Gilsenti M1910 file photo [26881]

Gilsenti M1910 Handgun

Country of OriginItaly
TypeHandgun
Caliber9.000 mm
Capacity7 rounds
Length207.000 mm
Barrel Length100.000 mm
Weight0.820 kg
Muzzle Velocity305 m/s

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe Glisenti Model 1910 handguns were designed by Bethel Abiel Revelli, who patented his design to the Societa Siderugica Glisenti of Turin. In 1906, Gilsenti sold the manufacturing rights of this design to Metallurgica Brescia gia Tempini, which began limited production in 1908. Weapons of this original variant fired 7.65x22mm bottle-neck cartridges, and these weapons failed to impressed Italian Army officers, who requested a redesign. The second variant, which was accepted and entered production in 1910, fired 9x19mm rounds. In 1912, Metallurgica Brescia gia Tempini submitted a plan for redesign, aiming to improve the Model 1910 pistols by strengthening their frames and removing the grip safety devices, but the plan was rejected by the Italian Army. After extensive service in WW1, production ceased in the early 1920s; about 100,000 examples were built. Officially they were declared obsolete in 1934, but a number of them nevertheless remained in service through the WW2 era.

Source: Wikipedia ww2dbase




Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook  Reddit
 Twitter  Digg
 Google+  Delicious
 StumbleUpon  


Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds

Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites


Famous WW2 Quote
"The raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next 500 years."

James Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy, 23 Feb 1945