White Mammoths

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This book was written by a Russian tank man about WWII Russian tanker soldiers. Through the 17 chapters, he describes everything between when they received their KV tanks, right on up to when they fought the Germans in combat. He describes working with the factory workmen to finish the tanks, the training, railway travel to the front, and then the combat. As this book progresses through the battles he does describe losing friends and tanks in combat and one does get the feeling that they are no longer in awe of the German forces and feel (know) they will eventually win. Some of the chapters vividly describes the soldiers' feelings as they "capture/liberate" a pet dog from the Germans. The book does have pictures through out, but most of them have been seen in other publications. Additionally, though the book is on KV's, both KV and T34 models appear in the photos. The authour dies during the war, thus this book just ends after they capture a town.

This book is a war time publication and is no different from any other country making their forces seem that much more stronger than the enemy they are fighting.



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