USS Bogue file photo [31604]

Bogue

CountryUnited States
Ship ClassBogue-class Escort Carrier
Hull NumberCVE-9
BuilderSeattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation, Tacoma, Washington, United States
Laid Down1 Oct 1941
Launched15 Jan 1941
Commissioned26 Sep 1942
Decommissioned30 Nov 1946
Displacement8,520 tons standard; 14,200 tons full
Length465 feet
Beam69 feet
Draft23 feet
MachineryTwo Foster-Wheeler 285 psi boilers, one Allis-Chalmers steam turbine, one shaft
Power Output8,500 shaft horsepower
Speed18 knots
Crew890
Armament1942: 2x5in/51cal guns, 10x20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannon; 1945: 2x5in/38cal guns, 8x2x40mm Bofors anti-aircraft guns, 20x20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannon
Aircraft24
Elevators2
Catapults1

Contributor:

ww2dbaseIn 1941 in the United States, the Todd Shipyard in Tacoma, Washington was operated by the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation. The shipyard had eight shipways and in late 1941 and early 1942, all eight were occupied with Type C-3-class hulls under construction. Normally, this hull design was the basis for several manners of merchant ships but on 1 May 1942 all eight were acquired by the United States Navy for completion as auxiliary aircraft carriers. These would ultimately become Bogue-class escort carriers Bogue, Card, Nassau, Altamaha, Core, Barnes, Block Island, and the British lend-lease escort carrier HMS Tracker.

ww2dbaseOn 15 Sep 1942 at the Puget Sound Navy Yard in Bremerton, Washington, what began as Maritime Commission Hull #170 to be named "Steel Advocate" was commissioned as Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue, lead ship of her class. Commanding was Captain Giles E. Short, a 1918 graduate of the United States Naval Academy who would later command the fleet carrier USS Intrepid.

ww2dbaseAfter a brief shakedown period at San Diego, Bogue transited the Panama Canal and began her service in the Atlantic. On 5 Mar 1943, Bogue departed Argentia, Newfoundland as an escort for Convoy HX-288 bound for Liverpool, United Kingdom. According to plan, Bogue and her escort group detached from the convoy mid-ocean and started back toward Newfoundland. The day after Bogue turned around, one of her escort ships, USS Belknap, came across a lifeboat from the freighter SS Jonathan Sturges with 21 men aboard. Eighteen were survivors from Jonathan Sturges and three were Dutch seaman from SS Madoera. Both ships had been sunk 15 days earlier by German submarines U-707 and U-653 respectively during Wolfpack Ritter's attacks on Convoy ON-166 bound from Liverpool to New York.

ww2dbaseBogue spent the next two months escorting trans-Atlantic convoys before arriving in Belfast, Northern Ireland. There, she had High Frequency Direction Finding equipment installed. Abbreviated HF/DF but usually called "Huff-Duff," this was an essential tool for detecting German submarines operating in the Atlantic. HF/DF detected and gave a direction toward submarines transmitting radio messages.

ww2dbaseOn Bogue's return voyage escorting Convoy ON-184 to North America, the convoy came under attack from the 21 boats of Wolfpack Mosel. On 21 May 1943, Lieutenant Commander William Drane, commanding officer of Bogue's Composite Squadron VC-9 flying a TBF-1 Avenger, attacked and damaged submarine U-231. The next day, with the wolfpack still attacking, several of Bogue's aircraft executed five different attacks against different submarines. U-305 was moderately damaged and U-569 was damaged so badly that she was later scuttled by her crew. Once Bogue delivered Convoy ON-184 to Argentia on 26 May 1943, her mission was redirected to lead a dedicated anti-submarine Hunter-Killer group.

ww2dbase"Black May" was just drawing to a close and the value of the Hunter-Killer concept had more than proven itself. Built around the Navy's smallest aircraft carriers, Hunter-Killer groups became feasible with the convergence of several factors as the war progressed. One was the availability of enough small aircraft carriers, escort ships, and aircraft to outfit these groups; another was the development of specialized anti-submarine weaponry like the Mark 24 FIDO homing torpedo and the growing dependability of sonobuoys; and finally, the breaking of the German submarine enigma codes that allowed the Allies to reasonably predict U-Boat (German submarine) locations. Much of the enigma traffic related to when and where submarines would meet other submarines for replenishment, something that played perfectly to the hands of the Hunter-Killer groups. Hunter-Killer groups were formed in both the Atlantic and Pacific and in time, 14 United States escort carriers would lead them: USS Santee, Bogue, Card, Core, Block Island (Bogue-class), Croatan, Anzio, Mission Bay, Guadalcanal, Tripoli, Wake Island, Solomons, Tulagi, and Hoggatt Bay. Additionally, British and Canadian escort carriers led other Hunter-Killer groups in the North Atlantic but subscribed to a slightly different doctrine.

ww2dbaseOn 4 Jun 1943 in the Central Atlantic during Bogue's first Hunter-Killer mission, Bogue had a HF/DF contact and launched five Avengers. Those planes interrupted a meeting of three surfaced submarines and the ensuing attack damaged U-228, U-603, and U-641. The next day, Bogue aircraft sunk U-217 with the loss of all hands. Over the following week, Bogue aircraft damaged U-758 and sank U-118 before arriving at Norfolk, Virginia at the end of this very auspicious first patrol.

ww2dbaseDuring a maintenance period at Norfolk, Bogue had a routine change of command with Commander Joseph Dunn relieving Captain Short. Commander Dunn was a 1925 graduate of the United States Naval Academy who had spent much of his career in the submarine service.

ww2dbaseShortly after sailing on her next anti-submarine sortie, Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue (ACV-9) was reclassified as Escort Carrier USS Bogue (CVE-9). A week later, one of Bogue's escorts, destroyer USS George E. Badger, made a sound contact on a submarine in the eastern Atlantic and attacked. Floating debris and an oil slick were reported and U-613 was lost with all hands. That same day, Bogue aircraft came across a rendezvous between U-527 and U-648. U-527 was sunk outright but U-648 escaped. Five more weeks of searching yielded no submarine contacts and Bogue put into Norfolk once again. Upon arrival, Commander Dunn's orders came through finalizing his promotion to Captain.

ww2dbaseBogue then made another Hunter-Killer sortie that lasted six weeks without any confirmed attacks on submarines. Her following sortie in Nov 1943 would prove to be more productive. In the normal U-Boat refueling area east of the Azores, Bogue aircraft and task group destroyers made an aggressive attack against U-764 but inflicted no damage (some sources say this attack sank U-86 but this is less likely). The following day, U-238 was caught on the surface and attacked by two Bogue aircraft. In accordance with Großadmiral Dönitz' new "fight back" policy, the U-Boat put up considerable anti-aircraft fire. Neither airplane was damaged and the submarine escaped with minimal damage but the strafing killed two and wounded five. After a brief stop at Casablanca, Bogue and her escorts entered a two-day running battle with submarine U-172. After deploying over 200 depth charges, U-172 was sunk with 13 killed and 46 rescued. Among the prisoners was the U-Boat's commanding officer, Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Hoffmann, one of the youngest submarine commanders in the German Navy at 22. Four days later, Bogue Avengers launched FIDO homing torpedoes at the submerging U-850 and the boat was lost with all hands. After a brief stop at Bermuda, Bogue arrived at Norfolk.

ww2dbaseBogue returned to escort duty for one convoy from New York to Scotland and back. In late Feb 1944, Bogue returned to offensive anti-submarine assignments and departed Norfolk. In the early morning of 13 Mar 1944, Fortress aircraft from RAF No. 220 Squadron based on Terceira Island in the Azores dropped depth charges on the surfaced German submarine U-575 that caused little or no damage. Responding to the bomber's radio reports, surface ships closed in. These included Canadian frigate HMCS Prince Rupert, detached from a nearby convoy just for this attack, and aircraft and escort ships from Bogue's task group. They made a day-long attack that ultimately sank the U-Boat with 18 killed and 37 rescued. After ports of call at Casablanca and Trinidad, Bogue returned to Norfolk on 19 Apr 1944.

ww2dbaseWhile at Norfolk, Captain A.B. "Abe" Vosseller relieved Captain Dunn as Bogue's commanding officer. Captain Vosseller was a 1925 graduate of the United States Naval Academy and was a veteran of the anti-submarine PBY Catalina patrol squadrons operating out of Argentia. He was awarded the Legion of Merit for his part in creating the Navy's Hunter-Killer anti-submarine doctrine when he served at Quonset Point, Rhode Island with the Aircraft Submarine Warfare Development Detachment, a unit that he commanded from the detachment's beginning.

ww2dbaseBogue put to sea on 5 May 1944 on another anti-submarine mission. On 13 May 1944, one of Bogue's escorts, destroyer escort USS Francis M. Robinson, made sonar contact with a submerged submarine. Robinson attacked with Hedgehogs and depth charges armed with magnetic fuzes. Large underwater explosions were noted and although it was not clear to the US Navy for several weeks, the Japanese submarine RO-501 was lost with all hands. RO-501 was the former German U-1224 that had been transferred to the Japanese Navy with a Japanese crew three months earlier at Kiel, Germany. When she was sunk, RO-501 was bound for Japan with a cargo of mercury, lead, steel, uncut optical glass, aluminum, and blueprints for Type IXC submarines and Messerschmitt Me-163 "Komet" rocket interceptors.

ww2dbaseAt the other end of Bogue's eight-week sortie, Captain Vosseller received an intelligence report describing a mid-Ocean meeting between a German submarine and a different Japanese submarine. The German U-530 had been sent to meet the northbound Japanese I-52 to transfer radar detection equipment and three German technicians. Bogue attempted to intercept this meeting but arrived shortly after the rendezvous was completed and the boats had separated. Bogue's planes detected the Japanese submarine on the surface, however, and attacked with FIDO torpedoes; I-52 was destroyed with all hands.

ww2dbaseI-52 had been on a Yanagi mission that used submarines to exchange valuables and technology between Germany and Japan. At the time of her sinking, I-52 carried 2 tons of gold, 120 tons of tin, 113 tons of tungsten, 54 tons of raw rubber, 9.8 tons of molybdenum, 3.3 tons of quinine, 2.88 tons of opium, and 58 kg of caffeine plus 14 engineers and technicians as passengers. In the entire war, only two Japanese submarines were sunk in the Atlantic and Bogue's task group sank both of them just six weeks apart. Bogue and her escorts put into Norfolk on 3 Jul 1944.

ww2dbaseAfter a month of refit and anti-submarine exercises off Bermuda, Bogue resumed her anti-submarine patrols. On 20 Aug 1944 300 miles south of Newfoundland, Bogue aircraft spotted the German submarine U-1229 running on the surface in broad daylight. In a coordinated attack by 5 Avengers and 2 Wildcats using depth charges, FFAR rockets, and strafing, the submarine was sunk. 18 were killed and 41 were rescued. Among the survivors was Oskar Mantel, an intelligence officer who was to be landed in the Gulf of Maine had U-1229 not been sunk. This attack also gave United States Naval Intelligence their first detailed photographs of a German submarine equipped with a schnorkel device. On 24 Sep 1944, Bogue arrived at Norfolk.

ww2dbaseOn 5 Oct 1944 while at Norfolk, Captain George Dufek relieved Captain Vosseller as Bogue's commanding officer. Captain Dufek was a 1925 graduate of the United States Naval Academy and in 1939, he had been navigator on Admiral Richard Byrd's flagship during his third Antarctic expedition.

ww2dbaseBogue entered a six-month period where she operated out of Bermuda, Argentia, and Quonset Point training aviators and destroyers in the Hunter-Killer tactics. The exercises often involved friendly submarines acting as targets, including the 1919 submarine USS R-6, formerly commanded by Bogue's second commanding officer, Joseph Dunn.

ww2dbaseIn late Mar 1945, United States intelligence services learned that a German submarine wolfpack, Gruppe Seewolf, was bound for the American coast. Reports suggested, but could not confirm, that these submarines were capable of launching the Vergeltungswaffe V-1 "Buzz-Bomb" pulse-jet missiles against American cities. These reports were later proven to be without merit but at the time the fear was fueled by propaganda statements from Germany's Albert Speer that such capabilities existed and they were reinforced by interrogations of captured German agents, including Oskar Mantel. Concern over these submarine-launched missile attacks led the United States Navy to implement Operation Teardrop. Operation Teardrop involved two Barrier Groups that were sort of Super-Hunter-Killer groups where the number of escort carriers was increased from one to two and the accompanying destroyer escorts were increased from five to twenty. A north-south Barrier Line of destroyer escorts stretching 120 miles per group would be formed across the Central Atlantic, backed by the carriers, to intercept Gruppe Seewolf as the wolfpack's advance was monitored through enigma intercepts. The First Barrier Force, centered around carriers USS Mission Bay and Croatan, formed at sea on 8 Apr 1945. The Second Barrier Force would be centered around carriers Bogue and Core with Bogue's Captain Dufek in command.

ww2dbaseBogue put to sea from Quonset Point on 16 Apr 1945 and once her force was assembled, they established their barrier line in the mid-Atlantic as a southerly extension of the line formed by Mission Bay's force, stretching their entire net to 240 miles. Together, the two forces retreated westward as intelligence reports tracked the advance of Gruppe Seewolf. On 23 Apr 1945, Bogue's air squadron commander observed the U-546 coming to the surface. More airplanes and escort ships pounced on the scene and the hunt continued through the night. The following morning, destroyer escort USS Frederick C. Davis picked up a strong submarine signal on her sonar but when the ship turned to attack, she was struck by a GNAT acoustic torpedo fired from U-546's stern tubes. The torpedo struck Davis in the engineering spaces resulting in a tremendous explosion. Davis broke in two and sank. 126 men were killed and 66 survived. U-546 was now surrounded by destroyer escorts and was attacked, forced to the surface, and ultimately sunk by gunfire. 26 were lost and 33 were rescued.

ww2dbaseOperation Teardrop continued maintaining its barrier line for two more weeks until Germany's formal surrender on 8 May 1945. At that point, Bogue's task group was dissolved and its ships sailed independently for ports in the United States; Bogue to New York.

ww2dbaseWith the Atlantic war over, Bogue sailed for the Pacific with a load of aircraft. Bogue sailed from the west coast as far west as Guam and back. On 14 Aug 1945, as Bogue was preparing to depart Alameda, California for Adak, Alaska, the war in the Pacific ended. Upon Bogue's return to Alameda from Adak, Captain Dufek was relieved by Captain Jesse McClure, a 1926 Naval Academy graduate.

ww2dbaseBogue crisscrossed the Pacific as part of Operation Magic Carpet touching ports in Hawaii, the Mariana Islands, the Philippines, Okinawa, and Japan. On 16 Jan 1946, Bogue arrived back at Puget Sound's Commencement Bay and Tacoma, Washington. This was Bogue's point of origin but on this occasion, she had returned for her deactivation overhaul. During that overhaul, Bogue experienced her last change of command when Commander Paul Griggs relieved Captain McClure. Nine months later on 30 Nov 1946, USS Bogue was decommissioned and placed in the Reserve Fleet. While still part of the Reserve Fleet, Bogue was sold for scrap on 25 Jun 1960 and broken up a short time later.

ww2dbaseBogue aircraft and escorts sank a total of 10 German submarines and two Japanese submarines (some sources put the total at 13 with U-86 but this is doubtful). Additionally, Bogue attacked and damaged at least seven submarines. For six of Bogue's eight anti-submarine missions combined, she was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation that also extended to all of the ships and air squadrons serving in those groups. Moreover, three of Bogue's more successful Hunter-Killer sorties were individually authorized for Battle Stars, one on the American Campaign Ribbon and two on the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Ribbon. Bogue also earned the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, and the Navy Occupation Medal with "Asia" clasp.

ww2dbaseSources:
United States Navy
UBoat.net
NavSource Naval History
Japanese Naval History (combinedfleet.com)
The Museum of Flight Oral History Collection - Zeke Cormier
Todd Pacific Shipyards, Inc.
Port of Tacoma
Maritime Museum - Battle of the Atlantic
USS Frederick C. Davis DE-136 "The Fightin' Freddie"
World Naval Ships
Find-A-Grave
Bob Bryant
Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Dec 2021

Escort Carrier Bogue (CVE-9) Interactive Map

Bogue Operational Timeline

1 Oct 1941 Maritime Commission Type C-3-class Hull #170 was laid down at the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation’s Tacoma shipyard with th prospective nam of Steel Advocate. The hull would later be repurposed as the Bogue, lead ship in a class of auxiliary aircraft carriers for the United States Navy.
15 Jan 1942 Maritime Commission Type C-3-class Hull #170 was launched at the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation’s Tacoma shipyard with Mrs. William Miller acting as sponsor. The hull would later be repurposed as the Bogue, an auxiliary aircraft carrier for the United States Navy.
1 May 1942 As she was being fitted out at the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation’s Tacoma shipyard, Maritime Commission Type C-3-class Hull #170 was acquired by the United States Navy for the purpose of making it into the auxiliary aircraft carrier Bogue. Her final fitting out as a Bogue-class escort carrier was completed at the Puget Sound Navy Yard.
26 Sep 1942 Bogue-class escort carrier USS Bogue was placed in commission at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington with Captain Giles E. Short in command. Bogue was commissioned as an Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier (ACV).
17 Nov 1942 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue departed Puget Sound, Washington bound for San Diego, California.
21 Nov 1942 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue arrived at North Island, San Diego, California, United States.
11 Dec 1942 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue departed San Diego, California bound for the Panama Canal. Composite Squadron VC-9 reported aboard with their compliment of TBF-1 Avengers and F4F-4 Wildcats.
23 Dec 1942 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue transited the Panama Canal from the Pacific to the Atlantic.
31 Dec 1942 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
24 Feb 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue departed Norfolk, Virginia bound for Argentia, Newfoundland.
28 Feb 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue arrived at Argentia, Newfoundland.
5 Mar 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue departed Argentia, Newfoundland bound for mid-Atlantic rendezvous with eastbound Convoy HX228.
10 Mar 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her escorts detached from Convoy HX228 in the mid-Atlantic and set course back toward Argentia, Newfoundland.
11 Mar 1943 While escorting Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue in the mid-Atlantic, destroyer USS Belknap discovered a lifeboat from freighter SS Jonathan Sturges. Belknap recovered 21 survivors, 18 from Jonathan Sturges and 3 Dutch seaman from SS Madoera. Jonathan Sturges and Madoera had been sunk 15 days earlier by German submarines U-707 and U-653 respectively during Wolfpack Ritter’s attacks on Convoy ON-166 bound for New York from Liverpool. [Another Jonathan Sturges lifeboat with 6 survivors was located by U-336 on 6 Apr 1943; all 6 were taken POW.]
14 Mar 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Argentia, Newfoundland.
20 Mar 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Argentia, Newfoundland bound for mid-Atlantic rendezvous with eastbound Convoy SC123.
26 Mar 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her escorts detached from Convoy SC123 in the mid-Atlantic and set course back toward Argentia, Newfoundland.
30 Mar 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Argentia, Newfoundland.
7 Apr 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue departed Argentia, Newfoundland bound for Philadelphia Navy Yard for emergency repairs to her aircraft catapult.
10 Apr 1943 After being diverted, Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue arrived at Boston Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts.
17 Apr 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue departed Boston bound for Argentia, Newfoundland.
20 Apr 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue arrived at Argentia, Newfoundland.
23 Apr 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Argentia, Newfoundland bound for mid-Atlantic rendezvous with eastbound Convoy HX-235.
30 Apr 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her escorts detached from Convoy HX-235 in the eastern Atlantic and set course toward Belfast, Northern Ireland.
2 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Banghor Bay, Belfast Harbor, Northern Ireland where Bogue would have HF/DF radio detection gear installed (Huff-Duff).
14 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue shifted from Belfast to the Firth of Clyde, Scotland for calibration of her HF/DF radio detection gear.
15 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue returned to Belfast, Northern Ireland from the Firth of Clyde, Scotland for 16 hours before departing again bound for Iceland.
17 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue arrived at Hvalfjörður, Iceland where she stayed just one night.
18 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Iceland and joined the escort of Convoy ON-184.
21 May 1943 LtCdr William Drane, commanding officer of Composite Squadron VC-9, flying a TBF-1 Avenger from Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue attacked and damaged the German submarine U-231 in the North Atlantic.
22 May 1943 As German submarine Wolfpack Mosel of 21 boats continued its attack on North Atlantic Convoy ON-184, several aircraft flying from USS Bogue executed five different attacks against different submarines and damaged U-569 so badly that she was later scuttled by her crew along with also damaging U-305.
26 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Argentia, Newfoundland.
31 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue and her escorts departed Argentia, Newfoundland on a purely offensive anti-submarine patrol. This was Bogue's first Hunter-Killer sortie without concurrent convoy escort duty.
4 Jun 1943 Aircraft from USS Bogue attacked and damaged German submarines U-228, U-603, and U-641 in the Central Atlantic.
5 Jun 1943 Aircraft from USS Bogue attacked German submarine U-217 in the Central Atlantic and the submarine was lost with all 50 hands.n
8 Jun 1943 Aircraft from USS Bogue attacked and damaged German submarine U-758 in the Central Atlantic.
12 Jun 1943 Aircraft from USS Bogue attacked and sank the German submarine U-118 in the Central Atlantic.
20 Jun 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States. Task Group 21.12 was dissolved and made eligible for European-African-Middle Eastern Area Engagement Star E207. This sortie was one of six Bogue sortie's singled out in a Presidntial Unit Citation.
9 Jul 1943 While at Norfolk, Commander Joseph Dunn relieved Captain Short as commanding officer of USS Bogue.
12 Jul 1943 USS Bogue and her escorts departed Norfolk, Virginia on a Hunter-Killer mission along the convoy routes to Africa.
15 Jul 1943 While at sea, Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue (ACV-9) was reclassified as Escort Carrier USS Bogue (CVE-9).
23 Jul 1943 One of Bogue’s escorts, destroyer USS George E. Badger, made a sound contact on a submarine and attacked. Debris and an oil slick were reported and U-613 was lost with all 48 hands. Later that same day, aircraft from escort carrier USS Bogue interrupted a rendezvous between German submarines U-527 and U-648 in the eastern Atlantic. U-527 was sunk but U-648 escaped.
24 Jul 1943 Destroyer USS Clemson transferred 5 of the 13 survivors from German submarine U-527 to escort carrier USS Bogue, including the submarine’s commanding officer, Kapitänleutnant Herbert Uhlig. Two of the prisoners were immediately admitted to sickbay for observation.
1 Aug 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco. Thirteen POWs from U-527 were turned over to shore authorities.
5 Aug 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Casablanca, French Morocco and resumed their Central Atlantic patrol.
23 Aug 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia. This sortie was one of six Bogue sortie's singled out in a Presidntial Unit Citation. Upon arrival, Commander Dunn's orders came through finalizing his promotion to Captain. Composite Squadron VC-9 disembarked the ship to Naval Air Station Norfolk.
5 Sep 1943 Composite Squadron VC-19 came aboard escort carrier USS Bogue with their FM-1 Wildcats and TBF-1c Avengers. Bogue and her escorts put to sea on an offensive Hunter-Killer anti-submarine mission along the Atlantic convoy routes between North America and Africa.
26 Sep 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco.
29 Sep 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Casablanca, French Morocco and resumed their Central Atlantic patrol.
2 Oct 1943 The Task Group centered around escort carrier USS Bogue received an intelligence decrypt bulletin indicating a possible gathering of German submarines for refueling about 300 miles north of the Azores (ironically, it would be Composite Squadron VC-9 now aboard USS Card, acting on the same intelligence bulletin, that would interrupt this fueling rendezvous two days later and sink two submarines, including the tanker submarine).
20 Oct 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia.
29 Oct 1943 After four days in drydock, escort carrier USS Bogue was floated out of Drydock No. 4 at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia. Bogue would spend the next several days dockside completing her overhaul.
14 Nov 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her escorts put to sea on an offensive Hunter-Killer anti-submarine mission along the Atlantic convoy routes between North America and Africa.
29 Nov 1943 East of the Azores, aircraft from escort carrier USS Bogue observed German submarine U-764 on the surface. Both planes and destroyers from Bogue’s screen aggressively attacked over a sustained period but inflict no damage. [Note: Other sources describe this attack as sinking U-86 but this is less likely.]
30 Nov 1943 East of the Azores, two pilots flying from escort carrier USS Bogue observed German submarine U-238 on the surface and attacked. The U-Boat put up considerable anti-aircraft fire and the submarine escaped with two killed and five wounded by machine gun fire and minimal damage to the boat.
5 Dec 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco.
8 Dec 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Casablanca, French Morocco and resumed their Central Atlantic patrol.
12 Dec 1943 TBF Avengers from USS Bogue attacked the surfaced German submarine U-172 in the eastern Atlantic using Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedoes. U-172 evaded the attack but a 27-hour running battle followed.
13 Dec 1943 After TBF Avengers from USS Bogue attacked the surfaced German submarine U-172 in the eastern Atlantic the day before and after a 27-hour running battle that included over 200 depth charges being dropped from the destroyers USS George E. Badger, USS Clemson, USS Osmond Ingram, and USS Du Pont, U-172 sank with 13 killed and 46 survivors taken prisoner.
15 Dec 1943 The commanding officer of Composite Squadron VC-6, LtCdr John L. “Jack” Counihan, flying from Hunter-Killer escort carrier USS Core landed aboard USS Bogue to deliver 50 sonobuoys and mail.
16 Dec 1943 The 46 prisoners from U-172 (survivors) sunk three days before were transferred from escort ships to escort carrier USS Bogue including the submarine’s commanding officer, Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Hoffmann, among the youngest submarine commanders in the German Navy at 22.
20 Dec 1943 TBF Avengers from USS Bogue attacked the surfaced German submarine U-850 in the eastern Atlantic with Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedoes. The U-850 was lost with all 66 hands.
25 Dec 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Port Royal Bay, Bermuda.
26 Dec 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Bermuda bound for Norfolk, Virginia.
29 Dec 1943 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia. 46 prisoners from U-172 were turned over to shore authorities. Composite Squadron VC-19 disembarked Bogue. This sortie was one of six Bogue sortie's singled out in a Presidntial Unit Citation.
13 Jan 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her escorts departed Norfolk, Virginia bound for New York.
14 Jan 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Staten Island Army Base, New York.
18 Jan 1944 Loaded with Army aircraft, escort carrier USS Bogue departed New York bound for Scotland as part of 43-ship Convoy UT-7 consisting of 3 escort carriers, 12 cargo ships, 12 troop transports, 1 seaplane tender, 1 stores ship, and 1 oil tanker plus an escorting force of 1 battleship and 12 destroyers.
28 Jan 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived in Glasgow, Scotland at the King George V Dock.
3 Feb 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and Convoy TU-7 departed Glasgow, Scotland bound for New York.
12 Feb 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue detached from Convoy TU-7 and proceeded independently to Norfolk, Virginia.
14 Feb 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Norfolk, Virginia.
26 Feb 1944 Composite Squadron VC-95 came aboard escort carrier USS Bogue with their FM-1 Wildcats and TBF-1c Avengers. Bogue and her escorts put to sea on an offensive Hunter-Killer anti-submarine mission along the Atlantic convoy routes between North America and Africa.
13 Mar 1944 U-575, a German Type VII-C submarine, was sunk in the north Atlantic north of the Azores by depth charges and gunfire from the Canadian frigate HMCS Prince Rupert, the US destroyer USS Hobson, the US destroyer escort USS Haverfield, a British Wellington aircraft of No. 172 Squadron RAF, and two Fortress aircraft of Squadron 206 RAF and Squadron 220 RAF, and an Avenger aircraft of VC-95 squadron aboard the US escort carrier USS Bogue. 18 crew lost their lives; 37 were rescued.
18 Mar 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco.
22 Mar 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Casablanca, French Morocco and resumed their Central Atlantic patrol.
12 Apr 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Port of Spain, Trinidad.
13 Apr 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Port of Spain, Trinidad.
19 Apr 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia. Composite Squadron VC-95 disembarked Bogue. This sortie was one of six Bogue sortie's singled out in a Presidntial Unit Citation.
23 Apr 1944 While at Norfolk, Captain Aurelius Bartlett "Abe" Vosseller relieved Captain Dunn as commanding officer of USS Bogue.
5 May 1944 Composite Squadron VC-69 came aboard escort carrier USS Bogue with their FM-2 Wildcats and TBF-1c Avengers. Bogue and her escorts put to sea on an offensive Hunter-Killer anti-submarine mission along the Atlantic convoy routes between North America and Africa.
13 May 1944 One of the escort ships in USS Bogue’s task group, destroyer escort USS Francis M. Robinson, made sonar contact with a submerged submarine and attacked with Hedgehogs and depth charges with magnetic fuzes resulting in large underwater explosions. The Japanese submarine RO-501 was lost with all hands, although this was unclear to the US Navy for several weeks. [RO-501 was the former German U-1224 that had been transferred to the Japanese Navy 3 months earlier in Kiel, Germany. RO-501 was sailing to Japan with a cargo of mercury, lead, steel, uncut optical glass, aluminum, and blueprints for Type IXC submarines and Messerschmitt Me-163 "Komet" rocket interceptors.]
29 May 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco.
2 Jun 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Casablanca, French Morocco and resumed their Central Atlantic patrol.
24 Jun 1944 Acting on intelligence intercepts, Hunter-Killer carrier USS Bogue attempted to intercept the meeting between German submarine U-530 and Japanese submarine I-52 in the mid-Atlantic as I-52 was transiting to Germany with 21,000kg of precious metals and other intelligence cargo. A TBM Avenger from Bogue located I-52 on the surface but not U-530. Launching Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedoes against the submarine, I-52 was sunk with all 109 aboard.
30 Jun 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Port Royal Bay, Bermuda.
1 Jul 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Bermuda bound for Norfolk, Virginia.
3 Jul 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia. Composite Squadron VC-69 disembarked Bogue. This sortie was one of six Bogue sortie's singled out in a Presidntial Unit Citation.
25 Jul 1944 Composite Squadron VC-42 came aboard escort carrier USS Bogue with their FM-2 Wildcats and TBM-1c Avengers. Bogue and her escorts put to sea on an offensive Hunter-Killer anti-submarine mission along the Atlantic convoy routes in the North Atlantic.
28 Jul 1944 East of Bermuda, aircraft from escort carrier USS Bogue, along with Bogue's task group, spent two days conducting anti-submarine exercises against submarine USS R6.
29 Jul 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Port Royal Bay, Bermuda.
1 Aug 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Bermuda bound for their patrol area in the Central Atlantic.
20 Aug 1944 300 miles south of Newfoundland, aircraft flying from escort carrier USS Bogue spotted the German submarine U-1229 running on the surface in broad daylight. In a coordinated attack by 5 Avengers and 2 Wildcats using depth charges, FFAR rockets, and strafing, the submarine was sunk. 18 were killed and 41 were rescued. Among the survivors was Oskar Mantel, an intelligence officer who was to be landed in the Gulf of Maine had U-1229 not been sunk. This contact gave the US Navy their first detailed photographs of a German submarine equipped with a schnorkel device.
24 Aug 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Argentia, Newfoundland.
28 Aug 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Argentia, Newfoundland and resumed their patrol.
24 Sep 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia. Composite Squadron VC-42 disembarked Bogue. This sortie was one of six Bogue sortie's singled out in a Presidntial Unit Citation.
5 Oct 1944 While at Norfolk, Captain George Dufek relieved Captain Vosseller as commanding officer of USS Bogue.
21 Oct 1944 Composite Squadron VC-95 came aboard escort carrier USS Bogue with their FM-2 Wildcats, TBM-3 Avengers, and TBM-1D Avengers. Bogue and her escorts put to sea bound for Bermuda for anti-submarine exercises.
23 Oct 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Port Royal Bay, Bermuda.
24 Oct 1944 East of Bermuda, aircraft from escort carrier USS Bogue, along with Bogue's task group, spent three days conducting anti-submarine exercises against submarine USS R6 and friendly Italian submarine RIN Tito Speri.
7 Nov 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Bermuda for five days of anti-submarine exercises against submarine USS R1.
13 Nov 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Bermuda for three days of anti-submarine exercises against friendly Italian submarine RIN Onice.
20 Nov 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Bermuda bound for New York.
25 Nov 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at New York City, New York.
4 Dec 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue with VC-95 embarked and her task group departed New York on an offensive ant-submarine patrol in the shipping approaches to the northeastern United States.
15 Dec 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia.
26 Dec 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Norfolk bound for Bermuda.
28 Dec 1944 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at Port Royal Bay, Bermuda.
1 Jan 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group departed Bermuda for a week of anti-submarine exercises against friendly Italian submarines RIN Atropo and Tito Speri.
16 Jan 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group arrived at New York Navy Yard, New York.
20 Jan 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed New York bound for Quonset Point, Rhode Island.
21 Jan 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Quonset Point, Rhode Island.
11 Feb 1945 Loaded with 47 US Army P-47 Thunderbolts and 175 US Army and Navy personnel as passengers, escort carrier USS Card and the similarly loaded USS Bogue departed New York as part of Convoy CU-58 bound for Liverpool, England, United Kingdom.
22 Feb 1945 Escort carriers USS Card and Bogue arrived at Liverpool, England, United Kingdom.
2 Mar 1945 Escort carriers USS Card and Bogue departed Liverpool bound for New York.
11 Mar 1945 While at sea, escort carriers USS Card and Bogue detached from Convoy UC-58(B) and change course to Norfolk, Virginia.
12 Mar 1945 Escort carriers USS Card and Bogue arrived at Norfolk, Virginia.
15 Mar 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Norfolk bound for Quonset Point, Rhode Island.
17 Mar 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Quonset Point, Rhode Island.
23 Mar 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Quonset Point bound for Norfolk, Virginia.
24 Mar 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Norfolk, Virginia.
11 Apr 1945 Composite Squadron VC-19 came aboard escort carrier USS Bogue as put to sea bound for the New London, Connecticut area for anti-submarine exercises.
12 Apr 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group began 3 days of anti-submarine exercises in a 65-mile x 34-mile area of the Atlantic south of Nantucket Island against submarine USS Mackerel.
16 Apr 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group put to sea from Quonset Point, Rhode Island on an offensive anti-submarine patrol in the northwest Atlantic.
20 Apr 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue and her task group rendezvoused with the task group centered around escort carrier USS Core and also with two other squadrons of destroyers and destroyer escorts, all under the command of Captain Dufek in Bogue. Together they formed what was later called the Second Barrier Force tasked with forming a 120-mile long anti-submarine barrier in the mid-Atlantic as part of Operation Teardrop.
23 Apr 1945 Commanding officer of Composite Squadron VC-19, LtCdr William South, flying a TBM Avenger from escort carrier USS Bogue in the mid-Atlantic reported a surfacing German submarine, the U-546. More airplanes and all 14 destroyer escorts in the barrier line, including USS Frederick C. Davis, were sent to hunt for the U-Boat.
24 Apr 1945 One of the ships in USS Bogue’s mid-Atlantic scouting line of destroyer escorts, USS Frederick C. Davis, was torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-546 with a GNAT acoustic torpedo. 126 men were lost and 66 were rescued. Surrounded by destroyer escorts, U-546 was attacked, forced to the surface, and sunk by gunfire. 26 were lost and 33 were rescued, including the submarine's commander Kapitänleutnant Paul Just.
8 May 1945 With the surrender of Germany and the ending of hostilities, USS Bogue’s Second Barrier Force was dissolved and most of the ships, including Bogue, made for New York.
11 May 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived in New York City, New York.
20 May 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed New York bound for Norfolk.
21 May 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Norfolk, Virginia.
15 Jun 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Norfolk bound for New York.
16 Jun 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Staten Island Army Base, New York.
19 Jun 1945 Loaded with Army aircraft, escort carrier USS Bogue departed New York bound for the Panama Canal.
24 Jun 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Cristobal, Panama Canal Zone and began unloading airplanes.
27 Jun 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue transferred to the Pacific Fleet and transited the Panama Canal bound for San Diego, California.
5 Jul 1945 Escort Carrier USS Bogue arrived at North Island, San Diego, California, United States.
8 Jul 1945 After loading aircraft and personnel for transportation, escort carrier USS Bogue departed San Diego bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
14 Jul 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
15 Jul 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Pearl Harbor bound for Guam.
18 Jul 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue crossed the 180th meridian from west to east.
25 Jul 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam, Mariana Islands.
26 Jul 1945 With a load of aircraft, escort carrier USS Bogue departed Guam bound for Pearl Harbor.
4 Aug 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
5 Aug 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Pearl Harbor bound for Alameda, California.
11 Aug 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Alameda, California.
18 Aug 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Alameda bound for Adak, Alaska.
25 Aug 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Adak, Alaska.
29 Aug 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Adak, Alaska bound for Seattle, Washington.
3 Sep 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Seattle, Washington.
4 Sep 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Seattle, Washington bound for Alameda, California.
6 Sep 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Alameda, California.
7 Sep 1945 While at Alameda, Captain Jesse McClure relieved Captain Dufek as commanding officer of USS Bogue.
10 Sep 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Alameda bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
16 Sep 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
18 Sep 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Pearl Harbor bound for Alameda, California.
23 Sep 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Alameda, California and entered drydock.
11 Oct 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Alameda bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
17 Oct 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
19 Oct 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Pearl Harbor bound for Guam.
28 Oct 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam, Mariana Islands.
31 Oct 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue shifted from Guam to Saipan.
1 Nov 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Saipan bound for Pearl Harbor.
8 Nov 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
15 Nov 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Pearl Harbor bound for the Philippines.
17 Nov 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Samar, Philippines.
28 Nov 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Samar bound for Guam.
1 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam, Mariana Islands.
4 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Guam bound for Samar, Philippines.
7 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Samar, Philippines.
9 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Samar bound for Guam.
12 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam, Mariana Islands.
13 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Guam bound for Okinawa.
17 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Okinawa.
18 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Okinawa bound for Yokosuka, Japan.
21 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Yokosuka, Japan.
26 Dec 1945 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Yokosuka bound for Alameda, California.
8 Jan 1946 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Alameda, California.
14 Jan 1946 Escort carrier USS Bogue departed Alameda bound for Tacoma, Washington.
16 Jan 1946 Escort carrier USS Bogue arrived at Tacoma, Washington.
15 Feb 1946 While at Tacoma undergoing her deactivation overhaul, Commander Paul Griggs relieved Captain McClure as commanding officer of USS Bogue.
30 Nov 1946 Escort carrier USS Bogue was place out of commission at Tacoma, Washington and placed in the Reserve Fleet.
25 Jun 1960 While part of the Reserve Fleet, the former escort carrier Bogue was sold for scrap and broken up a short time later.

Photographs

The hull of what would become the escort carrier USS Bogue sliding down Way #1 at the Todd Shipyard, Tacoma, Washington, United States, 15 Jan 1942.Chaplain offering the invocation at the commissioning ceremonies for auxiliary aircraft carrier USS Bogue at Bremerton, Washington, United States, 26 Sep 1942. Note Bogue’s forward elevator.Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Bogue in Measure 21 paint scheme underway in Puget Sound, Washington, United States, 27 Oct 1942.First aircraft landing aboard USS Bogue, 30 Oct 1942 in Puget Sound, Washington, United States. The plane is a Curtiss SOC-3A Seagull flown by Bogue’s first Air Officer, Commander Jack Monroe.
See all 21 photographs of Escort Carrier Bogue (CVE-9)



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Event(s) Participated:
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» Conclusion of the Battle of the Atlantic

Escort Carrier Bogue (CVE-9) Photo Gallery
The hull of what would become the escort carrier USS Bogue sliding down Way #1 at the Todd Shipyard, Tacoma, Washington, United States, 15 Jan 1942.
See all 21 photographs of Escort Carrier Bogue (CVE-9)


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