14 Jul 1945
  • USS Missouri escorted carriers while the aircraft struck Japan. ww2dbase [Main Article | CPC]
  • Light carrier Hosho received orders to transit the Shimonoseki Strait for Moji, Japan, but the order was repeatedly delayed due to US air attacks. ww2dbase [Main Article | Tabular Record of Movement | CPC]
  • USS Trepang rescued down US Navy airman Lieutenant (junior grade) Bill Kingston from the water. ww2dbase [Main Article | CPC]
  • The French celebrated Bastille Day for the first time since 1940. ww2dbase [TH]
  • The US Seventh Air Force was assigned under the Far East Air Forces. ww2dbase [CPC]
  • Destroyer HMCS St. Francis, while under tow to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, sank off Sagonnet Point, Rhode Island, United States after colliding with transport Winding Gulf. ww2dbase [CPC]
  • Escort carrier Rabaul was launched. ww2dbase [CPC]
  • Destroyer USS Glennon was launched. ww2dbase [CPC]
  • US carrier aircraft struck the airfield at Misawa, Aomori in northern Japan, destroying the G4M bombers that were assigned to partake the planned Operation Ken, which sought to deliver 300 suicide commandos to the Mariana Islands. The mission was launched by the US Navy with knowledge of Operation Ken. ww2dbase [CPC]
Burma
  • Francis Tuker was promoted to the war-time rank of lieutenant general and was given temporary command of British IV Corps in Burma. ww2dbase [Main Article | CPC]
Canada
  • Corvettes HMCS Chilliwack and Fredericton were decommissioned at Sorel, Quebec, Canada. ww2dbase [CPC]
  • Corvette HMCS Fergus was decommissioned at Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada. ww2dbase [CPC]
Germany
  • Eisenhower dissolved the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force at Königssee, Thüringen, Germany. ww2dbase [Main Article | CPC]
Japan
  • USS Yorktown (Essex-class) launched strikes on the northernmost Japanese island of Hokkaido. ww2dbase [Main Article | Event | DS]
  • Landing ship No. 174 was completed. ww2dbase [Main Article | CPC]
  • American battleships USS South Dakota, USS Indiana, and USS Massachusetts and escorting destroyers bombarded Kamaishi, Honshu, Japan; the primary target was the Kamaishi Works of the Japan Iron Company, but several destroyers shells overshot the target and hit the town, killing many civilians; battleship shells were more accurate, destroying about 65% of the industrial complex, but they also killed many civilians; this was the first time the Japanese home islands were subjected to naval bombardment. To the north, the sinking of 6 warships and 37 steamers on the ferry route between Honshu and Hokkaido effectively cut off the latter from the rest of the home islands. At Kure, aircraft of US Navy TF 38 damaged carrier Amagi, carrier Katsuragi, and battleship Haruna. Far to the south, the USAAF XXI Bomber Command canceled a long-range P-51 raid from Iwo Jima to attack Meiji and Kagamigahara near Nagoya due to poor weather. ww2dbase [Main Article | CPC]
Pacific Ocean
  • USS Bluefish sank Japanese submarine I-351 in the South China Sea. ww2dbase [Main Article | CPC]
Photo(s) dated 14 Jul 1945
Augusta in North Sea, 14 Jul 1945, as she carried Truman on his way to take part in the Potsdam conference; note cruiser PhiladelphiaBattleship Indiana, battleship Massachusetts, and cruiser Quincy bombarding Kamaishi, Iwate, Japan, 14 Jul 1945Warships Indiana, Massachusetts, Chicago, and Quincy steaming in a column off Kamaishi, Iwate, Japan, 14 Jul 1945US Army Lieutenant A. H. Hadden and his staff working on passes issued to participants of the Potsdam Conference, Germany, 14 Jul 1945
See all photos dated 14 Jul 1945

14 Jul 1945 Interactive Map

Timeline Section Founder: Thomas Houlihan
Contributors: Alan Chanter, C. Peter Chen, Thomas Houlihan, Hugh Martyr, David Stubblebine
Special Thanks: Rory Curtis




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Famous WW2 Quote
"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

Winston Churchill, on the RAF