Deschimag file photo [28838]

Deutsche Schiff- und Maschinenbau AG

Type   Shipyard
Historical Name of Location   Bremen, Weser-Ems, Germany

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe Deutsche Schiff- und Maschinenbau (Deschimag) shipyard in Bremen, Germany had its beginnings in the firm Eisengiesserei & Maschinenbau-Anstalt Waltjen und Leonhard, which was founded in 1843. Waltjen und Leonhard had produced a myriad of products such as iron parts for bridges, floodgates, cranes, steam boilers, steam engines, and various other marine necessities. It also provided services such as an iron foundry. Waltjen und Leonhard's slogan was "for everything that can be manufactured from iron". In 1847, it completed its first passenger ship, the side-paddle steamer Roland. Founder Heinrich Leonhardt retired in 1848, and the company was renamed C. Waltjen & Co. Shortly after, the first slip, a horizontal slip of 145 meters in length by 50 meters wide, was constructed. During this time, the company also built dredgers and barges. In 1857, the second side-paddle steamer, the Werra, was completed. In 1871, the shipyard received its first order from the German Navy, which was for the torpedo boat "I", Spierentorpedoboat18. In 1872, as the German Navy indicated that it would be placing orders every year for an indefinite period of time, several Bremen merchants, bankers, politicians, and ship owners jointly started the firm Actien-Gesellschaft "Weser" (AG Weser); owner of C. Waltjen & Co., Carsten Waltjen, became a member of the AG Weser board. In 1876, AG Weser completed its first navy warship, gunboat Wespe, the lead ship of the class with ten more to be delivered. In 1883, with orders arriving from the navy, the shipyard started specializing in torpedo boat construction. By 1884, orders were arriving at an ever increasing rate and it became apparent that one slip was not enough. Between 1875 and 1884 the navy placed 29 orders for gunboats. Between 1901 and 1905, the shipyard moved from Stephanikirchenweide to a 116-acre piece of land that it would occupy until 1983. Between 1908 and 1910, one of the existing slips was expanded to include an awning of 50 meters in length and 15 meters in width, which included electric cranes. Between 1910 and 1914, in order to continue building newer vessels, especially those for the navy, the second upgrade and modernization effort of the shipyard took place. Between 1914 and 1918, during WW1, the shipyard built tankers, trawlers, patrol boats, and cargo ships, mainly for the navy; additionally, 81 submarines were built. After the conclusion of WW1, it suffered financially, much like all other German shipyards. In 1920, a 2,000-square meter shipbuilding hall was completed. In 1921, the company was transformed into a joint stock company. In Dec 1926, AG Weser stopped accepting orders as it planned to merged with other companies which were also suffering financially. In 1928, Deschimag was established, and the former AG Weser took a leadership position in the new company. Overnight, the new company became the largest shipbuiding company in Germany, its 15,000 employees representing 28% of the total workforce in that particular industry in Germany. The companies that had joined to form Deschimag were:

ww2dbaseIn Jul 1929, the Bremen, arguably the most famous of all German passenger ships, was completed at Deschimag, but the lack of new orders after this large project meant that the company had no choice but to release 5,000 workers, which represented over 40% of the company. In 1933, after almost three years, Norddeutschen Lloyd, which had placed the order for the Bremen, finally returned to place another order, the Cairo. In 1933, the Weser Flugzeugbau GmbH (Weserflug) was founded to build aviation components (and later aircraft); this company would be spun off in 1936. In 1934, shipbuilding orders from the German Navy Department began to flow in, starting with the 1934 order to build six 1935-type torpedo boats, four 1936- and 1936A-type destroyers, and an artillery training ship. This was followed by orders for eight submarines. Between 1935 and 1937, Deschimag began studies to see if additional slips could be added; the conclusion, however, was that an expansion was impossible due to the location of slips I through V (Va). In 1938, work began on two large construction dry docks. In 1939, Deschimag received the first orders from the Nazi-era Germany Navy, and for the next several years the majority of work was building minesweepers and patrol boats. In 1941, the Krupp conglomerate acquired the majority of shares in both AG Weser and G. Seebeck AG, the two main companies within Deschimag. In the summer of 1943, work stopped on the construction docks, but keel laying began again in 1944. Construction for a number of submarines were underway in 1945 when British 3rd Infantry Division captured the city in late Apr 1945. During WW2, Deschimag had a size of 604,400 square meters, and employed an average of 12,000 employees. Deschimag was dissolved after war but AG Weser and G. Seebeck AG lived on separately. AG Weser suffered furthered losses as much of its surviving heavy equipment were plundered by the Soviets. In 1949, US occupation administration allowed Seebeck to resume shipbuilding, and AG Weser followed in 1951. After a few periods of poor performance in the 1970s and 1980s, AG Weser was declared bankrupt in 1983, and G. Seebeck AG was bought out by the firm Bremer Vulkan Verbund AG.

Last Major Update: Jul 2019

Ships Constructed at Deutsche Schiff- und Maschinenbau AG

Ship NameYard NoSlip/Drydock NoOrderedLaid DownLaunchedCompleted
U-112 (Planned)17 Jan 1939
U-113 (Planned)17 Jan 1939
U-114 (Planned)17 Jan 1939
U-115 (Planned)17 Jan 1939
U-1267 Aug 1939
U-1277 Aug 1939
U-1287 Aug 1939
U-1297 Aug 1939
U-1307 Aug 1939
U-1317 Aug 1939
U-16023 Dec 1939
U-18315 Aug 1940
U-18515 Aug 1940
U-18615 Aug 1940
U-1924 Nov 1940
U-1934 Nov 1940
U-1944 Nov 1940
U-1954 Nov 1940
U-1964 Nov 1940
U-1994 Nov 1940
U-2004 Nov 1940
Z48 (Planned)115712 Jun 1943
Z49 (Planned)115812 Jun 1943
Z50 (Planned)115912 Jun 1943
Z52 (Planned)111025 Nov 1942
Z53 (Planned)111125 Nov 1942
Z54 (Planned)111225 Nov 1942
Z55 (Planned)111325 Nov 1942
Z56 (Planned)111425 Nov 1942
Komet926II7 Oct 19361 Dec 1936
Pinguin917III12 Nov 19361 Feb 1937
Z511109I25 Nov 19422 Oct 1944
U-25903X17 Dec 193428 Jun 193514 Feb 19366 Apr 1936
Z5 Paul Jacobi899X9 Jan 193515 Jul 193524 Mar 193629 Jun 1937
Z6 Theodor Riedel900XI9 Jan 193518 Jul 193522 Apr 19362 Jul 1937
U-26904X17 Dec 19341 Aug 193514 Mar 193611 May 1936
Z7 Hermann Schoemann901IX9 Jan 19357 Sep 193516 Jul 193615 Sep 1937
U-279081 Apr 193511 Nov 193524 Jun 193612 Aug 1936
U-289091 Apr 19354 Dec 193514 Jul 193612 Sep 1936
U-299101 Apr 19352 Jan 193629 Aug 193616 Nov 1936
Z8 Bruno Heinemann902I9 Jan 193514 Jan 193615 Sep 19368 Jan 1938
U-30911VII1 Apr 193524 Jan 19364 Aug 19364 Oct 1936
U-319121 Apr 19351 Mar 193625 Sep 193628 Dec 1936
U-32913VIII1 Apr 193515 Mar 193625 Feb 193715 Apr 1937
Z17 Diether von Roeder919II6 Jan 19369 Sep 193619 Aug 193729 Aug 1938
Z18 Hans Ludemann920II6 Jan 19369 Sep 19361 Dec 19378 Oct 1938
Z19 Hermann Kunne921XI6 Jan 19365 Oct 193622 Dec 193712 Jan 1939
Seydlitz940V18 Jul 193629 Dec 193619 Jan 1939
T593415 Jan 193630 Dec 193622 Nov 193723 Jan 1940
T693515 Jan 19369 Jan 193716 Dec 193730 Apr 1940
U-3994429 Jul 19366 Feb 193722 Sep 193810 Dec 1938
U-3794229 Jul 193615 Mar 193714 May 19384 Aug 1938
U-3894329 Jul 193615 Apr 19379 Aug 1938
U-4094529 Jul 19361 Jul 19379 Nov 193811 Feb 1939
Lützow941IV18 Jul 19362 Aug 19371 Jul 1939
T793615 Jan 193620 Aug 193718 Jun 193820 Dec 1939
T893715 Jan 193620 Aug 193710 Aug 19388 Oct 1939
Z20 Karl Galster922II6 Jan 193614 Sep 193715 Jun 193821 Mar 1939
U-41946IX21 Nov 193627 Nov 193728 Jan 193922 Apr 1939
Z21 Wilhelm Heidkamp923II6 Jan 193614 Dec 193720 Aug 193820 Jun 1939
U-4294721 Nov 193621 Dec 193716 Feb 193915 Jul 1939
Z22 Anton Schmitt924XI6 Jan 19363 Jan 193820 Sep 193824 Sep 1939
T1193829 Jun 19361 Jul 19381 Mar 19397 May 1940
U-4394821 Nov 193615 Aug 193823 May 193926 Aug 1939
T1293929 Jun 193620 Aug 193812 Apr 19393 Jul 1940
U-44949VII21 Nov 193615 Sep 19385 Aug 19394 Nov 1939
U-64952VIII16 Jun 193715 Nov 193820 Sep 193916 Dec 1939
Z23957XI23 Apr 193815 Nov 193815 Dec 193915 Sep 1940
U-6595316 Jun 19376 Dec 19386 Nov 193915 Dec 1940
Z24958X23 Apr 19382 Jan 19397 Mar 194023 Oct 1940
Z25959XI23 Apr 193815 Feb 193916 Mar 194030 Nov 1940
U-12295415 Dec 19375 Mar 193920 Dec 193930 Mar 1940
Z26960IX23 Apr 19381 Apr 19392 Apr 19409 Jan 1941
U-12395515 Dec 193715 Apr 19392 Mar 194030 May 1940
U-12495615 Dec 193711 Aug 19399 Mar 194011 Jun 1940
J (Planned)981V14 Apr 193915 Aug 1939 *1 Aug 1941 *1 Oct 1943 *
U-10396624 May 19386 Sep 193912 Apr 19405 Jul 1940
U-10496724 May 193810 Nov 193925 May 194018 Aug 1940
U-10596824 May 193816 Nov 193915 Jun 194010 Sep 1940
U-10696924 May 193826 Nov 193917 Jun 194024 Sep 1940
Z28962I23 Apr 193830 Nov 193920 Aug 19409 Aug 1941
U-107970V24 May 19386 Dec 19392 Jul 194030 Oct 1940
U-10897124 May 193827 Dec 193915 Jul 194022 Oct 1940
Z27961II23 Apr 193827 Dec 19391 Aug 194026 Feb 1941
U-11097324 May 19381 Feb 194025 Aug 194021 Nov 1940
U-1119768 Aug 193820 Feb 194015 Sep 194019 Dec 1940
U-10997224 May 19389 Mar 194014 Sep 19405 Dec 1940
U-669857 Aug 193920 Mar 194010 Oct 19402 Jan 1941
Z29963II23 Apr 193821 Mar 194015 Oct 194025 Jun 1941
U-679867 Aug 19395 Apr 194031 Oct 194022 Jan 1941
Z30964X23 Apr 193815 Apr 19408 Dec 194015 Nov 1941
U-689877 Aug 193920 Apr 194022 Oct 194011 Feb 1941
U-1259887 Aug 193910 May 194010 Dec 19403 Mar 1941
Z311001I19 Sep 19391 Sep 194015 May 194111 Apr 1942
U-15325 Sep 193912 Sep 19405 Apr 194119 Jul 1941
U-15425 Sep 193921 Sep 194021 Apr 19412 Aug 1941
U-15525 Sep 19391 Oct 194012 May 194123 Aug 1941
U-15625 Sep 193911 Oct 194021 May 19414 Sep 1941
U-15799925 Sep 193921 Oct 19405 Jun 194115 Sep 1941
U-158III25 Sep 19391 Nov 194021 Jun 194125 Sep 1941
Z321002II19 Sep 19391 Nov 194015 Aug 194115 Sep 1942
U-159100923 Dec 193911 Nov 19401 Jul 19414 Oct 1941
U-177101728 May 194025 Nov 19401 Oct 194114 Mar 1942
U-171101123 Dec 19391 Dec 194022 Jul 194125 Oct 1941
U-172101223 Dec 193911 Dec 194031 Jul 19415 Nov 1941
U-173101323 Dec 193921 Dec 194011 Aug 194115 Nov 1941
Z331003II19 Sep 193922 Dec 194015 Sep 19416 Feb 1943
U-178101828 May 194024 Dec 194025 Oct 194114 Feb 1942
U-174101423 Dec 19392 Jan 194121 Aug 194126 Nov 1941
Z341004IX19 Sep 193914 Jan 19415 May 19425 Jun 1943
U-179101928 May 194015 Jan 194118 Nov 19417 Mar 1942
U-175V23 Dec 193930 Jan 19412 Sep 19415 Dec 1941
U-176101623 Dec 19396 Feb 194112 Sep 194115 Dec 1941
U-180102028 May 194025 Feb 194110 Dec 194116 May 1942
U-181VII15 Aug 194015 Mar 194130 Dec 19419 May 1942
U-1821022IX15 Aug 19407 Apr 19413 Mar 194230 Jun 1942
N (Planned)New25 May 19391 Jun 1941 *1 Jun 1943 *1 Aug 1945 *
Z351005I17 Feb 19416 Jun 19412 Oct 194222 Sep 1943
U-184102415 Aug 194010 Jun 194121 Feb 194229 May 1942
U-19710434 Nov 19405 Jul 194121 May 194210 Oct 1942
U-19810444 Nov 19401 Aug 19413 Nov 1942
U-187102715 Aug 19406 Aug 194116 Mar 194227 Jul 1942
U-188102815 Aug 194018 Aug 194131 Mar 19425 Aug 1942
U-18910354 Nov 194012 Sep 19411 May 194215 Aug 1942
Z361006XI17 Feb 194115 Sep 194115 May 194319 Feb 1944
U-19010364 Nov 19407 Oct 19418 Jun 194224 Sep 1942
U-19110374 Nov 19402 Nov 19413 Jul 194220 Oct 1942
Z431029II17 Feb 19421 May 194222 Sep 194324 Mar 1944
P10 (Planned)V15 May 19391 May 1942 *1 May 1944 *1 Oct 1945 *
Z441030X1 Aug 19421 Aug 194219 Feb 1944
SP11 (Planned)IV1 Mar 1943 *1 Jun 1944 *1 Dec 1945 *
SP12 (Planned)III1 Mar 1943 *1 Jun 1944 *1 Dec 1945 *
Z461071II18 Oct 19411 Aug 1943
Z451030XI1 Sep 19431 Sep 194315 Apr 1944
U-30011160I6 Nov 194315 Apr 194430 May 194420 Jul 1944
Z471072II18 Oct 19411 May 1944
U-30081167III2 Jul 194414 Sep 194419 Oct 1944
U-30101169V13 Jul 194410 Oct 194411 Nov 1944
U-30091168V21 Jul 194429 Sep 194410 Nov 1944
U-30111170V14 Aug 194420 Oct 194421 Dec 1944
U-30151174III15 Aug 194427 Oct 194417 Dec 1944
U-30131172V18 Aug 194419 Oct 194422 Nov 1944
U-30121171IV26 Aug 194418 Oct 19444 Dec 1944
U-30141173III28 Aug 194425 Oct 194417 Dec 1944
U-30171176V2 Sep 19445 Nov 19445 Jan 1945
U-30161175V6 Sep 19442 Nov 19445 Jan 1945
U-30191178V6 Nov 194310 Sep 19447 Nov 194423 Dec 1944
U-30361195Schwimmdock V6 Nov 194322 Nov 194427 Jan 1945
U-30431202V6 Nov 194314 Dec 1944
U-30421201V11 Jun 194315 Dec 1944
U-3049V6 Nov 194330 Dec 1944
U-3048V6 Nov 194331 Dec 1944
U-3052V6 Nov 194322 Jan 1945
U-3053V6 Nov 194325 Jan 1945
U-3055I6 Nov 194325 Jan 1945
U-3054I6 Nov 194327 Jan 1945
U-3057V6 Nov 19434 Feb 1945
U-3056V6 Nov 19437 Feb 1945
U-3059III6 Nov 194315 Feb 1945
U-3058III6 Nov 194317 Feb 1945
U-30611220IV6 Nov 194324 Feb 1945
U-30601219IV6 Nov 194325 Feb 1945
U-30631222IV6 Nov 19437 Mar 1945
U-30621221IV6 Nov 19439 Mar 1945

* Projected dates; not actual

Slip/Drydock Utilization

[Con]: Construction; [FO]: Fitting Out



Deutsche Schiff- und Maschinenbau AG Interactive Map

Deutsche Schiff- und Maschinenbau AG Timeline

8 Nov 1843 Eisengiesserei & Maschinenbau-Anstalt Waltjen und Leonhard was founded in Bremen, Germany.
23 Jul 1929 The passenger ship Bremen, arguably the most famous of all German passenger ships, was launched by Deschimag in Bremen, Germany.
7 Oct 1936 The keel of Komet was laid down at the Deschimag shipyard in Bremen, Germany.
12 Nov 1936 The keel of Pinguin was laid down at the Deschimag shipyard in Bremen, Germany.
2 Aug 1937 The keel of Lützow was laid down at the Deschimag shipyard in Bremen, Germany.
1 Jul 1939 Lützow was launched at the Deschimag shipyard in Bremen, Germany.
24 Feb 1945 The keel of U-3061 was laid down on Building Ways IV at the Deschimag shipyard in Bremen, Germany.
25 Feb 1945 The keel of U-3060 was laid down on Building Ways IV at the Deschimag shipyard in Bremen, Germany.
7 Mar 1945 The keel of U-3063 was laid down on Building Ways IV at the Deschimag shipyard in Bremen, Germany.
9 Mar 1945 The keel of U-3062 was laid down on Building Ways IV at the Deschimag shipyard in Bremen, Germany.
11 Mar 1945 U-3061, still under construction, was damaged during an Allied air raid on Bremen, Germany.

Photographs

Plan of AG Weser prior to the construction of the five slips, Bremen, Germany, circa 1901Plan of AG Weser, Bremen, Germany, circa 1905Launching ceremony of SS Bremen, Deschimag shipyard, Bremen, Germany, 16 Aug 1928Launching ceremony of Seydlitz, Deschimag shipyard, Bremen, Germany, 19 Jan 1939
See all 12 photographs of Deutsche Schiff- und Maschinenbau AG



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Modern Day Location
WW2-Era Place Name Bremen, Weser-Ems, Germany
Lat/Long 53.1139, 8.7456
Deutsche Schiff- und Maschinenbau AG Photo Gallery
Plan of AG Weser prior to the construction of the five slips, Bremen, Germany, circa 1901
See all 12 photographs of Deutsche Schiff- und Maschinenbau AG




Famous WW2 Quote
"Among the men who fought on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue."

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