Beretta M1934 Handgun

Country of OriginItaly
TypeHandgun
Caliber9.000 mm
Capacity7 rounds
Length150.000 mm
Barrel Length88.000 mm
Weight0.660 kg
Muzzle Velocity229 m/s

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe Beretta Model 1934 semi-automatic pistols were accepted for Italian military and police service in 1937. The relatively simple construction made them easy to maintain and reliable. They fired the 9-millimeter Corto ammunition, which was more commonly known as the .380 ACP. They saw extensive service with Italian forces during WW2. In addition to Italian forces, they were also used by the German Army (as Pistole 671(i)) and Romanian Army (delivered between Feb and Aug 1941, 40,000 units total). They remained popular, both in government and military service and in the civilian market, after WW2. In 1948, the Beretta Model 1934 handgun with serial number 606824 was used by Nathuram Godse in the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi; this particular pistol saw service in the Italian invasion and/or occupation of Abyssinia, and was likely captured and brought to India by a British officer. Production of this design did not cease until 1992, by which time about 1,080,000 examples were built.

Source: Wikipedia

ww2dbase

Last Major Revision: Nov 2007




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