Liu Zhesheng file photo [24318]

Liu Zhesheng

SurnameLiu
Given NameZhesheng
Born22 Feb 1914
Died18 Feb 1991
CountryChina
CategoryMilitary-Air
GenderMale

Contributor:

ww2dbaseLiu Zhesheng (Wade-Giles: Liu Che-sheng) was born in Baoding, Hebei Province, China in Feb 1914 into a family originally from Liling, Hunan Province, China. His father was a military officer. In 1931, he joined the Central Officer Academy as a patriotic response to the Japanese invasion of northeastern China. In 1934, he was transferred from the army's academy to the Central Aviation Academy; in 1936, he received a commendation from Chinese leader Chiang Kaishek for academic excellence. Upon graduation in Oct 1936, he was assigned to the 21st Pursuit Squadron of the 4th Pursuit Group. He scored his half-victory (shared with fellow pilot Li Guidan or his wingman Lieutenant Wang Wenhua; records differed on this information) on 14 Aug 1937 near Shanghai, China by downing a G3M bomber of Japanese Kanoya Air Group which had originally launched from Matsuyama Airfield in Taihoku (now Songshan Airport in Taipei), Taiwan. On the following day, he again shared the credit of a downing of a Japanese carrier aircraft near Shanghai; during this engagement, his aircraft was shot in the fuel tank, but he was able to land at Qiaoshi Airfield. In Sep 1937, his squadron was transferred to Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China, where the squadron would be changed to flying US-built Hawk III fighters to Soviet-built I-16 fighters. His first victories in the cockpit of an I-16 fighter came on 18 Feb 1938, when he shared the credit of downing two Japanese A5M monoplane fighters near Hankou, Hubei Province, China. On 31 May 1938, he again shared the credit for the downing of an A5M fighter. After the loss of Hankou to the Japanese, he was transferred to Chongqing, the temporary Chinese capital. During the night of 3-4 Aug 1939, flying alone in an I-15bis fighter, with assistance of search lights, he shot down a Japanese bomber. On 10 Jun 1940, he claimed a Japanese G3M2 bomber east of Chongqing; post war studies of both Chinese and Japanese records showed that the victory should have been shared with other pilots. On 16 Jul 1940, he shot down two Japanese aircraft. Late in the war, he attended the US Army Staff College at Fort Leavenworth in Leavenworth, Kansas, United States. When WW2 ended, he was the commanding officer of 24th Pursuit Squadron of 5th Pursuit Group.

ww2dbaseLiu relocated to Taiwan in 1949 when the Chinese Nationalists lost the civil war to the Communists. On 26 Feb 1961, the corpse of a female victim was found in a canal off Xinsheng South Road in Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China, and a dog hair was found on the body. For unknown reason, the dog hair matched that of Liu's family's pet, and the subsequent sensational news reporting led to his forced retirement from the Chinese Air Force at the rank of major general. It was ultimately found that the female victim was Chen Femei, and she was murdered by her husband Lu Jiaxiang, who had no association with Liu. After his retirement, he operated an ice cream parlor for some time. In late 1990, he traveled to Canada to visit his children, where he would pass away from cerebral hemorrhage in Feb 1991.

ww2dbaseSources:
Raymond Cheung, Aces of the Republic of China Air Force
Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Oct 2015

Liu Zhesheng Timeline

22 Feb 1914 Liu Zhesheng was born in Baoding, Hebei Province, China.
12 Oct 1936 Liu Zhesheng graduated from the Central Aviation Academy of China.
14 Aug 1937 Liu Zhesheng, flying a Hawk III fighter, shot down a G3M bomber of Japanese Kanoya Air Group near Shanghai, China. He shared this victory with fellow pilot Li Guidan or his wingman Lieutenant Wang Wenhua.
15 Aug 1937 Liu Zhesheng, flying a Hawk III fighter, shared the credit of a B2M aircraft from carrier Kaga with other pilots near Shanghai, China. He was forced to break off from the engagement after his aircraft was damaged in the fuel tank.
18 Feb 1938 Liu Zhesheng, flying an I-16 fighter, shot down two Japanese A5M fighters near Hankou, Hubei Province, China; both victories were shared with fellow pilots.
31 May 1938 Liu Zhesheng, flying an I-16 fighter, shared the credit for the downing of a Japanese A5M fighter over Hankou, Hubei Province, China.
3 Aug 1939 After sundown, Liu Zhesheng, flying an I-15bis fighter, shot down a Japanese bomber over Chongqing, China.
10 Jun 1940 Liu Zhesheng, flying an I-15bis fighter, together with other pilots, shot down a Japanese G3M2 bomber east of Chongqing, China.
12 Jun 1940 Liu Zhesheng, flying an I-15bis fighter, damaged three Japanese Ki-21 bombers near Chongqing, China.
16 Jul 1940 Liu Zhesheng shot down two Japanese aircraft.
11 Aug 1940 Liu Zhesheng damaged a Japanese G3M2 bomber.
18 Feb 1991 Liu Zhesheng passed away in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada.

Photographs

Portrait of Liu Zhesheng, 1930sLiu Zhesheng with an I-16 fighter, China, date unknownLiu Zhesheng with his fighter, China, date unknown




Did you enjoy this article? Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook  Reddit
 Twitter  Digg
 Google+  Delicious
 StumbleUpon  


Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds



Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
More on Liu Zhesheng
Event(s) Participated:
» Second Battle of Shanghai
» Bombing of Shanghai, Chongqing, and other Cities

Related Books:
» Aces of the Republic of China Air Force

Liu Zhesheng Photo Gallery
Portrait of Liu Zhesheng, 1930s
See all 3 photographs of Liu Zhesheng




Famous WW2 Quote
"The raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next 500 years."

James Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy, 23 Feb 1945