Alpino Bagnolini file photo [32419]

Alpino Bagnolini

CountryItaly
Ship ClassLiuzzi-class Submarine
Hull NumberBI
BuilderBuilder Cantieri Navale Tosi di Taranto, Taranto
Laid Down15 Dec 1938
Launched28 Oct 1939
Commissioned22 Dec 1939
Sunk26 Jan 1944
Displacement1,050 tons standard; 1,508 tons submerged
Length253 feet
Beam25 feet
Draft14 feet
MachineryTwo Tosi diesel engines (1,750hp), two electric motors
Speed18 knots
Crew50
Armament8x533mm torpedo tubes, 2x100mm/47cal guns, 4x13.2mm machine guns
Submerged Speed8 knots

Contributor:

ww2dbaseItalian submarine Alpino Bagnolini entered service in Dec 1939. In Jun 1940, shortly after Italy joined the European War of WW2, she became the first Italian naval vessel to sink a British warship when she sank cruiser HMS Calypso in the Mediterranean Sea south of Crete, Greece. She was relocated to the Italian submarine base in German-occupied France in the fall of 1940. In Sep 1943, after Italy capitulated, she was taken over by the German Navy and was converted into a transport submarine and was given the new name UIT-22. In Mar 1944, ULTRA decryption efforts led to her journey being discovered by the Allies, and two PBY Catalina aircraft were able to intercept and sank her in the Indian Ocean south of the Cape of Good Hope. All 43 aboard were killed.

ww2dbaseSources:
uboat.net
Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Apr 2023

Submarine Alpino Bagnolini (BI) Interactive Map

Alpino Bagnolini Operational Timeline

15 Dec 1938 The keel of Alpino Bagnolini was laid down by Cantieri Navale Tosi di Taranto in Taranto, Italy.
28 Oct 1939 Alpino Bagnolini was launched in Taranto, Italy.
22 Dec 1939 Alpino Bagnolini was completed in Taranto, Italy.
25 Apr 1940 Franco Pittoni was named the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini at Taranto, Italy.
6 Jun 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Taranto, Italy at 0110 hours, starting her first war patrol.
12 Jun 1940 Alpino Bagnolini sighted two shadows in the Mediterranean Sea 80 kilometers (50 miles) south of Cape Lithion, Crete, Greece at 0050 hours. At 0056, the commanding officer, Franco Pittoni, determined them to be enemy warships and ordered an attack on the surface. A bow torpedo was fired at 0058 hours, scoring a hit on the starboard side a minute later, and the submarine dove to avoid the expected counterattack. The target was British cruiser HMS Calypso, which sank at 0335 hours. 39 were killed. 139 survivors were picked up by HMS Caledon and 280 survivors were picked up by HMS Dainty, and they were later landed at Alexandria, Egypt.
21 Jun 1940 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Gallipoli, Apulia, Italy, ending her first war patrol. At 1320 hours, she departed Gallipoli and sailed to Taranto, arriving at 1610 hours.
5 Jul 1940 Alpino Bagnolini conducted exercises out of Taranto, Italy between 0730 and 1703 hours.
9 Jul 1940 Alpino Bagnolini conducted exercises out of Taranto, Italy between 1335 and 1900 hours.
10 Jul 1940 Alpino Bagnolini conducted exercises out of Taranto, Italy between 1115 and 1610 hours.
11 Jul 1940 Alpino Bagnolini conducted exercises out of Taranto, Italy between 1125 and 1535 hours.
12 Jul 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Taranto, Italy at 0800 hours, starting her second war patrol.
27 Jul 1940 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a submarine off Cape Santa Maria de Leuca, Italy at 0215 hours, but lost contact shortly after. Around the same time, Reginaldo Giuliani also reported a submarine in the same area. Thus, it was possible that the two Italian submarines had sighted each other. At 1200 hours, Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Taranto, Italy at 1200 hours, ending her second war patrol.
17 Aug 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Taranto, Italy at 0645 hours for exercises, returning at 1230 hours.
30 Aug 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Taranto, Italy at 0700 hours for exercises, returning at 1120 hours.
4 Sep 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Taranto, Italy at 0635 hours for exercises, returning at 1300 hours.
7 Sep 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Taranto, Italy at 1120 hours.
8 Sep 1940 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Trapani, Sicilia, Italy at 1845 hours.
9 Sep 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Trapani, Sicilia, Italy at 1850 hours, starting her third war patrol.
13 Sep 1940 Alpino Bagnolini transited the Strait of Gibraltar.
15 Sep 1940 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a destroyer in the Atlantic about 80 miles west of Cabo de São Vicente, Portugal at 1542 hours; she dove to avoid detection.
18 Sep 1940 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter 20 miles west of Porto, Portugal at 1410 hours. She submerged at 1500 hours, approached, and then identified the target as Spanish freighter Cabo Tortosa. Commanding officer Franco Pittoni considered stopping the ship and checking for papers, but the apperance of smoke on the horizon, feared to be Allied warships, led Pittoni to bypass the checking of papers and to attack the freighter. A bow torpedo hit Cabo Tortosa at 1543 hours, and she sank about 1.5 hours later. All aboard survived and were later rescued by Spanish ship Monte Ayala.
24 Sep 1940 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a Sunderland aircraft at the distance of 2,000 meters in the Atlantic Ocean. The Italian submarine fired on it with her machine guns and claimed to have hit the aircraft and forced it to turn around.
30 Sep 1940 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Bordeaux, France, ending her third war patrol.
24 Oct 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Bordeaux, France at 1100 hours, starting her fourth war patrol.
7 Nov 1940 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Bordeaux, France at 1300 hours, ending her fourth war patrol.
5 Dec 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Bordeaux, France at 1135 hours. She arrived at Pauillac, Aquitaine, France at 1615 hours for unexpected repairs.
8 Dec 1940 Alpino Bagnolini departed Pauillac, Aquitaine, France at 1345 hours, starting her fifth war patrol.
19 Dec 1940 Alpino Bagnolini sighted British freighter Amicus in the Atlantic Ocean at 1750 hours and submerged to approach. At 1915 hours, she lost sight of the target, and surfaced in order to regain contact. At 2010 hours, the Italian submarine fired a bow torpedo. At 2011 hours, with the first torpedo still traveling (the target's distance was further than the Italians had estimated), a second bow torpedo was fired. 10 seconds after the launch of the second torpedo, the first one scored a hit, sinking Amicus 20 minutes later. All 36 aboard were lost. HMS Westcott was dispatched to assist survivors, though there would be none. Commanding officer Franco mistakenly reported the name of the victim as Amiens.
1 Jan 1941 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an Allied aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1920 hours. 20 minutes later, she fired her machine guns, keeping the aircraft at an distance. The British aircraft dropped a parachute flare, which brought in the nearby armed trawler HMT Northern Pride. At 2045 hours and 2050 hours the Italian submarine detected noises with her hydrophones, and at 2135 hours she heard pings from British ASDIC, which led to commanding officer Franco Pittoni to issue the order to dive. The subsequent depth charge attack caused damage, leading to water leaks at the conning tower hatch and the forward torpedo loading hatch and damage to the gyrocompass. When the electric motors were started, the starboard motor caught on fire. The submarine was forced to surface due to the damage, and the Italians found themselves to be only 200 meters from HMT Northern Pride and two others, HMS Scimitar and HMS Skate. A stern torpedo was fired, but it missed. The Allied warships fired on the submarine at 2037 hours, but the shells passed overhead due to the close distance. Alpino Bagnolini fired two stern torpedoes as she attempted to escape, recording one possible hit, though none of the Allied ships involved in the engagement were damaged. She find a rain squall and the Allied warships lost contact with her.
2 Jan 1941 Franco Pittoni of Italian submarine Alpino Bagnolini reported serious damage and requested permission to end his war patrol early.
3 Jan 1941 A British Beaufort bomber of No. 217 Squadron RAF flown by Flight Lieutenant A. V. Hunter attacked Italian submarine Alpino Bagnolini with four 250-pound anti-submarine bombs in the Atlantic Ocean between 1900 and 1950 hours. The Italians, misidentifying the enemy as a Blenheim bomber, counterattacked with deck guns. None of them hit their intended targets.
4 Jan 1941 German minesweepers M-2 and M-10 departed Royan, Aquitaine, France at 1830 hours to make rendezvous with Italian submarine Alpino Bagnolini, but their journey was delayed and contact was not made on this date.
5 Jan 1941 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Saint-Jean-de-Luz, Aquitaine, France at 1350 hours.
6 Jan 1941 Italian submarine Alpino Bagnolini, escorted by German minesweepers M-2 and M-10, departed Saint-Jean-de-Luz, Aquitaine, France at 0645 hours. They were later joined by German minesweeper Sperrbrecher III. They arrived at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 1915 hours.
7 Jan 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 1200 hours and arrived at Pauillac, Aquitaine at 1630 hours.
8 Jan 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed Pauillac, Aquitaine, France at 1230 hours and arrived at Bordeaux, France at 1630 hours, ending her fifth war patrol.
30 Apr 1941 Franco Pittoni stepped down as the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini at Bordeaux, France.
25 May 1941 Giulio Chialamberto was named the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini at Bordeaux, France.
13 Jun 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed Bordeaux, France at 0925 hours, arriving at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 2000 hours.
14 Jun 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 0700 hours and arrived at La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1900 hours; the journey was escorted by German minesweeper Sperrbrecher 16.
16 Jun 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Rochelle, France at 0815 hours for exercises, returning at 1630 hours. On this date, her planned upcoming journey to Gdynia, occupied Poland (German: Gotenhafen) was canceled due to the upcoming German invasion of Soviet Union.
10 Jul 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1900 hours, starting her sixth war patrol.
15 Jul 1941 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a merchant ship in the Atlantic Ocean at 0758 hours. She identified the target as a ship of the American Export Line, and the pursuit was broken off.
18 Jul 1941 At 1310 hours, Alpino Bagnolini received orders to shift her patrol area in the Atlantic Ocean. At 1610 hours, she was informed of the departure of an Allied convoy, HG 68, sailing out of Gibraltar.
19 Jul 1941 Alessandro Malaspina received a report from Italian submarine Alpino Bagnolini to the base at 2245 hours, noting the discovery of an Allied convoy in the Atlantic Ocean. Alessandro Malaspina changed course toward the reported convoy.
19 Jul 1941 Alpino Bagnolini sighted of Allied convoy HG 68 in the Atlantic Ocean at 2155 hours, but lost contact when an escorting destroyer turned toward the Italian submarine and forced her to submerge.
20 Jul 1941 Alpino Bagnolini sighted Vichy French freighter Île D'Ouessant in the Atlantic Ocean at 0740 hours and did not pursue.
21 Jul 1941 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an unidentified submarine in the Atlantic Ocean at 1020 hours. At 1900 hours, she sighted a tanker and shortly after a freighter. Commanding officer Giovanni Chialamberto chose to pursue the freighter. Two bow torpedoes were fired, both of which missed. At this time, the freighter was identified as Brazilian ship Cuyaba. Chialamberto reported that Cuyaba returned fire. The Italian submarine was ordered to abandon the attack, however.
23 Jul 1941 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 1138 hours. The target was later identified as a neutral vessel, and the pursuit was abandoned.
24 Jul 1941 Alpino Bagnolini sighted Allied convoy HG 68 in the Atlantic Ocean at 0230 hours. Shortly after, she fired four bow torpedoes at a tanker (the fourth of which misfired), claiming three hits. An approaching destroyer forced the Italian submarine to break off the attack and dive. HG 68 reported no damage on that date, thus the three hits were most likely all premature detonations. At 0542 hours, she sighted another vessel, but the Italians would lose contact with that vessel, as well as the entire convoy, shortly after.
29 Jul 1941 Alpino Bagnolini sighted Allied convoy OG 69 in the Atlantic Ocean at 2135 hours. Contact was lost at 2330 hours due to darkness.
30 Jul 1941 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a destroyer in the Atlantic Ocean at 0030 hours and escaped in the darkness.
6 Aug 1941 British Catalina aircraft flown by Pilot Officer I. F. Edgar of No. 202 Squadron RAF sighted Italian submarine Alpino Bagnolini in the Atlantic Ocean at 1510 hours and attacked with two 250-pound anti-submarine bombs (one of which was stuck and could not be released) followed by strafing. The Italians counterattacked with anti-aircraft fire, hitting the port float. The aircraft then dropped another bomb, again missing the submarine. On the third run, a bomb scored a near miss on the submarine, causing battery acid spill and fuel leak. At 2345 hours, Alpino Bagnolini successfully dove and escaped from the aircraft.
12 Aug 1941 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Bordeaux, France at 1200 hours, ending her sixth war patrol.
1 Sep 1941 Giovanni Manunta was named the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini while the Italian submarine was docked at Bordeaux, France; he replaced Giulio Ghialamberto.
31 Oct 1941 Alpino Bagnolini completed a scheduled refit at Bordeaux, France.
1 Nov 1941 Mario Tei was named the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini at Bordeaux, France, replacing Giovanni Manunta.
16 Dec 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed Bordeaux, France at 1520 hours. The port propeller was caught in a cable moments after leaving the dock, and the mission was subsequently canceled.
17 Dec 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed Bordeaux, France at 0840 hours, arriving at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 1212 hours. She then performed trials between 1400 and 1830 hours.
18 Dec 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 0850 hours, arriving at La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1720 hours.
19 Dec 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 0840 hours for trials, returning at 1415 hours. At 1603, she shifted her anchorage to a different location at La Pallice.
23 Dec 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 0850 hours for trials, returning at 1825 hours.
29 Dec 1941 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1040 hours for trials, returning at 1800 hours.
8 Jan 1942 Alpino Bagnolini deprated La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 0800 hours for trials, returning at 1800 hours.
15 Jan 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a submarine in the Atlantic Ocean at 0829 hours. She readied two torpedoes, but did not fire as the unidentified target could possibly be German submarine U-373. She lost contact with the target after the target had submerged.
18 Jan 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1545 hours, starting her seventh war patrol.
14 Feb 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1001 hours; she dove to avoid detection.
20 Feb 1942 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 1422 hours, ending her seventh war patrol.
21 Feb 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 0800 hours, arriving at Bordeaux, France at 1202 hours.
22 Apr 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed Bordeaux, France at 1048 hours, arriving at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 1905 hours.
24 Apr 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 0850 hours for an overnight trial in the Le Pertuis d'Antioche strait west of La Rochelle, France.
25 Apr 1942 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 0813 hours.
26 Apr 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1500 hours, starting her eighth war patrol.
2 May 1942 Alpino Bagnolini made contact with fellow Italian submarine Comandante Cappellini in the Atlantic Ocean at 2025 hours.
3 May 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a Portuguese freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 1050 hours; no actions were taken.
12 May 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 1540 hours; she submerged to attack, but she could not close in to the target, and the attack was ultimately called off.
20 May 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1126 hours and then again at 1350 hours; she dove on both occasions to avoid detection.
21 May 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a destroyer in the Atlantic Ocean at 1115 hours, followed by an aircraft; she dove to avoid detection. At 2105 hours, she sighted a freighter at the range of 10,000 meters; she attempted to attack, but spotted a Catalina aircraft and dove to avoid detection. When she surfaced at 2240 hours, the target was no longer in sight.
22 May 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter escorted by a destroyer in the Atlantic Ocean at 1045 hours; the destroyer forced her to dive. At 1717 hours, she sighted an aircraft, and dove to avoid detection. At 1839, she sighted smoke on the horizon, and she soon noted a freighter heading in her direction. She surfaced at 2230 hours to approach at full speed, but would lose contact with the target by 2300 hours.
23 May 1942 Alpino Bagnolini attempted to use her hydrophone at 0140 hours to find a target she had sighted in the Atlantic Ocean on the previous day, but she would not succeed. At 0230 hours, she sighted two blue lights; she dove, resurfaced at 0505 hours at the range of about 800 meters, and dove again. Two depth-charges were heard, and the Italian submarine would not attempt to close again.
27 May 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a tanker in the Atlantic Ocean at 1934 hours.
28 May 1942 Alpino Bagnolini fired two bow torpedoes at 0029 hours at a tanker she had sighted in the Atlantic Ocean on the previous date; they both missed and detonated well beyond the target. At 0316 hours, two additional torpedoes were launched. An explosion was heard after 91 seconds, but no visual confirmation was possible. Commanding Officer Mario Tei chose not to approach the target again as the Italian submarine only had stern torpedoes left.
7 Jun 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 2119 hours. She attempted to close in, but would lose contact repeated in rain squalls.
8 Jun 1942 Alpino Bagnolini gave up the chase of a freighter that she had sighted on the previous date due to poor visibility at 0100 hours.
23 Jun 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1209 hours; she dove to avoid detection.
28 Jun 1942 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 0725 hours, ending her eighth war patrol. She departed at 1247 hours and arrived at Bordeaux, France at 1900 hours.
8 Jul 1942 Aldo Turcio was named the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini at Bordeaux, France; he replaced Mario Tei.
11 Aug 1942 Alpino Bagnolini completed a scheduled refit at Bordeaux, France.
12 Aug 1942 Ferdinando Corsi was named the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini at Bordeaux, France; he replaced Aldo Turcio.
2 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed Bordeaux, France at 1120 hours and arrived at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 1900 hours.
3 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 0756 hours and arrived at La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1925 hours.
5 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1105 hours for trials, returning at 1542 hours.
8 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1215 hours for trials, returning at 1625 hours.
15 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1650 hours, starting her ninth war patrol.
16 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1458 hours and then again at 1640 hours; she submerged on both occasions to avoid detection.
17 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 0950 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
18 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1041 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
21 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1304 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
28 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 2330 hours. At 2355 hours, the port side lookout sighted a destroyer. The Italian commanding officer Ferdinando Corsi ordered the launch of a stern torpedo, but the launch did not happen before the submarine had to dive to avoid being attacked by the destroyer.
29 Sep 1942 Alpino Bagnolini, detected by a destroyer on the previous date, was subjected to a depth charge attack in the Atlantic Ocean at 0007 hours, sustaining no damage. At 0110 hours, she surfaced, and sighted the destroyer at the range of 800 meters and that the freighter she was escorting was fully illuminated. Faced with being detected by the destroyer at a close range and confused whether the freighter was of a neutral nation, commanding officer Ferdinando Corsi chose to abandon the pursuit, submerge, and escape the area.
15 Oct 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a ship on the horizon in the Atlantic Ocean at 1030 hours. At 1043 hours, she identified the target as a destroyer, and submerged to avoid detection. She lost hydrophone contact with the target at 1254 hours.
18 Oct 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1554 hours; she submerged to avoid detection. At 1715 hours, she sighted four aircraft, heading toward Freetown, Sierra Leone Colony and Protectorate; she again submerged.
26 Oct 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted three aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1433 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
29 Oct 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an illuminated freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 0010 hours. An intercepted radio signal identified the ship as the Portuguese ship Cujaba, but in actuality the ship could have been the Brazilian ship Cuyaba. The Italian commanding officer Ferdinando Corsi chose not to pursue the target.
2 Nov 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 1530 hours. She identified the target as a Spanish ship and thus did not pursue.
4 Nov 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 0944 hours. She identified the target as a Spanish ship and thus did not pursue.
5 Nov 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 0520 hours. She identified the target as a Spanish ship and thus did not pursue.
7 Nov 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 0235 hours and another at 1144 hours. She identified both of the targets as Spanish and thus did not pursue.
8 Nov 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1638 hours and submerged to avoid detection.
9 Nov 1942 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a freighter in the Atlantic Ocean at 0535 hours; she identified the target as a Spanish ship and thus did not pursue. At 1426 hours, she sighted the conning tower of a submarine and she turned away to avoid detection.
17 Nov 1942 Alpino Bagnolini arrived at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 1109 hours, ending her nineth war patrol. At 1140 hours, she departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, arriving at Bordeaux, France at 1537 hours.
21 Jan 1943 Angelo Amendolia was named the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini at Bordeaux, France; he replaced Ferdinando Corsi.
30 Jan 1943 Alpino Bagnolini departed Bordeaux, France at 1225 hours, arriving at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 1617 hours.
31 Jan 1943 Alpino Bagnolini departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 0815 hours, arriving at La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 2151 hours. Prior to arrival, she performed trials in poor weather, and one sailor, Sergente Segnalatore Aldo Marchesoni, was injured while attempting to secure the port machine guns. She also took on some water through the conning tower.
2 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini began a period of repairs at La Pallice, La Rochelle, France to address the problems discovered during trials on 31 Jan 1943.
7 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini completed a period of repairs at La Pallice, La Rochelle, France.
11 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 0814 for exercises, returning at 1134 hours.
13 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 0902 for exercises, returning at 1225 hours.
14 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini departed La Pallice, La Rochelle, France at 1542 hours, starting her tenth war patrol.
19 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini detected an aircraft with her Metox radar detector in the Atlantic Ocean at 0405 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
23 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini detected an aircraft with her Metox radar detector in the Atlantic Ocean at 0600 hours; she submerged to avoid detection, and recorded six depth charge detonations at 0655 hours.
24 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini detected an aircraft with her Metox radar detector in the Atlantic Ocean at 1425 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
26 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft over the horizon in the Atlantic Ocean at 1745 hours; she submerged to avoid detection. Shortly after, the aircraft, which was an US Avenger torpedo bomber from USS Ranger piloted by Ensign G. W. Bolt of VT-4 squadron, drop two 325-pound depth charges at the altitude of 200 feet, causing minor damage to both the Italian submarine as well as the bottom of the US aircraft. The aircraft circled for ten minutes, noted no sign of the submarine's destruction, and returned to the carrier ten minutes later.
27 Feb 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a periscope in the Atlantic Ocean at 1053 hours; she turned away.
2 Mar 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1140 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
12 Mar 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1900 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
15 Mar 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1022 hours; she submerged to avoid detection. The aircraft, a Pan American Airways Clipper, sighted the submarine and reported the position. At 1430 hours, a Catalina aircraft which responded to the sighting spotted the Italian submarine, but could not attack before losing contact. At 2305 hours, the Italian submarine sighted an aircraft which was operating a search light; she submerged to avoid detection. The aircraft, an American Catalina aircraft piloted by Lieutenant Commander B. J. Prueher of VP-83 squadron, dropped four depth charges on Alpino Bagnolini's position, disabling the submarine's hydrophones.
16 Mar 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 0410 hours; she submerged to avoid detection. At 0501 hours, she resurfaced. At 0510 hours, after finding herself illuminated by a searchlight, she crash dived. She returned to the surface at 0600 hours, only to be illuminated by multiple searchlights one minute later, and she crash dived again; a megaphone was stuck in the conning tower hatch, preventing it from closing properly, and twenty tons of water entered the submarine. Unable to submerge, she made a successful escape on the surface.
17 Mar 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 2245 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
18 Mar 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a periscope in the Atlantic Ocean at 2245 hours; she turned away.
20 Mar 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted smoke in the Atlantic Ocean at 2045 hours, and lost contact with the source of it at 2237 hours.
22 Mar 1943 Alpino Bagnolini began sailing toward France to end her war patrol. En route, she sighted smoke in the Atlantic Ocean at 1340 hours, and she submerged to attack. She later identified the ship as a British destroyer. Without a working hydrophone, which was damaged from an air attack on 15 Mar 1943, it was difficult to track the target while submerged, and ultimately the target moved too far away from her for her to effectively launch an attack.
31 Mar 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1400 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
6 Apr 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 1337 hours; she submerged to avoid detection. At 1541 hours, she sighted a periscope, and the Italian submarine turned away. At 1703 hours, she sighted another aircraft, and again submerged.
7 Apr 1943 Alpino Bagnolini detected an aircraft with her Metox radar detector in the Atlantic Ocean at 0515 hours; she submerged to avoid detection.
10 Apr 1943 Alpino Bagnolini surfaced in the Atlantic Ocean at 1430 hours for radio communications. At 1630 hours, four explosions were heard to the port side, followed by four explosion on the starboard side. Submerging, her crew would soon realize that the intended target was another submarine, and the attacks would continue for some time. She surfaced at 2223 hours, and sighted an aircraft four minutes later; she submerged to avoid detection.
11 Apr 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted an aircraft in the Atlantic Ocean at 0501 hours; she submerged to avoid detection. At 1025 hours, she sighted a periscope and turned away.
12 Apr 1943 Alpino Bagnolini heard bombs detonating while submerged in the Atlantic Ocean at 0010 hours.
13 Apr 1943 Alpino Bagnolini sighted a ship in the Atlantic Ocean at 0357 hours and another at 0455, neither of which responded to her recognition signals; given her distance to the French coast, the Italian submarine assumed them to be friendly. At 1448 hours, she arrived at Bordeaux, France, ending her tenth war patrol.
22 May 1943 Ferdinando Corsi was named the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini at Bordeaux, France; he replaced Angelo Amendolia.
1 Jun 1943 Aldo Congedo was named the commanding officer of Alpino Bagnolini at Bordeaux, France, replacing Ferdinando Corsi.
29 Jul 1943 Alpino Bagnolini departed Bordeaux, France at 1630 hours, arriving at Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 2130 hours.
30 Jul 1943 Alpino Bagnolini departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 0830 hours for trials, returning at 0940 hours.
31 Jul 1943 Alpino Bagnolini departed Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Aquitaine, France at 0800 hours for exercises, returning later on the same date.
10 Sep 1943 Alpino Bagnolini was taken over by the German Navy at Bordeaux, France and was renamed UIT-22.
14 Oct 1943 UIT-22 was assigned to the German 12th Submarine Flotilla at Bordeaux, France.
26 Jan 1944 UIT-22 departed Bordeaux, France.
11 Mar 1944 The German submarine UIT-22 (formerly Italian submarine Alpino Bagnolini; Oberleutnant zur See Carl Wunderlich) was sunk by three British Catalina aircraft belonging to No. 262 Squadron SAAF in the Indian Ocean off of the Cape of Good Hope. UIT-22 was on her first patrol since the German takeover. According to records made available, this South African squadron was sent to the attack area after detailed instructions about the rendezvous point in the Indian Ocean had been deciphered. All 43 aboard the German submarine were killed

Photographs

Alpino Bagnolini arriving at Gallipoli, Italy, 21 Jun 1940




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More on Alpino Bagnolini
Event(s) Participated:
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Submarine Alpino Bagnolini (BI) Photo Gallery
Alpino Bagnolini arriving at Gallipoli, Italy, 21 Jun 1940


Famous WW2 Quote
"I have returned. By the grace of Almighty God, our forces stand again on Philippine soil."

General Douglas MacArthur at Leyte, 17 Oct 1944


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