German Panzer Mark IV medium tank with three half-inch holes through the armor from M1 Bazooka anti-tank rockets, near French-German border, 2 Jan 1945. Note the wire mesh panels for defense against magnetic mines.

Caption   German Panzer Mark IV medium tank with three half-inch holes through the armor from M1 Bazooka anti-tank rockets, near French-German border, 2 Jan 1945. Note the wire mesh panels for defense against magnetic mines. ww2dbase
Photographer   
Source    ww2dbaseUnited States Army Signal Corps
More on...   
PzKpfw IV   Main article  Photos  
M1/M9 'Bazooka'   Main article  Photos  
Photos on Same Day See all photos dated 2 Jan 1945
Added By David Stubblebine
Added Date 1 Jan 2006

This photograph has been scaled down; full resolution photograph is available here (1,914 by 1,522 pixels).

Licensing  Public Domain. According to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Commenter identity confirmed David Stubblebine says:
5 Nov 2015 12:55:01 AM

The wire mesh panels were mounted on the tank 10 inches away from the armor. Similar screens are used today as a defense against RPGs, but much sturdier than wire mesh would have been. In this case, the Bazooka was fired from a range of 25 yards.
2. Anonymous says:
5 Jan 2016 10:52:09 PM

Sorry, but this account is all wrong. This Panzer IV had mesh panels affixed to it to stave off magnet AT mines not to defend against Bazooka rounds. Again, this is but another example of the victors conjuring up a false account.
3. Commenter identity confirmed David Stubblebine says:
5 Jan 2016 11:45:51 PM

To Anonymous in Comment #2: Your explanation of the wire mesh makes so much more sense, especially considering how effective the screens were against bazookas in this case. The original caption was based on the source for the photo and may have used some faulty assumptions as you suggest. The caption here has since been corrected to reflect your input and thank for providing this information.
4. Joe Koss says:
28 Jun 2016 04:57:45 PM

Wire mesh screens, as well as the earlier plate metal Scheurzen, were meant to defeat shaped charges, such as those in Bazooka rounds, by detonating them before they reached the armor. They had nothing to do with magnetic mines. The defense against magnetic mines was Zimmerit, a non-ferrous paste that was factory-applied to vertical and near-vertical surfaces on tanks. Zimmerit provided a rough surface and separation between the armor and the mine, both of which made it harder for a mine to hold on long enough to explode. Zimmerit was used for two years and was discontinued when it was finally realized that it solved a minor problem and tanks were needed at the front as soon as possible.
5. Anonymous says:
3 Jan 2017 02:33:40 PM

Tank was taken more than 3 hits, look where the tracks are.

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