120-PM-38 mortar file photo [24372]

120-PM-38 Launcher

Country of OriginRussia
TypeLauncher
Caliber120.000 mm
Barrel Length1,860.000 mm
Weight280.000 kg
Ammunition Weight16.00 kg
Range5,900 m
Muzzle Velocity272 m/s

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe 120-PM-38 mortars were based on the French Brandt Mle 1935 mortar design. Production began in 1938, and by 1945 (production would continue beyond the end of WW2) about 12,000 examples were in service. During the early years of the Russo-German War, they were used by forces of both sides, as large numbers of them were captured by Axis forces in the early campaigns of the war. Toward the final months of the war, they were in such great quantities that Soviet infantry often use them as artillery pieces rather than waiting for artillery battery units to arrive. They could each be broken up into three sections for the ease of transport. They remained in use through the Vietnam War.

Source: Wikipedia

ww2dbase

Last Major Revision: Sep 2015

Photographs

Captured Soviet 120-PM-38 mortars on display in Kharkov, Ukraine, 1940s




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Captured Soviet 120-PM-38 mortars on display in Kharkov, Ukraine, 1940s




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