Archive of Nazi War Crime Records to be Opened to Public

16 May 2006

After allowing it to be used for limited research for people to find records on relatives, the 11-nation commission in charge of the records kept by Nazi Germany has decided to open the archive to the public in the near future, but not until each of the 11 nations has given their authorizations and then go through a ratification process. The archive contains extremely detailed records of concentration camps victims, forced laborers, and political prisoners, and is said to be most valuable for Holocaust research and remembrance.

For more details, please see the original BBC article. For some information on the Holocaust, please see this WW2DB article.



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Anonymous says:
3 Feb 2009 12:15:15 PM

Hi, Would you please notify me by email when the archives become public and accessible through the internet. Thanks, Mark

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