Minesweeper M1 file photo [29287]

M-class Minesweeper

CountryGermany

Contributor:

This article refers to the entire M-class; it is not about an individual vessel.

ww2dbaseThe German Navy classified all of its standard minesweepers into the M-class umbrella designation.

ww2dbase36 vessels were of WW1-vintage, classified as the M1915 and M1916 sub-classes.

ww2dbaseThe preparation for war led to the first new sub-class in 20 years, M1935, which were versatile vessels that served not only as minesweepers, but also as convoy escorts, anti-submarine ships, and minelayers. Two major drawbacks with the M1915 sub-class was the expensive price tag for construction, and the usage of oil-fired boilers, which, with hindsight, would be suffering from fuel shortages. A total of 69 ships of this sub-class were built between 1937 and 1941. 34 of them were lost during the war.

ww2dbaseThe M1940 sub-class represented a simpler design that was less expensive to build. Coal-fired boilers were used to diversify the fuel source. 127 ships were built between 1941 and 1944, and 63 of them would be lost during WW2.

ww2dbaseThe M1943 sub-class was further simplified from its predecessor by introducing pre-fabricated parts. There were a further four sub-variants for minesweeping, anti-submarine warfare, torpedo warfare, and torpedo training. Only 18 M1943 ships were built.

ww2dbaseAfter the war, surviving M-class ships were turned over to the United States, United Kingdom, and the Soviet Union as reparations. Many of them, especially those now under British ownerships, were used in their intended role to remove mines along the European coast. A few were later turned over to France and Norway, while two ships were turned over to Italy. Between 1956 and 1957, 11 of them were returned to the Germans to join the West German Navy.

ww2dbaseIn the early 1950s, Romania built 4 minesweepers based on the M1940 sub-class design, known as Democratia-class minesweepers and named DB-13 through DB-16. Spain built 14 ships of the M1940 sub-class design, which it designated the Guadiaro-class; 7 of them were later modernized and remained in operation for more than 30 years.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia

Photographs

Minesweeper M1 underway, date unknown




Did you enjoy this article? Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook
 Reddit
 Twitter

Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds




Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
More on M-class Minesweeper
Ships of this Class:
» M1
» M10
» M101
» M102
» M103
» M104
» M107
» M11
» M12
» M13
» M131
» M132
» M133
» M14
» M15
» M151
» M152
» M153
» M154
» M155
» M156
» M16
» M17
» M18
» M19
» M2
» M20
» M201
» M202
» M203
» M204
» M205
» M206
» M21
» M22
» M23
» M24
» M25
» M251
» M252
» M253
» M254
» M255
» M256
» M26
» M261
» M262
» M263
» M264
» M265
» M266
» M267
» M27
» M271
» M272
» M273
» M274
» M275
» M276
» M277
» M278
» M279
» M28
» M280
» M29
» M291
» M292
» M293
» M294
» M295
» M296
» M297
» M3
» M30
» M301
» M302
» M303
» M304
» M305
» M306
» M307
» M31
» M32
» M321
» M322
» M323
» M324
» M325
» M326
» M327
» M328
» M329
» M33
» M330
» M34
» M341
» M342
» M343
» M344
» M345
» M346
» M347
» M348
» M35
» M36
» M361
» M362
» M363
» M364
» M365
» M366
» M367
» M368
» M369
» M37
» M370
» M371
» M372
» M373
» M374
» M375
» M376
» M377
» M378
» M379
» M38
» M380
» M381
» M382
» M383
» M384
» M385
» M386
» M387
» M388
» M389
» M39
» M4
» M401
» M402
» M403
» M404
» M405
» M406
» M407
» M408
» M409
» M410
» M411
» M412
» M413
» M414
» M415
» M416
» M417
» M418
» M419
» M420
» M421
» M422
» M423
» M424
» M425
» M426
» M427
» M428
» M429
» M430
» M431
» M432
» M433
» M434
» M435
» M436
» M437
» M438
» M439
» M440
» M441
» M442
» M443
» M444
» M445
» M446
» M447
» M448
» M449
» M450
» M451
» M452
» M453
» M454
» M455
» M456
» M457
» M458
» M459
» M460
» M461
» M462
» M463
» M464
» M465
» M466
» M467
» M468
» M469
» M470
» M471
» M472
» M473
» M474
» M475
» M476
» M477
» M478
» M479
» M480
» M481
» M482
» M483
» M484
» M485
» M486
» M487
» M488
» M489
» M490
» M491
» M492
» M493
» M494
» M495
» M496
» M5
» M6
» M601
» M602
» M603
» M604
» M605
» M606
» M607
» M608
» M609
» M610
» M611
» M612
» M613
» M614
» M615
» M616
» M617
» M618
» M619
» M620
» M621
» M622
» M623
» M624
» M625
» M626
» M627
» M628
» M629
» M630
» M631
» M632
» M633
» M7
» M8
» M801
» M802
» M803
» M804
» M805
» M806
» M807
» M808
» M809
» M81
» M810
» M811
» M812
» M813
» M814
» M815
» M816
» M82
» M83
» M84
» M85
» M9

M-class Minesweeper Photo Gallery
Minesweeper M1 underway, date unknown




Famous WW2 Quote
"Goddam it, you'll never get the Purple Heart hiding in a foxhole! Follow me!"

Captain Henry P. Jim Crowe, Guadalcanal, 13 Jan 1943