Four Essex-class carriers at anchor at Ulithi, Caroline Islands, about 1600 on 2 Dec 1944; L to R: Wasp, Yorktown, Hornet, Hancock; viewed from Ticonderoga with sight of her F6F-5 Hellcat fighters

Caption   Four Essex-class carriers at anchor at Ulithi, Caroline Islands, about 1600 on 2 Dec 1944; L to R: Wasp, Yorktown, Hornet, Hancock; viewed from Ticonderoga with sight of her F6F-5 Hellcat fighters ww2dbase
Source    ww2dbaseUnited States Navy
Identification Code   80-G-294150
More on...   
F6F Hellcat   Main article  Photos  
Yorktown (Essex-class)   Main article  Photos  
Hornet (Essex-class)   Main article  Photos  
Ticonderoga   Main article  Photos  Maps  
Hancock   Main article  Photos  
Wasp (Essex-class)   Main article  Photos  
Photos on Same Day See all photos dated 2 Dec 1944
Added By David Stubblebine
Added Date 20 Jul 2008

This photograph has been scaled down; full resolution photograph is available here (1,915 by 1,511 pixels).

Licensing  Public Domain. According to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. William (Bill) L Rhoades says:
26 Jan 2009 11:29:50 PM

I think to keep such photo's in a collection is commendable, especially for those interested in the freedom of people and war for Mankinds' Freedom. Though war is not the preferred way, yet free men and woman continue to 'offer to pay the ultimate price' so that freedom of rights, liberty, religion are to be maintaned. I'm a history buff, for the WWII Pacific Theatre Naval, where our father served. So I am always adding to my 'collection of Pictures' that 'tell a true story'. These ships in Atolls, are peopled by (if one thinks about it)individuals now mostly passed away from those generations. The crews were called to muster from many parts of the USA in the 1940's and thrown together. Many were from different ethnic backgrounds, many of which knew little english. Thrown together during and afterwhich time all 'melded/melted' together and could then speak english as one might imagine, they needed to communicate during the conflict. So I'd say that during this time in the worlds history, Divine Creator such as our Father-in-Heaven, preserved His will for mankinds freedom by having a country that 'saved the world--with help' and set a standard for sacrifice, so that one day, when peace for all 'finally comes' we need have such records of peace as reminders. So thank you and keep saving these.

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Modern Day Location
WW2-Era Place Name Ulithi, Caroline Islands
Lat/Long 9.9700, 139.6700


Famous WW2 Quote
"Goddam it, you'll never get the Purple Heart hiding in a foxhole! Follow me!"

Captain Henry P. Jim Crowe, Guadalcanal, 13 Jan 1943