28 Sep 1938
  • Neville Chamberlain proposed to Adolf Hitler a conference between European powers to resolve the issue of Czechoslovakia; Hermann Göring convinced Hitler to accept such an offer rather than waging war. Meanwhile, Chamberlain sent Czechoslovakian President Edvard Beneš a message to express that Britain was to represent Czechoslovakia in the upcoming conference with Germany, and Britain would keep Czechoslovakia's best interest in mind. ww2dbase [Main Article | AC]
  • Franz Halder went to see German Army chief Walther von Brauchitsch and gained some support for his planned overthrow of Adolf Hitler should there be a war over the Sudetenland crisis. At the end of the day, with Neville Chamberlain visiting Munich, Germany, and thus dramatically lessening the possibility of war between Britain and Germany, Halder called off the revolt. ww2dbase [Main Article | CPC]
Aden
  • Air Vice-Marshal Ranald Reid was made the commanding officer of British Forces Aden, succeeding Wilfred McClaughry. ww2dbase [CPC]
Italy
  • The Italian Naval Staff (Stato Maggiore Marina) formed a special research and development section at La Spezia, Italy; it was to report to 1a Flottiglia MAS, a torpedo boat flotilla. ww2dbase [CPC]
United Kingdom
  • British cruiser HMS Apollo was recommissioned as Australian cruiser HMAS Hobart. ww2dbase [Main Article | CPC]

28 Sep 1938 Interactive Map

Timeline Section Founder: Thomas Houlihan
Contributors: Alan Chanter, C. Peter Chen, Thomas Houlihan, Hugh Martyr, David Stubblebine
Special Thanks: Rory Curtis




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Famous WW2 Quote
"With Germany arming at breakneck speed, England lost in a pacifist dream, France corrupt and torn by dissension, America remote and indifferent... do you not tremble for your children?"

Winston Churchill, 1935