
» China

Battle of Suiyuan Photo Gallery
Field gun crew of Shanxi-Suiyuan Army loyal to the Nationalist Chinese, Bailingmiao, Suiyuan Province, China, late Nov 1936




Famous WW2 Quote
"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

Winston Churchill, on the RAF