Lincoln Spire to Honour RAF Bomber Command

20 Apr 2015

Contributor: Alan Chanter

A 100ft-tall steel spire is due to be erected on the site on top of Canwick Hill, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom by June 9, in time for the nearby city of Lincoln's Magna Carta celebrations. Its height is the equivalent of a Lancaster bomber's wingspan. The two-metre high walls that will surround the spire are also due for completion by June. They will bear the names of 25,611 wartime servicemen from Lincolnshire bases who died for our freedom. The spire is being made in sections in Yorkshire and is due to be brought to Lincoln on three low loader lorries on May 10 and will be officially unveiled on October 2. The completed 8 million Bomber Command Centre is due to open next year.

For more information:
ITV: First glimpse of Lincoln spire built to honour Bomber Command
International Bomber Command Centre Website



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Anonymous says:
4 May 2015 08:55:41 PM

The Lancaster wingspan was at least 102 feet, not 100'. Why the error? British historians are far better than this.

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