Abandoned A6M3 aircraft on a South Pacific island, early 1943; from the 15 Apr 1943 issue of US Navy Naval Aviation News

Caption   Abandoned A6M3 aircraft on a South Pacific island, early 1943; from the 15 Apr 1943 issue of US Navy Naval Aviation News
Source   United States Navy
More on...   
A6M Zero   Main article  Photos  
Added By C. Peter Chen
Licensing  According to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



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Visitor Submitted Comments

  1. Bill says:
    9 Jun 2011 08:06:49 AM

    At the start of the Pacific war, US forces
    didn't know much about Japanese aircraft technology, and were surprised about the Zero
    teams were sent to collect Japanese planes
    found abandoned if enough parts could be found, to make some flyable, and find out the strength and weakness the Allies could develop tactics to combat it.
    Of interest was the code names for Japanese aircraft developed by Cpt. Frank McCoy and the TAIU.
    Fighters carried western boys names Bombers carried female names, trainers tree names ect. Photo shows Mitsubishi A6M3 Zero Model 32 (Hamp) had clipped wings, the model 22
    known as Zeke had standard wings like the A6M2 Model 21

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