Fusata Iida

SurnameIida
Given NameFusata
Died7 Dec 1941
CountryJapan
CategoryMilitary-Sea
GenderMale

Contributor:

ww2dbaseNavy Lieutenant Fusata Iida was the flight leader of carrier Soryu's 1st Shotai during the second wave of the Pearl Harbor attack. He led a successful attack on the Kaneohe Naval Air Station, but was damaged by a 0.50 caliber machine gun stationed by Chief Ordnanceman John William Finn. Knowing he had little chance to return to his home carrier, he chose to crash into an enemy hangar.

ww2dbaseSource:

Last Major Revision: Jan 2005

Fusata Iida Timeline

7 Dec 1941 Fusata Iida passed away.




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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Joe Sampson says:
28 Jun 2006 12:37:32 AM

Although Lt Iida was reported by his flight to have crashed into a hangar, and he may have attempted to do so, he apparently was unsuccessful. He crashed onto a road near the side of Puu Hawaii Loa, today known as Kansas Tower, on MCBase Kanehoe Bay. His body was pulled from the wreckage at that spot by a civilian worker employed at the Naval Air Station. So, he did not crash into a hangar.
2. John King says:
30 Dec 2010 02:22:26 PM

I was a boy at Kaneohe Naval Air Station (Marine Base later) when Lt. Iida was shot down. The plane crashed near our house on Kaneohe - he had missed the hangar. After the attack my father a Navy Chief Petty Officer broke a piece of the plane's wing off and I still have it. He is deceased. The surprising thing about it is how light it is - almost like a piece of modern day coke can. It was, according to him, taken off at the rising sun on the wing.
3. William Richmond says:
10 Mar 2012 11:38:23 PM

My father was in the Navy and stationed at Kaneohe on December 7, 1941. He was one of the first to arrive at the crash site of Iida. He retrieved the scarf off of Iida's helmet which read "Certain Victory" in Japanese. In 1981 we saw an AP wire photo of Iida's family at his memorial in Hawaii. Our family sent the scarf back to his relatives.
4. William Richmond says:
11 Mar 2012 05:33:59 PM

I had the honor of meeting Chief Ordnanceman John William Finn on December 7, 2001 at Kaneohe. I was attending the 60th Anniversary activities of the attack on Pearl Harbor. I am wondering if anyone can clear up the question as to who actually shot down Fusata, Iida's plane. I have found a few references, including C. Peter Chen's, claiming it was Chief John Finn. However, in the book, AT DAWN WE SLEPT, (page 532) author GORDON PRANGE makes reference to an Aviation Ordnanceman named Sands as the one responsible for taking down Iida's plane. Any insight on this matter would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Wiliam Richmond
5. Christian says:
13 Jun 2012 07:13:44 PM

@William Richmond Hello, Genealogical curiosity I wish to know if your father was a native of Hawaii and it was called Andrew Richmond died in 1987 in Honolulu? Thank you in advance for your help. Christian
6. William Richmond says:
29 Oct 2012 06:42:48 PM

Christian; No, my father was Robertus M. Richmond from Hannibal, Missouri.(1914-1991) Just got your message. Sorry for the delay.

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