Iowa file photo [1485]

Iowa-class Battleship

CountryUnited States
Ships in Class6
BuildersNew York Navy Yard: 3
Philadelphia Navy Yard: 2
Norfolk Navy Yard: 1

Contributor:

This article refers to the entire Iowa-class; it is not about an individual vessel.

ww2dbaseIn Mar 1938, a recommendation from the mixed civilian-military US Battleship Design Advisory Board to start a new design study for a new generation of battleships was accepted. Meanwhile, in May 1938, the US Congress passed the Second Vinson Act which provided additional funding to the US Navy for the construction of new battleships. The lead ship of the class, Iowa, was ordered on 1 Jul 1939, and the order for the second ship, New Jersey, came three days later. They were commissioned in Feb and May 1943, respectively, and later joined by the commission of USS Wisconsin and USS Missouri in 1944. The four Iowa-class battleships cost approximately US$100,000,000 each. They carried heavy armor protection, although their armor was inadequate against 16-inch (406-millimeter) guns that they carried (such was a design philosophy some preceding dreadnought, battlecruiser, and battleship designs abided by); they could have carried even thicker armor, but that was sacrificed from the design in order to improve the ships' speed. The nine 16-inch guns they each carried had the capability of firing shells weighing 1,900 to 2,700 pounds (850 to 1,200 kilograms) at targets as far as about 23 nautical miles (about 40 kilometers) away. They carried additional armaments of 5-inch (127-millimeter) dual-purpose guns, 40-millimeter Bofors guns, 20-millimeter Oerlikon guns (which replaced M2 Browning machine guns in 1941), and others. Their beam measurement was carefully limited so that they could pass through the 110-foot (34 meter) wide locks of the Panama Canal. During WW2, all four Iowa-class battleships operated in the Pacific Ocean against Japanese forces, serving in the primary function of being escorts to fleet carriers, meanwhile they also bombarded shore positions. In the latter role, they famously bombarded Japanese military and industrial facilities chose to shore, destroying the Japanese capacity to make war as well as destroying Japanese morale. Two additional ships, named Illinois and Kentucky, were laid down as Iowa-class battleships, but they were never completed. At the end of the war, USS Missouri became the symbol of US naval power as she hosted the main Japanese surrender ceremony in Tokyo Bay. The four Iowa-class battleships served in similar capacities (ie. carrier escort and shore bombardment) during the Korean War before being decommissioned later in the 1950s. Also in the 1950s, the W23 nuclear artillery shell, an adaptation of the W19 nuclear artillery shell, was developed specifically for the 16-inch guns of the Iowa-class battleships, making their naval guns the largest nuclear artillery pieces in the world, although it was unknown if any of the four battleships ever carried nuclear shells. Recommissioned and modernized several times during the Cold War era and into the 1990s, they fired a variety of weapons ranging from their original 16-inch guns to advanced cruise missiles from waters off Vietnam to waters off Iraq. The end of the Gulf War of 1990-1991 and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 led to end of the Iowa-class battleships' careers. By 2012, all four Iowa-class battleships were stricken from the US Naval Vessel Register and had become museum ships accessible to the general public.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: May 2014

Iowa-class Battleship Interactive Map

Iowa-class Battleship Operational Timeline

1 Jul 1939 The order for the construction of battleships Iowa and New Jersey was issued.
12 Jun 1940 The order for the construction of battleships Missouri and Wisconsin was issued.
27 Jun 1940 The keel for battleship Iowa was laid down at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard in New York, United States.
9 Sep 1940 The order for the construction of Illinois and Kentucky was issued.
6 Jan 1941 The keel of battleship Missouri was laid down.
7 May 1942 The keel of Kentucky was laid down at Norfolk Navy Yard in Virginia, United States.
27 Aug 1942 Battleship Iowa was launched in Brooklyn, New York, United States, sponsored by Ilo Wallace, wife of Vice President Henry Wallace.
6 Dec 1942 The keel of Illinois was laid down at Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, United States.
22 Feb 1943 Iowa was commissioned into service at Brooklyn Naval Shipyard in New York, United States with Captain John L. McCrea in command.
24 Feb 1943 USS Iowa began her shakedown cruise in Chesapeake Bay on the east coast of the United States.
23 May 1943 USS New Jersey was commissioned into service at Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, United States.
27 Aug 1943 USS Iowa departed for Argentia, Newfoundland.
14 Nov 1943 USS Iowa conducted an anti-aircraft and anti-torpedo exercise. A torpedo from destroyer USS William D. Porter nearly hit the battleship by mistake while US President Franklin Roosevelt was on board.
16 Dec 1943 USS Iowa disembarked US President Franklin Roosevelt.
2 Jan 1944 USS Iowa departed the east coast of the United States for the Pacific Ocean.
7 Jan 1944 USS Iowa transited the Panama Canal.
25 Jan 1944 The newly operational battleship, USS New Jersey (Captain Carl F. Holden), joined Rear Admiral Frederick C. Sherman's TG58.3 (Group Three of Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher's Task Force 58) in time to participate in Operation Flintlock, the occupation of the Marshall Islands.
29 Jan 1944 Battleship Missouri was launched, sponsored by Mary Magaret Truman, daughter of Senator Harry Truman.
16 Feb 1944 USS Iowa was detached to raid Japanese shipping in the Truk, Caroline Islands area.
19 Feb 1944 Armed merchant cruiser Akagi Maru, cruiser Katori, destroyer Maikaze, destroyer Nowaki, and minesweeping trawler Shonan Maru No. 15 departed Truk, Caroline Islands at 0430 hours for Yokosuka, Japan. After 0500 hours, Truk came under attack by many US carrier aircraft. A number of aircraft spotted the group and attacked, sinking Akagi Maru and damaging Katori and Maikaze; at least one US F6F fighter was shot down during the attack on this group. Battleship New Jersey, battleship Iowa, cruiser Minneapolos, cruiser New Orleans, destroyer Bradford, and destroyer Burns then approached at about 1300 hours about 64 kilometers (40 miles) northwest of Truk. Maikaze fired a spread of torpedoes, which missed the two battleships. Gunfire from Minneapolis and New Orleans started a fire on Maikaze, causing an explosion, and leading to her sinking at 1343 hours; all aboard were lost. Then, New Jersey sank Shonan Maru No. 15 with her port side 5-inch battery. Next, Iowa opened fire on Katori, straddling Katori with the first salvo. Katori fired torpedoes, but all of them missed. Iowa's gunfire eventually overwhelmed and sank Katori; Captain Tamekiyo Oda was among those killed. Nowaki alone escaped the attack.
21 Feb 1944 USS Iowa was assigned to escort the Fast Carrier Task Force during a raid in the Mariana Islands.
18 Mar 1944 USS Iowa bombarded Mili Atoll, Marshall Islands. She was hit by two 120-millimeter shells from Japanese coastal guns during the bombardment, suffering minor damage.
30 Mar 1944 USS Iowa joined Task Force 58.
16 Apr 1944 Wisconsin was commissioned into service.
22 Apr 1944 USS Iowa began to escort carriers while the aircraft struck Japanese positions on New Guinea, Dutch East Indies.
28 Apr 1944 USS Iowa completed her escort mission for carriers off New Guinea, Dutch East Indies.
11 Jun 1944 Missouri was commissioned into service.
12 Jun 1944 USS Iowa escroted carriers while the aircraft struck Japanese positions in the Mariana Islands.
13 Jun 1944 USS Iowa bombarded Saipan and Tinian, Mariana Islands.
7 Jul 1944 USS Wisconsin departed Norfolk, Virginia, United States for Trinidad in the British West Indies.
24 Sep 1944 USS Wisconsin departed Philadelphia Navy Yard in Pennsylvania, United States.
27 Sep 1944 Battleship USS Wisconsin, with cruiser USS Pasadena, departed Delaware Bay, United States bound for the Panama Canal and the Pacific.
2 Oct 1944 USS Wisconsin was attached to the US Navy Pacific Fleet.
10 Oct 1944 USS Iowa arrived off Okinawa, Japan to cover carriers while the carrier aircraft struck targets in the Ryukyu Islands and Taiwan.
9 Dec 1944 USS Wisconsin was attached to the US Navy Third Fleet.
14 Dec 1944 USS Missouri departed Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
18 Dec 1944 Many ships from the United States Third Fleet, Task Force 38 sailed into Typhoon Cobra in the Philippine Sea. Three destroyers and 790 men were lost.
24 Dec 1944 USS Missouri arrived at San Francisco, California, United States.
2 Jan 1945 USS Missouri departed US Territory of Hawaii for Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
15 Jan 1945 USS Iowa arrived at San Francisco, California, United States.
26 Jan 1945 Captain Edmund Wooldridge was named the commanding officer of USS New Jersey.
17 Feb 1945 USS Wisconsin arrived off Iwo Jima, Japan and bombarded Japanese positions on the island.
19 Feb 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Iwo Jima, Japan.
25 Feb 1945 USS Wisconsin escorted carriers as the carrier aircraft attacked Hachino, Japan.
5 Mar 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
14 Mar 1945 USS Missouri departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
18 Mar 1945 USS Missouri escorted carriers while the aircraft aircraft struck Japan.
19 Mar 1945 USS Iowa departed San Francisco, California, United States.
22 Mar 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
24 Mar 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Okinawa, Japan.
24 Mar 1945 USS Wisconsin bombarded Okinawa, Japan.
1 Apr 1945 USS Missouri covered the landings at Okinawa, Japan.
11 Apr 1945 A Japanese special attack aircraft crashed into the starboard side of USS Missouri, causing minor damage. The remains of the Japanese pilot was given a sea burial with military honors.
15 Apr 1945 USS Iowa arrived at Okinawa, Japan.
16 Apr 1945 A special attack aircraft dove at USS Missouri off Okinawa, Japan. Falling astern of the battleship, the attack caused only minor shock and fragment damage.
5 May 1945 USS Missouri departed Okinawa, Japan.
5 May 1945 USS New Jersey arrived at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for an overhaul.
9 May 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
18 May 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam, Mariana Islands. In the afternoon, she became the flagship of Admiral William Halsey of the US Navy 3rd Fleet.
21 May 1945 USS Missouri departed Guam, Mariana Islands.
25 May 1945 USS Iowa arrived off Kyushu, Japan.
27 May 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Japanese positions on Okinawa, Japan.
8 Jun 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Kyushu, Japan.
9 Jun 1945 USS Wisconsin was designated a training ship for a cruise to Britain, France, and Cuba.
13 Jun 1945 USS Iowa departed waters off Kyushu, Japan for waters off northern Japan.
13 Jun 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Japanese positions on Luzon, Philippine Islands.
13 Jun 1945 USS Wisconsin arrived at Leyte Gulf, Philippine Islands for repairs.
1 Jul 1945 USS Wisconsin completed her repairs at Leyte Gulf, Philippine Islands.
4 Jul 1945 USS New Jersey departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.
8 Jul 1945 USS Missouri set sail as an escort for carriers.
13 Jul 1945 USS Missouri escorted carriers while the aircraft struck Japan.
14 Jul 1945 USS Missouri escorted carriers while the aircraft struck Japan.
11 Aug 1945 The construction of Illinois at Philadelphia Navy Yard in Pennsylvania, United States was canceled.
16 Aug 1945 British Admiral Bruce Fraser visited USS Missouri.
21 Aug 1945 USS Missouri dispatched a 200-men party to USS Iowa for temporary duty with the initial occupation force for Tokyo, Japan.
27 Aug 1945 USS Iowa arrived at Sagami Bay, Japan.
29 Aug 1945 USS Missouri entered Tokyo Bay, Japan.
2 Sep 1945 Japan signed the surrender document aboard USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, Japan. Later on the same day, the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters issued General Order No. 1 written by US Joint Chiefs of Staff, which instructed Japanese forces on matters of surrender.
5 Sep 1945 USS Missouri was relieved of duty as Admiral William Halsey's flagship.
5 Sep 1945 USS Wisconsin arrived in Tokyo Bay, Japan.
6 Sep 1945 USS Missouri departed Tokyo Bay, Japan.
20 Sep 1945 USS Iowa departed Tokyo Bay, Japan with US servicemen and liberated prisoners of war on board.
20 Sep 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
15 Oct 1945 USS Iowa arrived at Seattle, Washington, United States.
15 Oct 1945 USS Wisconsin arrived at San Francisco, California, United States.
23 Oct 1945 USS Missouri arrived at New York, New York, United States.
27 Oct 1945 USS Missouri hosted US President Harry Truman for the annual Navy Day ceremonies at New York, New York, United States.
15 Nov 1945 Captain Edmund Wooldridge stepped down as the commanding officer of USS New Jersey.
18 Jan 1946 USS Wisconsin arrived at Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States.
22 Mar 1946 USS Missouri departed the United States with the remains of Turkish Ambassador Mehmet Munir Ertegun.
25 Mar 1946 USS Iowa returned to the United States from Japan.
5 Apr 1946 USS Missouri arrived at Istanbul, Turkey with the remains of Turkish Ambassador Mehmet Munir Ertegun.
10 Apr 1946 USS Missouri arrived at Piraeus, Greece.
26 Apr 1946 USS Missouri departed Piraeus, Greece.
2 Dec 1946 USS Wisconsin arrived at Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States.
13 Dec 1946 A star shell accidentally struck USS Missouri during an exercise in the North Atlantic, causing no damage nor injuries.
30 Aug 1947 USS Missouri arrived at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2 Sep 1947 US President Harry Truman embarked USS Missouri at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
7 Sep 1947 USS Missouri arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States, disembarking US President Harry Truman.
23 Sep 1947 USS Missouri entered New York Naval Shipyard in New York, United States for a scheduled overhaul.
10 Mar 1948 USS Missouri completed her scheduled overhaul at New York Naval Shipyard in New York, United States.
1 Jul 1948 Wisconsin was decommissioned from service.
24 Mar 1949 Iowa was decommissioned from service.
17 Jan 1950 USS Missouri accidentally grounded off Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States.
20 Jan 1950 Kentucky was launched at Norfolk Navy Yard in Virginia, United States.
1 Feb 1950 USS Missouri was refloated; she had accidentally grounded off Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States on 17 Jan 1950.
19 Aug 1950 USS Missouri set sail for Korea.
14 Sep 1950 USS Missouri arrived off Kyushu, Japan and became the flagship of Rear Admiral A. E. Smith.
15 Sep 1950 USS Missouri bombarded communist positions at Samchok, Korea.
10 Oct 1950 USS Missouri became the flagship of Rear Admiral Admiral J. M. Higgins of Cruiser Division 5.
14 Oct 1950 USS Missouri was relieved of the duty of being the flagship of Rear Admiral Admiral J. M. Higgins of Cruiser Division 5.
22 Oct 1950 USS Missouri began bombarding communist positions in the Chongjin-Tanchon area, Korea.
26 Oct 1950 USS Missouri ended bombarding communist positions in the Chongjin-Tanchon area, Korea.
23 Dec 1950 USS Missouri provided gunfire support during the evacuation of US troops at Hungnam, Korea.
3 Mar 1951 USS Wisconsin was recommissioned into service.
19 Mar 1951 USS Missouri departed Korea.
24 Mar 1951 USS Missouri arrived at Yokohama, Japan.
28 Mar 1951 USS Missouri departed Yokohama, Japan.
27 Apr 1951 USS Missouri arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
25 Aug 1951 USS Iowa was recommissioned into service, with Captain William R. Smedberg, III in command.
18 Oct 1951 USS Missouri entered Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States for a scheduled overhaul.
9 Jan 1952 Korean President Syngman Rhee and his wife embarked USS Wisconsin off Busan, Korea.
10 Jan 1952 Korean President Syngman Rhee and his wife disembarked USS Wisconsin off Busan, Korea.
26 Feb 1952 USS Wisconsin hosted Korean Chief of Naval Operations Vice Admiral Shon, US Ambassador J. J. Muccio, and British Royal Navy Rear Admiral Scott-Montcrief off Busan, Korea.
15 Mar 1952 USS Wisconsin was hit by enemy fire off Korea, wounding three men.
30 Mar 1952 USS Missouri completed her scheduled overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States.
1 Apr 1952 USS Iowa became the flagship of Vice Admiral Robert P. Briscoe of the US 7th Fleet.
8 Apr 1952 USS Iowa bombarded communist positions in the Wonsan-Songjin area, Korea.
13 Apr 1952 USS Iowa bombarded communist positions in Korea.
14 Apr 1952 USS Iowa bombarded communist positions at Wonsan, Korea.
19 Apr 1952 USS Wisconsin arrived at Long Beach, California, United States.
20 Apr 1952 USS Iowa bombarded railroad lines at Tanchon, Korea.
25 May 1952 USS Iowa bombarded factories and railroad lines at Chongjin, Korea.
28 May 1952 USS Iowa bombarded communist positions in Wonsan Harbor, Korea.
9 Jun 1952 A helicopter from USS Iowa rescued a downed airman from USS Princeton off Korea.
4 Aug 1952 USS Missouri entered Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States for refitting.
20 Aug 1952 USS Iowa took on 9 wounded sailors from USS Thompson, which was damaged by Chinese artillery off Korea.
11 Sep 1952 USS Missouri departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States.
23 Sep 1952 General Mark Wayne Clark observed the USS Iowa bombardment of Wonsan, Korea from aboard the battleship.
25 Sep 1952 USS Iowa bombarded railroad lines in Korea.
17 Oct 1952 USS Missouri arrived at Yokosuka, Japan and became the flagship of Vice Admiral Joseph J. Clark of the US Navy 7th Fleet.
19 Oct 1952 USS Missouri provided gunfire support in the Tanchon area in Korea.
23 Jan 1953 USS Missouri hosted a meeting between US General Mark Clark and British Admiral Guy Russell.
25 Mar 1953 USS Missouri bombarded Koja, Korea, which was her final gunfire support mission in Korea.
4 May 1953 USS Missouri arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
14 May 1953 USS Missouri became the flagship of Rear Admiral E. T. Woolridge.
25 Aug 1953 USS Wisconsin participated in the NATO exercise Operation Mainbrace off Scotland, United Kingdom.
12 Oct 1953 USS Wisconsin was named the flagship of the Seventh Fleet based in Japan.
1 Apr 1954 USS Wisconsin was relieved as the flagship of the Seventh Fleet based in Japan.
11 Jun 1954 USS Wisconsin began a scheduled overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States.
12 Jul 1954 USS Wisconsin completed her scheduled overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States.
15 Sep 1954 USS Missouri entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for deactivation overhaul.
26 Feb 1955 Missouri was decommissioned from service.
1 Jun 1955 USS Iowa departed on a midshipman training cruise.
6 May 1956 USS Wisconsin collided with destroyer USS Eaton, causing extensive damage to her bow.
4 Jan 1957 USS Iowa departed Norfolk, Virginia, United States for the Mediterranean Sea.
13 Jun 1957 USS Iowa participated in the international naval review at Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States.
3 Sep 1957 USS Iowa departed for Scotland, United Kingdom.
28 Sep 1957 USS Iowa arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
22 Oct 1957 USS Iowa departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States.
24 Feb 1958 USS Iowa was decommissioned from service and was placed in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.
8 Mar 1958 USS Wisconsin was decommissioned from service at Bayonne, New Jersey, United States.
8 Sep 1969 USS New Jersey entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for deactivation overhaul.
17 Dec 1969 USS New Jersey was decommissioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and placed in the Reserve Fleet.
28 Dec 1982 USS New Jersey was recommissioned.
28 Apr 1984 USS Iowa was recommissioned into service after modernization with Captain Gerald E. Gneckow in command.
6 Aug 1984 USS Iowa transited the Panama Canal.
17 Mar 1986 USS Iowa underwent an inspection by the US Navy Board of Inspection and Survey; the board would ultimately find many faults with the battleship and recommended to remove her from service, but the US Navy would decide to allocate funding to address the faults.
10 May 1986 USS Missouri was recommissioned into service at San Francisco, California, United States.
4 Jul 1986 USS Iowa hosted US President Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy Reagan during the international naval review on the Hudson River in New York, United States.
17 Aug 1986 USS Iowa departed for exercises in the North Atlantic.
5 Sep 1986 USS Iowa fired her primary guns on Cape Wrath, Scotland, United Kingdom during an amphibious assault exercise; the firing lasted until the following day.
25 Jul 1987 USS Missouri departed for Persian Gulf.
10 Sep 1987 USS Iowa departed for the Mediterranean Sea.
22 Oct 1987 USS Iowa deprated from the Mediterranean Sea for the North Sea.
25 Nov 1987 USS Iowa transited the Suez Canal.
20 Feb 1988 USS Iowa departed the Persian Gulf.
10 Mar 1988 USS Iowa arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
26 May 1988 Captain Fred Moosally was named the commanding officer of USS Iowa.
25 Aug 1988 USS Iowa held a post-overhaul shakedown cruise in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast of the United States. She was grounded in mud briefly, without causing any damage, during the cruise while maneuvering to avoid collision with other ships.
22 Oct 1988 USS Wisconsin was recommissioned into service with Captain Jerry M. Blesch in command.
20 Jan 1989 USS Iowa set the record for the distance traveled of a 410mm shell (43.3km or 26.9mi) during a gunnery exercise off Vieques, Puerto Rico.
19 Apr 1989 USS Iowa suffered an accidental turret explosion at 0955 hours, killing 47. It was the US Navy's worst loss of life during peace time.
23 Aug 1990 USS Wisconsin arrived at Persian Gulf in the Middle East.
26 Oct 1990 USS Iowa was decommissioned from service.
13 Nov 1990 USS Missouri departed Long Beach, California, United States for the Middle East.
3 Jan 1991 USS Missouri arrived at the Strait of Hormuz off Iran.
15 Jan 1991 USS Wisconsin launched Tomahawk cruise missiles at Iraqi positions.
17 Jan 1991 USS Missouri began firing Tomahawk missles at Iraqi targets over the next five days.
29 Jan 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions near the Iraqi-Saudi border.
3 Feb 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions in Kuwait.
6 Feb 1991 USS Wisconsin bombarded Iraqi positions in southern Kuwait, using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle as a spotter for combat for the first time.
11 Feb 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions in Kuwait.
12 Feb 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions in Kuwait.
23 Feb 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions in Kuwait.
25 Feb 1991 USS Missouri was accidentally damaged by USS Jarrett.
21 Mar 1991 USS Missouri departed Persian Gulf.
28 Mar 1991 USS Wisconsin returned to the United States.
9 Sep 1991 New Jersey was decommissioned from service.
30 Sep 1991 USS Wisconsin was decommissioned from service.
7 Dec 1991 USS Missouri hosted US President George Bush for a remembrance ceremony on the anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack.
31 Mar 1992 USS Missouri was decommissioned at Long Beach, California, United States.
12 Jan 1995 Battleship Missouri was struck from the US Naval Register.
15 Oct 1996 Battleship Wisconsin arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
4 May 1998 Battleship Missouri was transferred to the USS Missouri Memorial Association.
22 Jun 1998 Battleship Missouri arrived at Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, United States under tow.
24 Sep 1998 Battleship Iowa arrived at Newport, Virginia, United States.
29 Jan 1999 Museum ship Missouri was opened to visitors.
7 Dec 2000 Battleship Wisconsin arrived at Portsmouth, Virginia, United States under tow.
8 Mar 2001 Battleship Iowa departed Newport, Virginia, United States under tow.
16 Apr 2001 Battleship Wisconsin hosted tourists for the first time at Hampton Roads Naval Museum in Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
21 Apr 2001 Battleship Iowa arrived at Suisun Bay, California, United States under tow.
17 Mar 2006 Battleship Iowa was struck from the US Naval Registry.
17 Mar 2006 Already a museum ship at Norfolk, Virginia, United States, battleship Wisconsin was removed from the US Navy reserve fleet roster.
25 Apr 2009 The senate of Iowa, United States passed a resolution to support battleship Iowa remaining at Mare Island, California, United States as a museum ship.
13 May 2010 US Navy reopened the bidding process for the conversion and maintenance of battleship Iowa as a museum ship.
24 May 2010 The US Federal Register reopened the bidding process for the conversion and maintenance of battleship Iowa as a museum ship.
26 May 2010 The US Navy received the Pacific Battleship Center's Letter of Intent to submit an application for maintaing battleship Iowa as a museum ship.
24 Sep 2010 The city council of Los Angeles, California, United States passed a resolution to support Pacific Battleship Center's proposal to bring battleship Iowa to Los Angeles.
7 Oct 2010 The Board of Harbor Commissioners of Los Angeles, California, United States tentatively welcomed battleship Iowa as a museum ship in Los Angeles.
4 Nov 2010 Pier 87 in the Port of Los Angeles, California, United States was named as a recommended location for battleship Iowa as a museum ship.
18 Nov 2010 The commissioners of Port of Los Angeles, California, United States approved Berth 87 as the future home of battleship Iowa.
21 Nov 2010 The Pacific Battleship Center submitted the initial application to the US Navy to acquire battleship Iowa.
31 May 2011 The Pacific Battleship Center submitted the final application to the US Navy to acquire battleship Iowa.
6 Sep 2011 The US Navy awarded battleship Iowa to the Pacific Battleship Center for placement at the Port of Los Angeles, California, United States as a museum ship.
28 Oct 2011 Battleship Iowa arrived at Port of Richmond, California, United States under tow.
10 Dec 2011 Battleship Iowa was opened to tourists as a museum ship at Port of Richmond, California, United States.

Photographs

Aerial view of USS Iowa underway, 10 Jun 1944USS Iowa with newly-equipped SC-1 Seahawk aircraft, 5 Mar 1945USS Iowa firing a full broadside during a gunnery demonstration, 15 Aug 1984Guided missile frigate USS Halyburton receiving fuel from battleship USS Iowa in the North Atlantic, 6 Sep 1985, photo 2 of 5
See all 445 photographs of Iowa-class Battleship

Videos

Newsreel of Japanese signing formal instruments of surrender aboard USS Missouri




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Ships of this Class:
» Illinois
» Iowa
» Kentucky
» Missouri
» New Jersey
» Wisconsin

Iowa-class Battleship Photo Gallery
Aerial view of USS Iowa underway, 10 Jun 1944
See all 445 photographs of Iowa-class Battleship


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