Stilwell file photo [1009]

Joseph Stilwell

SurnameStilwell
Given NameJoseph
Born19 Mar 1883
Died12 Oct 1946
CountryUnited States
CategoryMilitary-Ground
GenderMale

Contributor:

ww2dbaseJoseph Warren Stilwell was born in Palatka, Florida, United States to Benjamin Stilwell, a businessman who held a law degree and a medical doctor degree. His mother was Mary Peene, daughter of the founder of Ben Franklin Shipping Lines. In his youth he had spent time in Florida as well as Yonkers, New York, United States. He was commissioned in the infantry in the Philippine Islands after graduating from the United States Military Academy at West Point in the state of New York in 1904, and again served in the Philippine Islands in 1912. During WW1, he served as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence in IV Corps of the American Expeditionary Forces. During the interwar years, he served three times in China, allowing him to learn Chinese fluently and to observe the tactics of the Japanese military. The third posting was perhaps his most important one in his career during which he was the military attaché of the US Legation in Beijing, China between 1935 and 1940; during this tenure he met Chiang Kaishek in Dec 1938. In between his tours of duty in China, he also held several staff officer positions in the United States where he served with future WW2 leaders such as George Marshall and Omar Bradley. As an instructor at the Infantry School at Fort Benning, one of his students drew a cartoon of Stilwell rising out of a vinegar bottle, and the name "Vinegar Joe" stuck with him for the rest of his career.

ww2dbaseA natural linguist, in addition to English and Chinese Stilwell was also fluent in French, Spanish, and Japanese. In his short tenure as an instructor at West Point, he taught some of those languages.

ww2dbaseBetween 1940 and 1941, Stilwell was the commanding officer of the 7th Division at Ford Ord, California, United States. He was a cinephile; even in the confusing month of Dec 1941 as a commander in the Los Angeles area he watched Walt Disney's animated feature "Dumbo" twice.

ww2dbaseWith the rank of lieutenant general, Stilwell returned to Asia as the commander of the American Army Forces of the China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater. Arriving in 25 Feb 1942 in India to fill this capacity, he was faced with the challenge of dealing with well-entrenched Japanese forces in Burma, Siam, Malaya, and French Indo-China. In a surprising move, he successfully negotiated with Chiang for control over the Chinese forces, and created a nominally integrated Chinese-American army. He did run into frustrations when issuing orders Chinese units, however, as divisional commanders often would not obey his orders without re-confirming with Chiang first, a bureaucracy that Chiang purposefully implemented to keep western influence in check. This, plus other experiences he had, led to Stilwell's dislike for the Chinese leadership, which he described as "oily politicians... treacherous quitters, selfish, conscienceless, unprincipled crooks"; this dislike for Chinese leaders was generally recipricated. Stilwell's confrontational attitude also brought disharmony between him and a number of other American officers, such as General Giffard of the 11th Army Group who went as far as suggesting that the Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC) should be transferred from Stilwell to Supreme Allied Command. Claire Chennault, who was able to work closely with Chiang, also did not work well with Stilwell.

ww2dbaseAs the Supreme Allied Commander of the China-Burma-India Theater (CBI Theater), Stilwell held three roles simultaneously:

ww2dbaseOn 24 Feb 1944 Stilwell launched a campaign to regain Burma. Brigadier General Frank Merrill was placed in command of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), also known as Merrill's Marauders, and successfully gained control of the Hakawing Valley, paving way to regaining the valuable airfields at Myitkyina and later reopening the supply routes into China.

ww2dbaseDuring this time in China, Stilwell was accused of nepotism for that he had assigned his son, Colonel Joseph Stilwell, to serve as his head of intelligence, while two sons-in-law were his liaisons with various Chinese military commands.

ww2dbaseIn Oct 1944, his disagreements with Chiang reached a critical level, resulting in his removal from the CBI Theater as recommended by Patrick Hurley and approved by Franklin Roosevelt. Three generals were needed to take over the three roles that Stilwell held. Stilwell was placed in command of the Tenth Army and was engaged in the final stages of the Battle of Okinawa in the Ryukyu Islands.

ww2dbaseIn Harold Alexander's 1961 memoirs, the former British general commented on Stilwell's leadership:

I don't think that Stilwell had much of an opinion of us British, but personally he and I got on well together. I always felt that he disliked his position with the Chinese: he was a very senior American general and probably had the feeling that he ought to have been playing a greater part in the war, instead of being relegated to a backwater.... Certainly, in those dark days he was no defeatist; on the contrary, he showed great courage and fight. When the campaign collapsed he found his way back to India through the jungle on foot, having done all he could for his Chinese forces.

ww2dbaseWilliam Slim also regarded Stilwell highly despite Stilwell's known bias against the British, noting:

He was not a great soldier in the highest sense, but he was a real leader in the field; no one else I know could have made his Chinese do what they did. He was, undoubtedly, the most colourful character in South East Asia - and I liked him.

ww2dbaseAlan Brooke, however, thought little of Stilwell:

[Although Stilwell] was a stouthearted fighter, suitable to lead a brigade of Chinese scallywags, I could see no qualities in him. He was a Chinese linguist, but had little military knowledge and no strategic ability of any kind. His worst failing, however, was his deep rooted hatred of anybody or anything British! It was practically impossible to establish friendly relationship with either him or the troops under his command. He did a vast amount of harm by vitiating the relations between America and British both in India and Burma.

ww2dbaseStilwell passed away in 1946 after surgery to remove stomach cancer. His ashes were scattered over the Pacific Ocean.

ww2dbaseSources:
Frank McLynn, The Burma Campaign
Nathan Prefer, Vinegar Joe's War
Wikipedia

Joseph Stilwell Timeline

19 Mar 1883 Joseph Stilwell was born in Palatka, Florida, United States.
15 Jun 1904 Joseph Stilwell graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, United States.
1 Oct 1904 Joseph Stilwell boarded US Army Transport Sheridan on the west coast of the United States.
29 Oct 1904 Joseph Stilwell disembarked US Army Transport Sheridan in the Philippine Islands.
7 Nov 1904 Joseph Stilwell arrived at Camp Jossman on the island of Guimaras in the Philippine Islands.
9 Apr 1906 Joseph Stilwell departed Philippine Islands.
15 May 1906 Joseph Stilwell arrived in the United States.
22 Aug 1906 Joseph Stilwell was assigned to the Department of Modern Languages at the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York, United States.
20 Jun 1907 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Guatemala.
9 Aug 1907 Joseph Stilwell returned to the United States.
28 Jun 1908 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Mexico.
1 Aug 1908 Joseph Stilwell returned to the United States.
25 Jun 1909 Joseph Stilwell began a trip to Honduras, Salvador, and Guatemala.
4 Aug 1909 Joseph Stilwell returned to the United States.
5 Jan 1911 Joseph Stilwell boarded US Army Transport Sherman on the west coast of the United States.
31 Jan 1911 Joseph Stilwell disembarked US Army Transport Sherman in the Philippine Islands.
1 Feb 1911 Joseph Stilwell was assigned to Fort William McKinley in Manila, Philippine Islands.
4 Jun 1911 Joseph Stilwell was assigned to Company D of 12th Infantry Regiment at Fort William McKinley in Manila, Philippine Islands.
15 Sep 1911 Joseph Stilwell departed Philippine Islands for China.
14 Dec 1911 Joseph Stilwell returned to the Philippine Islands from China.
11 Feb 1912 Joseph Stilwell returned to the United States.
30 Apr 1913 Joseph Stilwell began a period of leave in the United States.
31 May 1913 Joseph Stilwell ended a period of leave in the United States.
1 Jun 1913 Joseph Stilwell arrived at Fort Niagara, New York, United States for Army Infantry Rifle Team tryouts.
27 Jun 1913 Joseph Stilwell departed Fort Niagara, New York, United States.
18 Aug 1913 Joseph Stilwell was assigned to the Department of English and History at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, United States.
2 Jun 1914 Joseph Stilwell departed the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, United States.
3 Jun 1914 Joseph Stilwell boarded the ship Lorraine in the United States for Spain.
10 Jun 1914 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Madrid, Spain.
15 Jun 1914 Joseph Stilwell began a course in Spanish while in Madrid, Spain.
6 Aug 1914 Joseph Stilwell completed a course in the Spanish language while in Madrid, Spain.
8 Aug 1914 Joseph Stilwell boarded RMS Ivernia at Gibraltar.
20 Aug 1914 Joseph Stilwell disembarked RMS Ivernia at Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
28 Aug 1914 Joseph Stilwell was assigned to the Department of Modern Languages at the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York, United States.
22 Apr 1915 Joseph Stilwell departed the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York, United States.
26 Apr 1915 Joseph Stilwell arrived at Madison Barracks, Sackets Harbor, New York, United States.
27 Apr 1915 Joseph Stilwell was assigned to the 3rd Infantry Regiment at Madison Barracks, Sackets Harbor, New York, United States.
27 Sep 1915 Joseph Stilwell went on leave in the United States.
1 Oct 1915 Joseph Stilwell was assigend to the Department of Modern Languages at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, United States.
24 Aug 1916 Joseph Stilwell departed the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, United States.
25 Aug 1917 Joseph Stilwell was assigned to Camp Lee in Prince George County, Virginia, United States.
30 Dec 1917 Joseph Stilwell departed Camp Lee in Prince George County, Virginia, United States.
7 Jan 1918 Joseph Stilwell boarded USMS New York at New York, New York, United States.
19 Jan 1918 Joseph Stilwell disembarked USMS New York at Le Havre, France and was assigned to the AEF General Headquarters in Chaumont, France.
6 Feb 1918 Joseph Stilwell departed from the AEF General Headquarters in Chaumont, France.
10 Feb 1918 Joseph Stilwell was attached to the British 58th Division in the La Fère Sector in France.
16 Feb 1918 Joseph Stilwell was assigned to an army intelligence course at Langres, France.
28 Feb 1918 Joseph Stilwell was attached to the AEF General Headquarters in Chaumont, France.
17 Mar 1918 Joseph Stilwell departed the AEF General Headquarters in Chaumont, France.
20 Mar 1918 Joseph Stilwell was attached to the French 17th Corps in the Verdun Sector in France.
30 Apr 1918 Joseph Stilwell was attached to the AEF General Headquarters in Chaumont, France.
6 Jun 1918 Joseph Stilwell was attached the the G-2 Section of US 2nd Corps in France.
15 Jun 1918 Joseph Stilwell was temporarily unassigned from the G-2 Section of the US 2nd Corps in France.
19 Jun 1918 Joseph Stilwell was made the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, US 4th Corps in Toul Sector of France.
20 Jan 1919 Joseph Stilwell was made the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, US 4th Corps in Cochem, Germany.
23 Jun 1919 Joseph Stilwell stepped down as the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, US 4th Corps in Cochem, Germany.
15 Jul 1919 Joseph Stilwell arrived in the United States.
16 Jul 1919 Joseph Stilwell began a period of leave in the United States.
29 Aug 1919 Joseph Stilwell ended a period of leave in the United States.
29 Aug 1919 Joseph Stilwell enrolled in the University of California in Berkeley, California, United States to study Chinese.
17 May 1920 Joseph Stilwell completed a Chinese curriculum at the University of California in Berkeley, California, United States.
18 May 1920 Joseph Stilwell began a period of leave in the United States.
4 Aug 1920 Joseph Stilwell ended a period of leave in the United States.
5 Aug 1920 Joseph Stilwell boarded USAT Madawaska in California, United States.
31 Aug 1920 Joseph Stilwell disembarked USAT Madawaska at Manila, Philippine Islands.
20 Sep 1920 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Beijing, China to study Chinese.
8 Jul 1923 Joseph Stilwell boarded USAT Thomas in China.
31 Jul 1923 Joseph Stilwell disembarked USAT Thomas in the United States.
1 Aug 1923 Joseph Stilwell began a period of leave in the United States.
9 Sep 1923 Joseph Stilwell ended a period of leave in the United States.
10 Sep 1923 Joseph Stilwell enrolled in the Advanced Officer's Course, Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia, United States.
29 May 1924 Joseph Stilwell completed the Advanced Officer's Course, Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia, United States.
30 May 1924 Joseph Stilwell was made the Assistant Executive at Fort Benning, Georgia, United States.
30 May 1925 Joseph Stilwell stepped down as the Assistant Executive at Fort Benning, Georgia, United States.
31 May 1925 Joseph Stilwell began a period of leave in the United States.
21 Aug 1925 Joseph Stilwell ended a period of leave in the United States.
22 Aug 1925 Joseph Stilwell was made a Student Officer at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, United States.
30 Jun 1926 Joseph Stilwell stepped down as a Student Officer at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, United States.
20 Aug 1926 Joseph Stilwell boarded USAT Thomas in the United States.
28 Sep 1926 Joseph Stilwell disembarked USAT Thomas at Tianjin, China.
29 Sep 1926 Joseph Stilwell was assigned to the 15th Infantry Regiment in Tianjin, China.
1 Oct 1926 Joseph Stilwell was made the commanding officer of a provisional battalion of the 15th Infantry Regiment in Tianjin, China.
6 Dec 1926 Joseph Stilwell was made the commanding officer of 2nd Battalion of the 15th Infantry Regiment in Tianjin, China.
1 May 1927 Joseph Stilwell was made the executive officer of 15th Infantry Regiment in Tianjin, China.
5 Sep 1927 Joseph Stilwell departed Tianjin, China for a tour of Korea and Japan.
25 Sep 1927 Joseph Stilwell returned to Tianjin, China.
1 Nov 1927 Joseph Stilwell was made the commanding officer of a provisional battalion of the 15th Infantry Regiment in Tianjin, China.
24 Dec 1927 Joseph Stilwell was made the executive officer of 15th Infantry Regiment in Tianjin, China.
22 Feb 1928 Joseph Stilwell was made the Post Executive Officer at Tianjin, China.
1 Jul 1928 Joseph Stilwell was made the Chief of Staff of US forces in China.
22 Sep 1928 Joseph Stilwell departed Tianjin, China for a tour of Japan.
30 Oct 1928 Joseph Stilwell returned to Tianjin, China.
10 Mar 1929 Joseph Stilwell departed Tianjin, China for a tour of Korea and Japan.
1 Apr 1929 Joseph Stilwell returned to Tianjin, China.
17 Apr 1929 Joseph Stilwell boarded USAT Grant in China.
7 May 1929 Joseph Stilwell disembarked USAT Grant at San Francisco, California, United States.
14 May 1929 Joseph Stilwell departed San Francisco, California, United States.
31 May 1929 Joseph Stilwell arrived at New York, New York, United States.
1 Jun 1929 Joseph Stilwell began a period of leave in the United States.
9 Jul 1929 Joseph Stilwell ended a period of leave in the United States.
10 Jul 1929 Joseph Stilwell was made an instructor in tactics at Fort Benning, Georgia, Unietd States.
30 May 1933 Joseph Stilwell stepped down as the Chief of First Section (Tactics) at Fort Benning, Georgia, United States.
6 Jun 1933 Joseph Stilwell arrived in San Diego, California, United States.
20 Apr 1935 Joseph Stilwell began a period of leave in the United States.
4 Jun 1935 Joseph Stilwell ended a period of leave in the United States.
5 Jun 1935 Joseph Stilwell boarded USAT Grant at San Francisco, California, United States.
6 Jul 1935 Joseph Stilwell disembarked USAT Grant in China.
7 Jul 1935 Joseph Stilwell was made a military attaché to China and Siam; he was to be based in Beiping, China.
13 May 1939 Joseph Stilwell began a period of leave in China. In the following two months he would visit various locales in French Indochina; Siam; British Malaya; Java, Dutch East Indies; and the Philippine Islands.
24 Jul 1939 Joseph Stilwell boarded USAT Grant in the Philippine Islands.
14 Aug 1939 Joseph Stilwell disembarked USAT Grant in the United States.
16 Aug 1939 Joseph Stilwell began a period of leave in the United States.
23 Sep 1939 Joseph Stilwell ended a period of leave in the United States.
24 Sep 1939 Joseph Stilwell was made the commanding officer of the 3rd Brigade at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas, United States.
8 Oct 1939 Joseph Stilwell was made the Infantry Commander of the 2nd Division at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas, United States.
1 Jul 1940 Joseph Stilwell was made the commanding officer of the 7th Division at Fort Ord, Seaside, California, United States.
25 Jul 1941 Joseph Stilwell was made the commanding officer of III Corps at Presidio of Monterey, California, United States.
24 Dec 1941 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Washington, DC, United States to assist in the planning of the invasion of North Africa.
2 Jan 1942 Chiang Kaishek cabled US President Roosevelt asking the President to nominate a trusted American General to act as Chief of Staff in the China Theatre. The Americans responded by suggesting that the functions of Chief of Staff China Theatre should be combined with Commander of the China-Burma-India Theatre and Supervisor of Lend-Lease material. Brigadier-General John Magruder of the American Military Mission to China was not senior enough (and was already disillusioned with the Chinese) and when Lieutenant General Hugh A. Drum turned down the position it was finally offered to Major General Joseph W. Stilwell who reluctantly agreed to go where he was sent.
20 Jan 1942 President Roosevelt suggested to a Cabinet meeting that an air freight and alternative land route be considered for the supply of China - this task to be added to Stilwell's already considerable responsibilities.
23 Jan 1942 In Washington, DC, United States, George Marshall told Joseph Stilwell that Stilwell was definitely going to be sent to China. Stilwell began assembling a staff for his upcoming mission to China.
2 Feb 1942 US President Franklin Roosevelt officially named Joseph Stilwell as the Chief of Staff to Chiang Kaishek.
25 Feb 1942 Joseph Stilwell arrived in India.
3 Mar 1942 Joseph Stilwell met with Chiang Kaishek in Lashio, Burma. At the conclusion of the meeting Stilwell officially assumed the title of Chief of Staff to the Supreme Commander of the China Theater and Commanding General of US Army Forces in the China Theater of Operation, Burma, and India.
9 Mar 1942 Joseph Stilwell had dinner with Chiang Kaishek and his family; in a private conversation afterwards, Chiang hinted to Stilwell that he had no intention of sacrificing Chinese troops in the doomed defense of Mandalay, Burma.
12 Mar 1942 US Army Lieutenant General Joseph Stilwell was named the commander of American forces in the CBI theater.
13 Mar 1942 Joseph Stilwell met with Harold Alexander. Stilwell's diary entry for the day noted that he was unimpressed with the British general.
1 Apr 1942 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Chongqing, China, threatening to resign his post as Chiang's chief of staff over Chinese field commanders' insubordination.
19 Apr 1942 Chiang Kaishek, Song Meiling, and Joseph Stilwell met at Maymyo, Burma.
15 May 1942 Joseph Stilwell arrived in India.
3 Jun 1942 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Chongqing, China. Later on the same day, Stilwell met with Chiang Kaishek who urged for more Lend-Lease supplies; in the same meeting, Stilwell asked Chiang to purge the Chinese officer corps of those responsible for the recent poor performance in Burma.
22 Jun 1942 Joseph Stilwell was made the Comanding General, China-Burma-India Theater.
24 Jun 1942 Joseph Stilwell, with Song Meiling in his support, convinced Chiang Kaishek to agree to sending Chinese troops to India for training.
19 Jul 1942 Joseph Stilwell devised the X-Y Plan for 20 to 30 Chinese divisions to invade northern Burma with the ultimate goal being Rangoon in the south.
7 Aug 1942 Joseph Stilwell departed Chongqing, China for Delhi, India via Assam in northeastern India.
12 Aug 1942 In India, Joseph Stilwell departed Delhi for Karachi.
16 Aug 1942 In India, Joseph Stilwell departed Delhi for Ramgarh, the Chinese troops training site.
30 Aug 1942 Joseph Stilwell met with Archibald Wavell in Delhi, India, then had dinner with Lord Linlithgow.
6 Sep 1942 Joseph Stilwell departed Delhi, India for Chongqing, China.
7 Sep 1942 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Chongqing, China; later on the same day he met with Song Meiling.
21 Sep 1942 Joseph Stilwell had dinner with the Chiang household and shared photographs of the Chinese troop training at Ramgarh, India. In Stilwell's diary entry for the day, he noted that he was able to converse with Chiang Kaishek entirely in Chinese for the first time without the help of Song Meiling who usually helped in the role of translator.
27 Sep 1942 Joseph Stilwell received orders to plan for an offensive into northern Burma to open the Ledo Road and Burma Road.
15 Oct 1942 Joseph Stilwell departed Chongqing, China or Delhi, India.
17 Oct 1942 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Delhi, India.
19 Oct 1942 Joseph Stilwell convinced Archibald Wavell to commit to an offensive in Burma in cooperation with the Sino-American forces.
26 Oct 1942 Joseph Stilwell announced his intention to establish his forward base at Ledo, India for the planned offensive into Burma.
26 Jan 1943 Chiang Kaishek held a celebratory dinner for Joseph Stilwell for having recently earned the Distinguished Service Cross medal.
1 Feb 1943 Joseph Stilwell departed Chongqing, China for India.
9 Feb 1943 Chinese leaders Song Ziwen and He Yingqin, British leaders Archibald Wavell and John Dill, and American leaders Henry Arnold, Joseph Stilwell, Clayton Bissell, and Brehon Somervell met in Delhi, India.
20 Apr 1943 Joseph Stilwell was invited to join in on the meeting already arranged between Franklin Roosevelt and Claire Chennault.
21 Apr 1943 Joseph Stilwell and Claire Chennault departed Chongqing, China.
29 Apr 1943 Joseph Stilwell and Claire Chennault arrived in Washington DC, United States.
14 May 1943 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Washington DC, United States to attend the Trident Conference.
14 Jul 1943 Joseph Stilwell departed China for India.
1 Sep 1943 Chinese General He Yingqin tentatively planned to organize 45 divisions stationed in southern China into a cohesive force, Zebra Force, which Joseph Stilwell wished to establish.
7 Oct 1943 Joseph Stilwell met with the newly arrived Louis Mountbatten in Delhi, India.
15 Nov 1943 Joseph Stilwell departed Chongqing, China.
20 Nov 1943 Joseph Stilwell arrived at Cairo, Egypt and checked into the Mena House hotel.
8 Dec 1943 Joseph Stilwell departed Cairo, Egypt.
12 Dec 1943 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Chongqing, China.
16 Dec 1943 Joseph Stilwell met with Chiang Kaishek in Chongqing, China. Chiang told Stilwell that he would only allow a major Chinese offensive into Burma if the Allies could achieve a three-to-one numerical superiority against the Japanese. He also turned over full command of the two Chinese divisions training in Ramgarh, India to Stilwell, who immediately prepared them for operations in northern Burma.
18 Dec 1943 Joseph Stillwell became the first foreigner to command Chinese troops without any conditions.
20 Dec 1943 Joseph Stilwell departed Chongqing, China for Burma.
21 Dec 1943 Joseph Stilwell arrived in his field headquarters in Burma.
3 May 1944 The US Joint Chiefs of Staff directed Joseph Stilwell to make Myitkyina, Burma his primary goal, independent of SEAC, in order to develop communications with China in support of the American effort in the Pacific.
1 Aug 1944 Joseph Stilwell met with Louis Mountbatten at Kandy, Ceylon to discuss Stilwell's temporary command over Mountbatten's theater while Mountbatten planned for a trip to Britain.
30 Aug 1944 Joseph Stilwell departed Kandy, Ceylon for Delhi, India to meet with Patrick Hurley.
8 Sep 1944 Joseph Stilwell rejected Chiang Kaishek and Patrick Hurley's recommendation to march on Bhamo, Buma, citing troop exhaustion.
13 Sep 1944 Joseph Stilwell told leader Mao Zedong's envoys that he would begin to arrange Lend-Lease supplies for the Chinese communists.
19 Sep 1944 Joseph Stilwell personally handed Chiang Kaishek a message from Franklin Roosevelt which noted that Stilwell was to be given unrestricted powers in China.
1 Oct 1944 Joseph Stilwell's diary entry for this date noted that he felt he was about to be ousted by Franklin Roosevelt.
19 Oct 1944 Franklin Roosevelt relieved Joseph Stilwell from all commands in China and recalled him to the United States.
20 Oct 1944 Joseph Stilwell bid his final farewell to Chiang Kaishek at Chiang's home in Chongqing, China.
21 Oct 1944 Joseph Stilwell departed Chongqing, China in the afternoon for the United States via India.
26 Oct 1944 Joseph Stilwell officially stepped down as the Commanding General, China-Burma-India Theater.
22 Jan 1945 Joseph Stilwell arrived in the United States.
24 Jan 1945 Joseph Stilwell was made the Commanding General, Army Ground Forces.
24 May 1945 Joseph Stilwell arrived in Manila, Philippine Islands.
18 Jun 1945 Douglas MacArthur offered Joseph Stilwell the position as his chief of staff, but Stilwell turned it down, citing that he preferred to command troops.
21 Jun 1945 Joseph Stilwell stepped down as the Commanding General, Army Ground Forces.
23 Jun 1945 Joseph Stilwell accepted Douglas MacArthur's offer to make him the commanding officer of the 10th Army, which consisted of American, Canadian, Australian, and Indian troops.
15 Oct 1945 Joseph Stilwell stepped down as the commanding officer of 10th Army in Okinawa, Japan.
1 Nov 1945 Joseph Stilwell was attached to the War Equipment Board in Washington, DC, United States.
19 Jan 1946 Joseph Stilwell stepped down from his position at the War Equipment Board in Washington, DC, United States.
22 Jan 1946 Joseph Stilwell was made the commanding officer of Western Defense Command, Presidio of San Francisco, California, United States.
28 Feb 1946 Joseph Stilwell stepped down as the commanding officer of Western Defense Command, Presidio of San Francisco, California, United States.
1 Mar 1946 Joseph Stilwell was made the commanding officer of 6th Army at Presidio of San Francisco, California, United States.
25 Jun 1946 Joseph Stilwell served as an observer at the Bikini Islands for atomic bomb tests.
31 Jul 1946 Joseph Stilwell completed his mission as an observer at the Bikini Islands for atomic bomb tests, and departed for San Francisco, California, United States.
12 Oct 1946 Joseph Stilwell passed away from stomach cancer at the Presidio of San Francisco military base in San Francisco, California, United States.

Photographs

Chiang Kaishek, Song Meiling, and Joseph Stilwell at Maymyo, Burma, 19 Apr 1942, photo 1 of 3Allied Theater commander Gen Joseph Stilwell and Chinese Gen Sun Liren, Burma (now Myanmar), 1942General Stilwell inspecting a recently captured Japanese flag, 1942General Stilwell with troops in Burma, 1942
See all 96 photographs of Joseph Stilwell



Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook  Reddit
 Twitter  Digg
 Google+  Delicious
 StumbleUpon  


Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds



Visitor Submitted Comments

1. todd cleave says:
9 Oct 2005 05:04:05 PM

MI officers usually hit brick wall...So how did General Marshall come to put him in charge, invasion of North Africa? He was pulled off that detail at last minute, sent to China, by Stimson, at last minute. His fault was he wanted to get Chinese to fight Japan, not each other... Some time, look up his Report to the State Dept, 1938 on the drug business in China, effect on the people of all China. Enlightening....During the war, he had to keep plans in his head...at least five spook organizations had penetrated service staff, his logistic support at his HQ, including Japanese, and he could not clean house! He chose to fight, not go to dinner parties, sign checks, turn Lend Lease, printing press money plates over to the KMT! He took rap re 20th Air Force, Cheng-du over aviation fuel on direct orders of Hap Arnold...His strategic and tactical understanding was proven correct, re Ichigo! He knew, trusted Col. Karl Eifler from long before the war got what he wanted from Col. Eifler, Booms from the Jungle. He saw to it Chinese soldiers training at Ramgarh got their pay, on time...Amazing a real first.
I have copy, unpublished part of General Dorns memoir...most enlightening re character of both Chinese and Americans...
2. Randall Thomas says:
1 Aug 2011 05:16:10 PM

Any body have information about a poster that saterizes Vinegar Joe as the head of a Moslem court in Western Canda in 1946?
3. Commenter identity confirmed Alan Chanter says:
23 May 2015 12:07:53 AM

Nobody would want to inflict a painful death from stomach cancer on even ones worst enemy but, in the case of this man, who had been heard to call British and Indian fighting soldiers as 'Pig- **** ers' and who had once sent a favourite staff officer to tell the Chindits that they were 'yellow', there can hardly be a whole lot of sympathy.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.

Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
More on Joseph Stilwell
Event(s) Participated:
» Trident Conference
» Cairo Conference
» Second Cairo Conference
» Okinawa Campaign
» Japan's Surrender

Related Books:
» The Burma Campaign: Disaster into Triumph 1942-45
» Vinegar Joe's War

Joseph Stilwell Photo Gallery
Chiang Kaishek, Song Meiling, and Joseph Stilwell at Maymyo, Burma, 19 Apr 1942, photo 1 of 3
See all 96 photographs of Joseph Stilwell




Famous WW2 Quote
"Among the men who fought on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue."

Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, 16 Mar 1945