Volodymyr Kubijovyč

SurnameKubijovyč
Given NameVolodymyr
Born23 Sep 1900
Died2 Nov 1985
CountryUkraine
CategoryGovernment
GenderMale

Contributor:

ww2dbaseVolodymyr Kubijovyč was born in Nowy Sącz, Galicia, Ukraine. He became a professor at the University of Kraków in Poland in 1928 and taught at the Ukrainian Free University in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in 1940. During the German occupation of Ukraine, he believed that cooperation with the German occupiers would help Ukraine achieve its independence from Russia. In 1943, as a member of the non-political Ukrainian Central Committee, he helped the Germans organize Ukrainians to fight on the Russian front; on 28 Apr 1943 the 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Galizien (1st Ukrainian) was born. He hoped that the SS Galizien was to become an Ukrainian force that would eventually become Ukraine's hope for independence. After Germany's defeat at the end of WW2, he escaped to West Germany and then France. Kubijovyč returned to academia after the war and passed away in Paris, France in 1985.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia.

Last Major Revision: Jun 2006

Volodymyr Kubijovyč Timeline

23 Sep 1900 Volodymyr Kubijovyč was born.
2 Nov 1985 Volodymyr Kubijovyč passed away.




Did you enjoy this article? Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook
 Reddit
 Twitter

Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds




Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites


Famous WW2 Quote
"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

Winston Churchill, on the RAF