I-14 file photo [27423]


Ship ClassType AM-class Submarine
BuilderKawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan
Laid Down18 May 1943
Launched14 Mar 1944
Commissioned14 Mar 1945
Sunk28 May 1946
Displacement3661 tons standard; 4838 tons submerged
Length373 feet
Beam39 feet
Draft19 feet
MachineryTwo diesel engines (2,200bhp each), two electric motors (300hp each), two propellers
Speed17 knots
Range21,000nm at 16 knots surfaced, 60nm at 3 knots submerged
Armament6x533mm bow torpedo tubes, 1x14cm/40 deck gun, 2x3x25mm Type 96 AA gun, 1x1x25mm Type 96 AA gun, 12 torpedoes
Submerged Speed5.5 knots
Aircraft2x M6A1 Seiran floatplane


ww2dbaseThe Japanese Navy submarine aircraft carrier I-14 was commissioned in Mar 1945. She carried two M6A1 Seiran floatplanes, which were launched with a single catapult and were recovered using two folding cranes. She was one of the submarines meant to carry out surprise attacks deep in enemy waters, with the Panama Canal as the initial prime target. The target was later shifted to the US Navy anchorage at Ulithi Atoll in the Caroline Islands. She never saw combat before the war's end, however. She was surrendered at sea to the Americans on 27 Aug 1945. After being studied by the US Navy, she was sunk as a target just off Barber's Point, Oahu, US Territory of Hawaii in 1946. Her wreck was discovered by a a group from the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 2009.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia

Submarine I-14 Interactive Map

I-14 Operational Timeline

18 May 1943 The keel of Submarine No. 5091 was laid down at Kobe, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan by Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation.
14 Mar 1944 I-14, previously known as Submarine No. 5091, was launched at Kobe, Japan.
5 Nov 1944 Commander Tsuruzo Shimizu was made the Chief Equipping Officer of I-14.
14 Mar 1945 I-14 was commissioned into service; Commander Tsuruzo Shimizu remained in command. The submarine was assigned to Yokosuka Naval District. She departed Kobe later in the same day.
15 Mar 1945 I-14 arrived at Kure, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan.
16 Mar 1945 I-14 departed Kobe, Japan.
27 May 1945 I-14 departed Kure, Japan for Chinkai, Korea, at 0000 hours together with I-13. They came under attack in the Straits of Shimonoseki later in the day, but escaped unscathed. They arrived at Moji, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan later on the same day.
28 May 1945 I-14 departed Moji, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan, arriving at Chinkai Naval Station in Chinkai (now Jinhae), Korea later in the same day.
29 May 1945 I-14 departed Chinkai Naval Station in Chinkai (now Jinhae), Korea.
2 Jun 1945 I-14 arrived at Nanao, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan.
4 Jun 1945 Japanese submarine I-14 received her full complement of Seiran aircraft while at Nanao, Japan.
20 Jun 1945 I-14 departed Nanao, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan.
22 Jun 1945 I-14 arrived at Maizuru, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan.
2 Jul 1945 I-14 departed Maizuru, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan.
4 Jul 1945 I-14 arrived at Mutsu, Aomori Prefecture, Japan.
6 Jul 1945 I-14 arrived at Ominato Guard District in Mutsu, Aomori Prefecture, Japan. She was then drydocked for propeller bearing repairs.
17 Jul 1945 I-14 departed Mutsu, Japan.
17 Jul 1945 I-14 departed Ominato Guard District in Mutsu, Aomori Prefecture, Japan at 1500 hours.
30 Jul 1945 I-14 was attacked by US destroyers east of the Mariana Islands. She remained submerged for 35 hours, charging her batteries by snorkel.
3 Aug 1945 I-14 detected a group of US destroyers while sailing 150 miles northeast of Truk, Caroline Islands at 0330 hours; she reversed course in order to avoid detection.
4 Aug 1945 I-14 arrived at Truk, Caroline Islands at 1730 hours and disembarked her two M6A1 aircraft.
18 Aug 1945 I-14 departed Truk, Caroline Islands.
27 Aug 1945 I-14 was detected by an aircraft from US Task Force 38. She would surrender to USS Murray and USS Dashiell later on the same day.
28 Aug 1945 I-14 was boarded by a prize crew under the command of Commander Clyde Stevens, which was delivered by USS Bangust. 40 Japanese sailors were transferred to US vessels to make room for Stevens' crew.
29 Aug 1945 I-14 arrived at Sagami Bay west of Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan and was moored alongside USS Proteus.
30 Aug 1945 I-14 departed Sagami Bay near Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan at 0820 hours. At 1458 hours, she laid anchor in Tokyo Bay.
31 Aug 1945 I-14 entered the breakwater of Yokosuka Naval District, Kanwagawa Prefecture, Japan.
15 Sep 1945 I-14 was struck from the Japanese Naval List.
1 Nov 1945 I-14, under the command of US Navy Commander John S. McCain, Jr., departed Yokosuka, Japan for Sasebo, Japan.
11 Dec 1945 I-14, under the command of US Navy Commander Hiram Cassedy, departed Sasebo, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan.
19 Dec 1945 I-14 arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam at 0911 hours.
21 Dec 1945 I-14 departed Guam for Eniwetok, Marshall Islands.
26 Dec 1945 I-14 arrived at Kwajalein, Marshall Islands.
27 Dec 1945 I-14 departed Kwajalein, Marshall Islands.
1 Jan 1946 I-14 crossed the International Date Line.
6 Jan 1946 I-14 arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
28 May 1946 I-14 served as a target ship for the Mark 10-3 exploder about895 8 miles off Barber's Point, Oahu, US Territory of Hawaii. She was sunk by a torpedo from USS Bugara.
15 Feb 2009 The wreck of I-14 was discovered by the submersibles Pisces IV and Pisces V of the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory off Barber's Point, Oahu, Hawaii, United States at the depth of about 800 meters.
17 Feb 2009 Submersibles Pisces IV and Pisces V of the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory conducted extensive surveys of the wreck of I-14. She was broken into two pieces.


I-401 and I-14 alongside of USS Proteus (far left), Yokosuka, Japan, 29 Aug 1945USS Proteus, I-400, I-401, and I-14, Yokosuka, Japan, 29 Aug 1945USS Proteus, I-401, and I-14, Yokosuka, Japan, 29 Aug 1945Japanese submarine I-14 with a US Navy crew, late 1945 or early 1946

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Submarine I-14 Photo Gallery
I-401 and I-14 alongside of USS Proteus (far left), Yokosuka, Japan, 29 Aug 1945
See all 4 photographs of Submarine I-14

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