Henderson file photo [714]

Nevile Henderson

SurnameHenderson
Given NameNevile
CountryUnited Kingdom
CategoryGovernment
GenderMale

Contributor:

ww2dbaseSir Nevile Henderson was Britain's ambassador to Germany between 1937 and 1939, which appoint was won by "duplicity" as commented by William Manchester; "any other foreign secretary, or prime minister, would have dismissed him long before he could inflict a mortal wound on European peace", said Manchester. Henderson's policies reflect his views that Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany must be appeased in order to avoid war in Europe, and many documents he had written back to London clearly showed his sympathy for the Nazi Party, particularly over the issue of Czechoslovakia, in which he went as far as calling the Czechs a "pigheaded race". British Minister of Parliament Duff Cooper described Henderson as "violently anti-Czech and pro-German" over that issue. William Manchester described him as a "diehard appeaser" and suggested that he was perhaps Nazi Germany's favorite foreign ambassador.

ww2dbaseSource: the Last Lion.

Last Major Revision: Jul 2006

Photographs

Neville Henderson and Adolf Hitler, Berlin, Germany, circa 1937 to 1939British Ambassador in Berlin Sir Nevile Henderson, 5 May 1937Polish ambassador Josef Lipski speaking at a Nazi Party rally, Nürnberg, Germany, 10 Sep 1938; note Himmler, Ribbentrop, Henderson, and Goebbels also presentBritish Ambassador to Berlin Nevile Henderson speaking to German Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop at the Grand Hotel at Berchtesgaden, Germany, 15 Sep 1938; note British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain in background
See all 8 photographs of Nevile Henderson



Did you enjoy this article? Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook
 Reddit
 Twitter

Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds




Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Philip Williams says:
21 Jan 2013 06:18:55 AM

Mr Henderson believed that significant Anglo-German engagement might avoid another world war, and he pursued that mightily. A more balanced view of his efforts can be found in Nevile Henderson's own book "Failure of a Mission" published in 1940 without the benefit of Mr Manchester's 20-20 hindsight.
2. Wayne C. Rhoads says:
3 Sep 2016 09:51:22 AM

Today is Sept 3, 2016, about 10:50 AM. Earlier this morning, I finished reading the summary of Sir Nevile Henderson's book, "Failure of a Mission" as it was condensed in "The World's Greatest Books" published by WM. H. Wise & Co. in 1943. The impression I have from Henderson's book is that he sincerely tried to help find a way to avoid a terrible war and it does not seem like appease- ment. Adolph Hitler was determined to have his war, despite all the efforts. I have owned this book of summaries since my days in high school. Seems Ironic that I would be reading this on the same date and time that Ambassador Henderson would be receiving instructions from London to advise the German Minister for Foreign Affairs about a state of war ultimatum. On the 7th of September, I will be 88 years young. And I well remember hearing the news on the radio that date when there was no response from the German Government and that a state of war existed.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.

Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
More on Nevile Henderson
Document(s):
» No. 12: Message from Sir N. Henderson to Viscount Halifax
» No. 23: Message from Viscount Halifax to Sir N. Henderson
» No. 36 & 48: Messages from Henderson to Halifax on Danzig
» No. 56, 60, 68, 74, 78, & 89: Messages Between Chamberlain/UK Government and Hitler
» No. 57-59, 69, 75, 76, 79-83, 87, 88, 91, 92, 99, 102, 103, 109-111, 114, 118: Messages Between Henderson and Halifax on Potential War

Related Books:
» Ministers at War: Winston Churchill and His War Cabinet

Nevile Henderson Photo Gallery
Neville Henderson and Adolf Hitler, Berlin, Germany, circa 1937 to 1939
See all 8 photographs of Nevile Henderson




Famous WW2 Quote
"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

Winston Churchill, on the RAF