King George V (1911)-class Battleship

CountryUnited Kingdom

Contributor:

This article refers to the entire King George V-class (1911); it is not about an individual vessel.

ww2dbaseKing George V-class battleships of 1911 were a group of four battleships built just before WW1. The design derived from their predecessors, the Orion-class battleships. They were heavier than the Orion-class ships, allowing them to carry heavier underwater armor. In terms of armament, they carried the same caliber guns as the Orion-class ships, but they fired heavier shells. Overall, this class of battleships were considered very successful. By the WW2-era, however, only one ship, HMS Centurion, remained. Outdated, Centurion played only relatively minor roles in th war.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia.

Last Major Revision: Dec 2007

Photographs

Centurion as appeared on a postcard, circa 1911-1913Allied cargo transfer point on Omaha Beach, 19 Jul 1944; note British battleship Centurion in the center of background




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King George V (1911)-class Battleship Photo Gallery
Centurion as appeared on a postcard, circa 1911-1913
See all 2 photographs of King George V (1911)-class Battleship




Famous WW2 Quote
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