Tenryu file photo [1887]

Tenryu

CountryJapan
Ship ClassTenryu-class Light Cruiser
BuilderYokosuka Naval Arsenal
Laid Down7 May 1917
Launched11 Mar 1918
Commissioned20 Nov 1919
Sunk18 Dec 1942
Displacement4011 tons standard; 4420 tons full
Length468 feet
Beam40 feet
Draft13 feet
MachineryBrown-Curtis geared turbine engines 10 Kampon boilers, 3 shafts
Bunkerage920t oil, 150t coal
Power Output51000 SHP
Speed33 knots
Range5,000nm at 14 knots
Crew367
Armament4x14cm/50 guns, 1x8cm/40 gun, 2x2x13mm Type 93 machine guns, 2x2x25mm Type 96 machine guns, 2x3x533mm torpedo tubes, 6 torpedoes
Armor63mm belt, 25mm deck, 51mm conning tower

Contributor:

ww2dbaseTenryu was completed in late 1919 and shortly after was made the flagship of 2nd Destroyer Squadron of the Japanese 2nd Fleet, a role that she was purpose-built to fill, having light armament and fast speed. She patrolled the eastern coast of Russia in 1920, serving as a troop transport during the Siberian Intervention conflict on several occasions. In 1927, she protected Japanese interests in the Shanghai, China area, off the mouth of the Yangtze River. In 1928, she returned to Japan to serve as a training vessel, remaining in this role until 1931. Between Oct 1931 and Oct 1933, she was again assigned to China; during this time she saw combat during the First Battle of Shanghai of 1932. In Nov 1936, Tenryu and her sister ship Tatsuta were assigned to 10th Cruiser Squadron of Japanese 3rd Fleet. At the start of WW2 in Asia, she supported the landings at Shanghai in 1937, Xiamen in 1938, and Guangzhou in 1938. In late 1940, she was drydocked for modernization, which saw the replacement of her coal-oil boilers and the installation of additional anti-aircraft weaponry. In Sep 1941, she was transferred to Truk, Caroline Islands to join Cruiser Division 18 of Japanese 4th Fleet in preparation of aggression against the Western Allies. At the outbreak of the Pacific War, she supported the landings at Wake Atoll; Kavieng, New Ireland; Gasmata and Rabaul, New Britain; Admiralty Islands; and other locations in Central and South Pacific. Tenryu sailed with the Port Moresby, Australian Papua occupation fleet, but Operation Mo was ultimately canceled due to the result of the Battle of Coral Sea. On 20 Jul 1942, she covered the landings at Buna, Australian Papua; she came under attack by US B-17 and B-26 bombers on her return back to Rabaul in New Britain, but did not incur any damage. On 9 Aug 1942, she saw action in the Battle of Savo Island, during which she sank USS Quincy with two torpedoes and contributed to the sinking of USS Astoria, USS Vincennes, and HMAS Canberra; she suffered a hit by USS Chicago, which killed 23. Later that month, she covered the landing of Kure No. 5 Special Naval Landing Force troops at Milne Bay, Australian Papua; she would return in the area to evacuate surviving troops after this campaign failed. In the coming weeks, she delivered supplies from Rabaul to Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands and evacuated troops in the reverse direction. On 14 Nov, while sailing with a task force for the bombardment of Guadalcanal, she came under attack by US submarine and US carrier aircraft; she escaped the engagement unscathed but the same could not be said for other ships of the task force. On 18 Dec 1942, after successfully delivering troops and supplies to Madang, Australian New Guinea, the supply convoy returning to Truk was attacked by US submarine USS Albacore. Tenryu was hit by one torpedo in the stern and sank. 33 were lost in the sinking.

ww2dbaseSources:
Naval Historical Center
Wikipedia

Light Cruiser Tenryu Interactive Map

Tenryu Operational Timeline

7 May 1917 The keel of Tenryu was laid down at the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, Japan.
11 Mar 1918 Tenryu was launched at the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, Japan. Commander Kanzo Kakuta was named the Chief Equipping Officer.
20 Nov 1919 Tenryu was commissioned into service and was assigned to Kure Naval District in Japan. Commander Teijiro Murase was named her first commanding officer.
1 Dec 1919 Tenryu was named the flagship of Destroyer Squadron 2 of Japanese 2nd Fleet.
20 Apr 1920 Tenryu was transferred to the reserves at Kure, Japan.
29 Aug 1920 Tenryu departed Yokosuka, Japan for eastern Russia.
7 Sep 1920 Tenryu arrived at Otaru, Hokkaido, Japan.
20 Apr 1921 Tenryu was placed in reserve at Kure, Japan for the installation of radio direction finder equipment.
1 Dec 1921 Tenryu was recommissioned into service and was assigned to Destroyer Squadron 1 of Japanese 1st Fleet. Captain Noriyoshi Yoko was named her commanding officer.
26 Jun 1922 Tenryu departed Inchon, Korea for Lushunkou, northeastern China.
4 Jul 1922 Tenryu arrived at Lushunkou, northeastern China.
29 Aug 1922 Tenryu departed Kure, Japan for eastern Russia.
10 Sep 1922 Tenryu arrived at Otaru, Hokkaido, Japan.
1 Dec 1922 Captain Hajime Matsushita was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
15 Oct 1923 Commander Shinichi Oguri was named the acting commanding officer of Tenryu.
1 Dec 1923 Shinichi Oguri was promoted to the rank of captain, and he was formally named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
1 Dec 1924 Captain Yoshio Takita was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
20 Oct 1925 Captain Shinpei Kida was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
1 Dec 1925 Tenryu was placed in reserve at Kure, Japan. captain Isao Monai was named her commanding officer.
11 Nov 1926 Captain Seishichi Yamaguchi was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
5 Feb 1927 Tenryu was dispatched to China to patrol the mouth of the Yangtze River.
15 Nov 1927 Captain Shigeru Kikuno was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
1 Dec 1928 Tenryu was assigned to Kure, Japan as a training vessel for the Japanese Navy Academy and Submarine School.
10 Dec 1928 Captain Yorio Sawamoto was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
20 Aug 1929 Captain Ibo Takahashi was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
1 Nov 1929 Captain Yoshio Hachiya was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
1 Dec 1930 Captain Kensuke Madareme was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
9 Oct 1931 Tenryu was ordered to patrol waters off the mouth of the Yangtze River in China as a part of Japanese 3rd Fleet.
15 Nov 1932 Captain Minoru Tayui was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
1 Nov 1933 Captain Masao Kanazawa was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
25 May 1934 Captain Toru Izawa was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
15 Nov 1934 Captain Sueaki Kasuga was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
21 Nov 1935 Captain Michiaki Kamata was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
15 Feb 1936 Captain Kyuhachi Kudo was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
10 Nov 1936 Captain Kanji Ugaki was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
2 Aug 1937 Captain Koso Abe was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
8 Sep 1937 Tenryu entered Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Japan to receive additional Type 92 7.7-millimeter machine guns.
10 Sep 1937 Tenryu completed her upgrade at Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Japan.
10 May 1938 Tenryu provided naval gunfire support for the amphibious assault at Xiamen, China.
1 Jul 1938 Tenryu supported the landing of Japanese troops near Guangzhou, China.
14 Dec 1938 Tenryu was recalled from China and was assigned to the reserves.
15 Dec 1938 Captain Sadanao Yamazaki was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
15 Nov 1939 Captain Zensuke Kanome was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
1 Dec 1939 Tenryu was assigned to Maizuru Naval District, Japan for service as a guard ship and training vessel for the Japanese Navy Engineering Academy.
15 Nov 1940 Tenryu began a period of modernization, replacing her coal boilers and receiving better anti-aircraft weaponry. Captain Yuji Takahishi was named her new commanding officer.
28 Aug 1941 Tenryu was assigned to Truk, Caroline Islands to join Cruiser Division 18 of Japanese 4th Fleet. Captain Mitsutaro Goto was named her new commanding officer.
12 Sep 1941 Tenryu arrived at Truk, Caroline Islands.
8 Dec 1941 Tenryu departed Roi-Namur, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands.
11 Dec 1941 While bombarding US installations at Wake Atoll, Tenryu was strafed by a US Marine Corps F4F-3 Wildcat fighter, wounding 5 sailors and mildly damaged three torpedoes in the No. 1 mount.
13 Dec 1941 Tenryu arrived at Roi, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands.
27 Dec 1941 Tenryu arrived at Roi, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands.
29 Dec 1941 Tenryu departed Roi, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands.
3 Jan 1942 Tenryu arrived at Truk, Caroline Islands. In the subsequent days she would receive two depth charge throwers and two depth charge rails at the stern.
20 Jan 1942 Tenryu departed Truk, Caroline Islands for the invasion of Kavieng, New Ireland.
23 Jan 1942 Tenryu covered transport ships as the transports disembarked troops of No. 2 Maizuru Special Naval Landing Force at Kavieng, New Ireland.
3 Feb 1942 Tenryu departed Kavieng, New Ireland and provided support for the landings at nearby Gasmata, New Britain.
13 Feb 1942 Tenryu departed Gasmata, New Britain.
19 Feb 1942 Tenryu arrived at Truk, Caroline Islands to receive additional anti-aircraft weaponry.
20 Feb 1942 Tenryu interrupted her anti-aircraft weaponry refitting at Truk, Caroline Islands to sortie for American raiders.
23 Feb 1942 Tenryu gave up her search for American raiders and returned to Truk, Caroline Islands.
27 Feb 1942 Tenryu completed her anti-aircraft weaponry refitting at Truk, Caroline Islands.
2 Mar 1942 Tenryu departed Truk, Caroline Islands.
5 Mar 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain and departed for Australian New Guinea island later in the day.
8 Mar 1942 Tenryu provided cover for the landings at Lae and Salamaua, Australian New Guinea.
9 Mar 1942 Tenryu arrived at Buka island, Bougainville, Solomon Islands.
11 Mar 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain.
14 Mar 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain.
15 Mar 1942 Tenryu arrived at Buka island, Bougainville, Solomon Islands.
17 Mar 1942 Tenryu departed Buka island, Bougainville, Solomon Islands.
18 Mar 1942 Tenryu arrived at Kavieng, New Ireland.
26 Mar 1942 Tenryu departed Kavieng, New Ireland.
27 Mar 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain.
28 Mar 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain.
30 Mar 1942 Tenryu provided cover for the landings at Shortland island, Solomon Islands.
31 Mar 1942 Tenryu provided cover for the landings at Kieta, Bougainville, Solomon Islands.
1 Apr 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain, refueled, and departed later in the day.
2 Apr 1942 Tenryu arrived at Kavieng, New Ireland.
5 Apr 1942 Tenryu departed Kavieng, New Ireland.
7 Apr 1942 Tenryu arrived at Manus, Admiralty Islands.
8 Apr 1942 Tenryu departed Manus, Admiralty Islands.
10 Apr 1942 Tenryu arrived at Truk, Caroline Islands.
29 Apr 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain.
3 May 1942 Tenryu provided cover for the landings at Santa Isabel Island, Solomon Islands.
5 May 1942 Tenryu arrived at Deboyne Islands 200 kilometers east of the tip of Australian Papua.
13 May 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain.
23 May 1942 Tenryu arrived at Maizuru, Japan.
3 Jun 1942 Tenryu entered drydock No. 3 at Maizuru Naval Arsenal, Japan for the installation of additional anti-aircraft weaponry and armor.
5 Jun 1942 Captain Shinpei Asano was named the commanding officer of Tenryu while the ship was undergoing upgrades at Maizuro Naval Arsenal, Japan.
13 Jun 1942 Tenryu exited drydock No. 3 at Maizuru Naval Arsenal, Japan.
15 Jun 1942 Tenryu departed Maizuru, Japan.
23 Jun 1942 Tenryu arrived at Truk, Caroline Islands.
6 Jul 1942 Tenryu escorted a convoy (containing an engineering battalion tasked with setting up an airfield) to Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
20 Jul 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain for Buna, Australian Papua.
21 Jul 1942 Tenryu provided cover for the landings at Buna, Australian Papua.
24 Jul 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain.
7 Aug 1942 Tenryu departed Kavieng, New Ireland with five other cruisers for Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands; the force was spotted by USS S-38, but the submarine could not gain a favorable attack position.
17 Aug 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain.
18 Aug 1942 Tenryu arrived at Basabua, Australian New Guinea.
24 Aug 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain.
25 Aug 1942 Tenryu covered the landing of 1,200 troops of the Kure No. 5 Special Naval Landing Force at Milne Bay, Australian Papua.
28 Aug 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain, departing for Milne Bay, Australian Papua later in the day.
29 Aug 1942 Tenryu arrived at Milne Bay, Australian Papua.
30 Aug 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain.
5 Sep 1942 Tenryu embarked surviving Special Naval Landing Force troops at Milne Bay, Australian Papua.
6 Sep 1942 Tenryu embarked surviving Special Naval Landing Force troops at Milne Bay, Australian Papua.
11 Sep 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain in search of survivors of sunken destroyer Yayoi; she would fail to locate any.
12 Sep 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain.
18 Sep 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain.
20 Sep 1942 Tenryu arrived at Truk, Caroline Islands.
21 Sep 1942 Tenryu embarked 56 Type 3 Model 1 naval mines as cargo while at Truk, Caroline Islands; these mines were mine for Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
22 Sep 1942 Tenryu departed Truk, Caroline Islands.
24 Sep 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain.
1 Oct 1942 Tenryu disembarked her cargo of 56 Type 3 Model 1 naval mines at Rabaul, New Britain.
2 Oct 1942 USAAF B-17 Flying Fortress bombers of 19th Bomb Group of US 5th Air Force from Port Moresby, Australian Papua attacked Rabaul, New Britain between 0440 and 0510 hours, damaging Japanese light cruiser Tenryu with a hit at the stern, killing 22 and wounding 26. Auxiliary repair ship Hakkai Maru would provide Tenryu with temporary repairs.
20 Oct 1942 Hakkai Maru completed temporary repairs for Tenryu at Rabaul, New Britain.
21 Oct 1942 Tenryu conducted post-repair trials off Rabaul, New Britain. Upon returning to port, a damaged 8-centimeter anti-aircraft gun mount was replaced.
25 Oct 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain.
26 Oct 1942 Tenryu evacuated 260 Sasebo No. 5 Special Naval Landing Force troops from Welle Island (now Sanaroa), D'Entrecasteaux Islands, Australian Papua.
27 Oct 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain.
31 Oct 1942 Tenryu departed Rabaul, New Britain.
1 Nov 1942 Tenryu arrived at Shortland Island, Solomon Islands. Later in the day, reassigned to a supply unit, she embarked food, ammunition, and troops of Japanese 38th Infantry Division.
2 Nov 1942 Tenryu departed Shortland Island, Solomon Islands and arrived at Tassafaronga Point, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. She disembarked food, ammunition, and troops of Japanese 38th Infantry Division.
3 Nov 1942 Tenryu arrived at Shortland Island, Solomon Islands.
4 Nov 1942 Tenryu departed Shortland Islands, Solomon Islands with supplies for troops fighting on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
5 Nov 1942 Tenryu arrived at Cape Esperance, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands and disembarked supplies.
6 Nov 1942 Tenryu arrived at Shortland Island, Solomon Islands.
7 Nov 1942 Tenryu departed Shortland Island, Solomon Islands with supplies for troops fighting on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
8 Nov 1942 Tenryu arrived at Tassafaronga Point, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands and disembarked supplies. On her return voyage to Shortland Island, Solomon Islands, she was attacked by US motor torpedo boats PT-37, PT-39, and PT-61, but they failed to cause any damage.
9 Nov 1942 Tenryu arrived at Shortland Island, Solomon Islands.
13 Nov 1942 Tenryu departed Shortland Island, Solomon Islands.
15 Nov 1942 Tenryu arrived at Shortland Island, Solomon Islands.
22 Nov 1942 Tenryu departed Shortland Island, Solomon Islands.
23 Nov 1942 Tenryu arrived at Rabaul, New Britain and was named the flagship of Cruiser Division 18 under Rear Admiral Mitsuharu Matsuyama.
5 Dec 1942 Captain Mitsuharu Ueda was named the commanding officer of Tenryu.
16 Dec 1942 Tenryu departed with supplies and troops onboard for Madang, Australian New Guinea.
1 Feb 1943 Tenryu was struck from the navy list.

Photographs

Tenryu under construction, Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, Japan, 1919Tenryu underway, circa late 1919Tenryu at an anchorage, late 1919Tenryu underway during trials, 1919
See all 16 photographs of Light Cruiser Tenryu



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More on Tenryu
Event(s) Participated:
» First Battle of Shanghai
» Second Battle of Shanghai
» Battle of Xiamen
» Battle of Wake Island
» New Guinea-Papua Campaign, Phase 1, Bismarck Islands
» New Guinea-Papua Campaign, Phase 2
» Battle of Coral Sea
» Guadalcanal Campaign
» Solomon Islands Campaign

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Tenryu under construction, Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, Japan, 1919
See all 16 photographs of Light Cruiser Tenryu




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