USS St. Louis file photo [3845]

St. Louis

CountryUnited States
Ship ClassSt. Louis-class Light Cruiser
Hull NumberCL-49
BuilderNewport News Shipbuilding
Laid Down10 Dec 1936
Launched15 Apr 1938
Commissioned19 May 1939
Decommissioned20 Jun 1946
Sunk24 Aug 1980
Displacement10,000 tons standard
Length608 feet
Beam62 feet
Draft20 feet
Machinery8 Boilers, 4 Geared Turbines, 4 Screws
Power Output100,000 shaft horsepower
Speed33 knots
Crew888
ArmamentAs built: 5x3x6in/47, 4x2x5in/38, 4x4x40mm, 6x2x40mm, 16x1.1in, 9x20mm
Aircraft4
Sold to Brazil29 Jan 1951
Decommissioned by Brazil28 Jun 1976

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe St. Louis was laid down as a modified Brooklyn-class cruiser on 10 Dec 1936 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia, United States. Built according to the terms of the London Naval Treaty of 1930, St. Louis was lightly armored with displacement not to exceed 10,000 tons. St. Louis principally differed from previous Brooklyn-class cruisers by having slightly modified deck structures, increased 5-inch/38 guns, and rearranged engine/boiler rooms. The ship was launched on 15 Apr 1938, sponsored by Miss Nancy Lee Morrill of St. Louis, Missouri. USS St. Louis was commissioned at Norfolk, Virginia on 19 May 1939 with Captain Charles Morrison in command.

ww2dbaseAfter shakedown, St. Louis served in the Atlantic Neutrality Patrols for a year. Beginning on 3 Sep 1940, she hosted an inspection party touring British naval bases from Newfoundland to British Guiana as part of the recent Destroyers for Bases agreement between Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. Soon thereafter, St. Louis sailed for the Pacific. She took part in fleet exercises and conducted patrols through the central Pacific reaching as far as Manila in the Philippines. On 27 May 1941 while at Mare Island Naval Shipyard in California, Captain George Rood relieved Captain Morrison as commanding officer. In late Sep 1941, St. Louis entered the Navy Yard at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for general upkeep.

ww2dbaseOn 7 Dec 1941, USS St. Louis was moored alongside USS Honolulu at the Pearl Harbor repair piers when the Japanese attacked. St. Louis was among the few capital ships to get underway during the attack and was the first to reach the open ocean. As St. Louis was exiting the harbor channel, she reported sighting a Japanese midget submarine firing two torpedoes directly toward the cruiser, but the torpedoes exploded against a reef before reaching the ship. St. Louis fired on the submarine and immediately made evasive turns once clear of the channel.

ww2dbaseHistorical Fact-Check

ww2dbaseAboard St. Louis, Captain Rood was steadfast in his belief that his ship had exchanged fire with a submarine and he offered many supporting details, but it is more likely this was something less sinister. During St. Louis's sortie from Pearl Harbor, the channel entrance was being swept by minesweepers Condor, Crossbill, and Cockatoo. Condor's deck log is very candid in saying that as St. Louis left the channel, she fired at Crossbill's minesweeping gear to St. Louis's right while St. Louis made a sudden turn to her left and cut through Condor's sweeping gear. The existence of the submarine reported by Captain Rood and, in particular, the firing of the submarine's torpedoes are still matters under considerable historical debate. But under the totality of available evidence, this author finds Condor's account quite credible and, respectfully, finds Captain Rood's account unlikely.

ww2dbaseOnce clear of Pearl Harbor's entrance channel, Captain Rood took command of the few ships outside the harbor and made his best effort to locate and engage the Japanese fleet, which he knew had to have been a greatly superior force. He had no success finding the Japanese, however, because the best intelligence available said the Japanese were south of Oahu when, in fact, they were north.

ww2dbaseSt. Louis returned to Pearl Harbor on 10 Dec 1941. She then made two trips to San Francisco, California escorting convoys of casualties from the Pearl Harbor Attack and families of Army and Navy personnel returning to the United States. On 6 Jan 1942, St. Louis departed San Francisco with a task force escorting a Marine Expeditionary Force to Samoa. After delivering that force, St. Louis screened that same task force as carrier planes and heavy cruisers launched the United States' first offensive strike of the war on 1 Feb 1942 against targets in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands. St. Louis then resumed Hawaii-to-California convoy duty before screening one convoy to Bora Bora in the Society Islands. There, St. Louis relieved USS Richmond as escort for passenger liner SS President Coolidge transiting from Australia to the United States with Philippine president Manuel Quezon on board. The last escort duty for St. Louis in this period was in May 1942 with a convoy carrying Marines from Hawaii to Midway ahead of an anticipated attack there.

ww2dbaseSt. Louis then shifted to the Aleutian Islands where she joined a task force of cruisers and destroyers patrolling the Gulf of Alaska. On 8 Aug 1942, St. Louis conducted her first shore bombardment of the war when she and other warships shelled Japanese positions on Kiska Island. At the end of that month, St. Louis covered the US Army landings on Adak Island.

ww2dbaseIn Oct 1942, St. Louis was detached from the Alaskan patrols and headed for Mare Island Naval Shipyard in California for an overhaul. While at Mare Island, Captain Rood was relieved and Captain Colin Campbell assumed command.

ww2dbaseBack on convoy duty briefly, St. Louis escorted transports bound for Nouméa, New Caledonia before shifting to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides and finally the Solomon Islands. In the Solomons, St. Louis joined a cruiser-destroyer force tasked with interdicting the near nightly "Tokyo Express" runs down "The Slot" with replenishments and reinforcements. St. Louis made nighttime bombardments at Munda, Vila, and Bairoko Harbor in the New Georgia group. On 6 Jul 1942, St. Louis was part of the fierce Battle of Kula Gulf where sister-ship USS Helena fought bravely but was sunk by three Japanese Type 97 "Long Lance" torpedoes. One week later, it was St. Louis's turn when one torpedo struck St. Louis in the bow during the Battle of Kolombangara. A large portion of St. Louis's lower bow was missing and her forward decks were buckled, but the ship remained afloat with few serious casualties. St. Louis made her way back to Tulagi and then to Espiritu Santo and then to Mare Island in California. At Mare Island, Captain Ralph Roberts relieved Captain Campbell as commanding officer.

ww2dbaseBy Nov 1943, St. Louis was back in the Solomon Islands. At the end of the month, St. Louis was part of the covering force for the Marines advancing on Bougainville, a duty St. Louis performed through Jan 1944. On 13 Feb 1944, St. Louis along with USS Honolulu departed Tulagi in the Solomon Islands to support landings on the Green Islands in the Bismarck Archipelago. The following day while the ships were still in transit, they came under aerial attack with one bomb plunging through St. Louis's deck and exploding inside a berthing compartment. Twenty-three men were killed and St. Louis was forced to withdraw to Tulagi for repairs.

ww2dbaseWithin a month, St. Louis rejoined her task group and in Jun 1944 she shifted to Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands. There, St. Louis joined a formation of ships amassing for the invasion of the Mariana Islands. Beginning 14 Jun 1944, St. Louis spent ten days on station between Saipan and Tinian offering shore bombardments and anti-aircraft cover as required. On 28 Jun 1944, St. Louis entered Eniwetok Lagoon for two weeks of replenishment and upkeep.

ww2dbaseAlongside USS Honolulu, with whom St. Louis fought much of World War II shoulder-to-shoulder since Pearl Harbor, St. Louis departed Eniwetok bound for the Mariana Islands once again. The following day while still underway, St. Louis experience a racing No. 3 engine. This suggested a broken propeller shaft or possibly a lost propeller. St. Louis was able to proceed on her three remaining propellers and she continued on. Upon arrival at Guam while laying off shore covering underwater demolition teams on the beach, St. Louis sent a diver over the side to inspect her propellers. The diver found the entire No. 3 propeller was missing along with 39 feet of the shaft. The shaft was broken at a place very near the area of greatest damage from the bombing attack on 14 Feb 1944. St. Louis remained on station for two more weeks covering the landings of the 3rd Marines on Guam's Asan Beach.

ww2dbaseOn 30 Jul 1944, St. Louis departed the Mariana Islands and returned to the United States for repairs and overhaul. She entered the Navy drydocks at San Pedro, California and emerged two months later. St. Louis arrived at the Ulithi fleet anchorage, Caroline Islands on 8 Nov 1944, just a week after the decisive Battle of Leyte Gulf.

ww2dbaseNow part of a battleship group, St. Louis began patrols within Leyte Gulf covering the gulf's approaches lest the Japanese attempt another incursion as they had a few weeks before. The Battle of Leyte Gulf also marked the introduction of the Japanese Tokko special attack doctrine. On 27 Nov 1944, the battleship group withstood a withering aerial special attack involving up to 30 aircraft. St. Louis alone was dived upon by at least eight aircraft bent on crashing into the ship. One aircraft struck the vessel very near her aircraft hangar. Another crashed into the water close beside the ship with an explosion that still had significant consequences.

ww2dbaseFifteen men were dead, one was missing, and 43 were wounded. St. Louis had a 20-foot hole in her deck, no serviceable aircraft, ventilation systems were damaged so badly that one engine room was untenable, three of her primary guns and one secondary gun were unserviceable, a 20-foot section of armor plating below the waterline was missing and another section was loose, hull plating was deformed, six compartments had holes open to the sea, and hull plates were separated from the framework in one location at least. Less than three weeks after returning to the fleet, St. Louis was going back to drydock.

ww2dbaseOn 29 Nov 1944 USS St. Louis and USS Colorado, also damaged in the same attack, departed Leyte Gulf bound for Seeadler Harbor at Manus in the Admiralty Islands. While transiting to Manus, St. Louis struck an unknown underwater object that damaged her No. 2 propeller. St. Louis entered a floating drydock at Manus for partial repairs before continuing on to the drydocks at San Pedro, California.

ww2dbaseWhile at San Pedro on 13 Jan 1945, Captain John Griggs relieved Captain Roberts as St. Louis's commanding officer. With repairs complete, St. Louis was floated out of drydock on 6 Feb 1945 and, after a shakedown period, she departed on 23 Feb 1945 to rejoin the fleet.

ww2dbaseOn arrival at Ulithi, St. Louis joined the Fast Carrier Task Force bound for a series of strikes against Japan. St. Louis took part in the pre-invasion shelling of Okinawa and remained in the area for a month covering the landings. She shelled shore positions on Okinawa at the request of the land forces and covered replenishment activities. On 15 Aug 1945, St. Louis was at anchor in Buckner Bay, Okinawa when the war ended.

ww2dbaseUpon Japan's surrender, preparations began immediately for accepting the formal surrender, disarming Japanese forces, and repatriating prisoners of war. St. Louis supported the search for prisoner of war camps near Shanghai, China. By Oct 1945, St. Louis was assigned to facilitate the transfer of the Chinese 70th Army from China to Kiirun, Formosa (now Keelung, Taiwan) for the formal Japanese surrender on Taiwan scheduled for later that month. St. Louis was then assigned to Operation Magic Carpet aimed at returning US servicemen to the United States. St. Louis made two trips across the Pacific bringing home as many servicemen as the cruiser could accommodate. Her last Magic Carpet voyage ended on 14 Dec 1945 at San Pedro, California. St. Louis then shifted to the Atlantic and entered the Philadelphia Navy Yard for her decommissioning overhaul. In the ship's final weeks, Commander Andrew Smith relieved Captain John Griggs as commanding officer. USS St. Louis was decommissioned on 20 Jun 1946 and placed in the Philadelphia Reserve Fleet where she remained for over four years.

ww2dbaseOn 22 Jan 1951, St. Louis was stricken from the US Navy list in preparation for the ship's transfer to Brazil. She was recommissioned into the Brazilian Navy on 29 Jan 1951 as the Tamandaré where she served for another 25 years. The ex-St. Louis was decommissioned for the final time on 28 Jun 1976 and sold for scrap on 5 Aug 1980. On 24 Aug 1980 while being towed to a breaking yard in Taiwan, the ship foundered and sank off South Africa.

ww2dbaseUSS St. Louis was strafed at Pearl Harbor, torpedoed in the Solomons, bombed in the Bismarcks, struck by an airplane in the Philippines, and fought at Okinawa; but she survived and served throughout World War II, earning eleven battle stars.

ww2dbaseSources:
United States Navy
NavSource Naval History
USS St. Louis Veterans Association
Military Times - Hall of Valor
Ships of the U.S. Navy in WWII "Dazzle" Camouflage
USN Camouflage 1941-1945
Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Jul 2023

Light Cruiser St. Louis (CL-49) Interactive Map

Photographs

Schematic drawing of the St. Louis sub-class of the United States Brooklyn-class light cruiser, of which there were two.Cruiser St. Louis sliding down the ways at Newport News Shipbuilding 15 Apr 1938 at Newport News, Virginia, United States.Cruiser St. Louis on acceptance trials off Rockland, Maine, United States, 28 Apr 1939.Cruiser St. Louis moored at Pier 7 at the Naval Operating Base in Norfolk, Virginia, United States 19 May 1939 prior to her commissioning ceremony.
See all 35 photographs of Light Cruiser St. Louis (CL-49)

Maps

Track chart from the shelling of Kiska Island by the cruiser USS St. Louis, 7 Aug 1942.Sketch excerpted from USS St. Louis’s action report showing paths of nine special attack planes that dived on the ship in Leyte Gulf, Philippines, 27 Nov 1944.

St. Louis Operational Timeline

10 Dec 1936 The keel for the new Brooklyn-class cruiser St. Louis was laid at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia.
15 Apr 1938 Cruiser St. Louis was launched at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia.
19 May 1939 Cruiser USS St. Louis was commissioned at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia with Captain Charles Morrison in command.
3 Sep 1940 Light cruiser USS St. Louis departed Norfolk, Virginia with Rear Admiral John F. Greenslade on board, who was placed in charge to survey land recently gained from the United Kingdom for building military bases.
27 Oct 1940 USS St. Louis arrived at Norfolk, Virginia.
9 Nov 1940 USS St. Louis departed Norfolk, Virginia bound for the Pacific via Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and the Panama Canal.
14 Nov 1940 USS St. Louis transited the Panama Canal.
12 Dec 1940 USS St. Louis arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
27 May 1941 While at Mare Island Naval Shipyard in California, Captain George A. Rood relieved Captain Charles Morrison as commanding officer of cruiser USS St. Louis.
20 Jun 1941 USS St. Louis arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii after an overhaul at Mare Island, California.
28 Sep 1941 After a cruise through the central Pacific ending in Manila, Philippines, USS St. Louis entered the Navy Yard at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for general upkeep.
7 Dec 1941 USS St. Louis was among the first capital ships to depart Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from the inner harbor following the Japanese aerial attack. Upon arrival at the harbor entrance, St. Louis reported immediately taking a Japanese midget submarine under fire with uncertain results.
10 Dec 1941 After three days of patrolling around the Hawaiian island of Oahu, USS St. Louis arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
11 Dec 1941 Cruisers USS Phoenix and USS St. Louis departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii bound for San Francisco, California, United States.
16 Dec 1941 Cruisers USS Phoenix and USS St. Louis departed arrived at San Francisco, California, United States. Phoenix entered Mare Island Naval Shipyard. St. Louis departed the same day escorting a convoy to Honolulu, Hawaii.
21 Dec 1941 USS St. Louis arrived at Honolulu, Hawaii with her convoy. The convoy ships entered Honolulu Harbor and St. Louis entered Pearl Harbor.
26 Dec 1941 USS St. Louis departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii as a convoy escort bound for San Francisco, California. The convoy consisted of Matson liners SS Lurline, SS Matsonia, and SS Monterey transporting wounded personnel from the Pearl Harbor Attack and military families returning to the United States after the onset of war.
31 Dec 1941 USS St. Louis and convoy arrived at San Francisco, California.
2 Jan 1942 USS St. Louis departed San Francisco as a convoy escort bound for San Diego, California.
3 Jan 1942 USS St. Louis and convoy arrived at San Diego, California.
6 Jan 1942 USS Yorktown, Louisville, and St. Louis departed San Diego, California, United States to escort transports carrying the US 2nd Marine Brigade to American Samoa.
14 Jan 1942 USS Yorktown, Louisville, and St. Louis and convoy crossed the equator while transiting from San Diego, California to Pago Pago, Samoa.
20 Jan 1942 USS Yorktown, Louisville, and St. Louis and convoy arrived at Pago Pago, Samoa.
24 Jan 1942 USS Yorktown, Louisville, and St. Louis departed Pago Pago, Samoa bound for the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
30 Jan 1942 USS Yorktown, Louisville, and St. Louis and task group crossed the 180th meridian while transiting from Pago Pago, Samoa to the Gilbert Islands.
1 Feb 1942 The United States launched its first air offensive against the Marshall Islands as SBD and TBD aircraft from carriers USS Yorktown and USS Enterprise struck Japanese bases in the island group. Cruisers USS Northampton, USS Chester, and USS Salt Lake City also bombarded atolls in the Marshall Islands, sinking gunboat Toyotsu Maru and transport Bordeaux Maru and damaging cruiser Katori, submarine I-23, submarine depot ship Yasukuni Maru, minelayer Tokiwa, and several others. Vice Admiral Mitsumi Shimizu was wounded aboard Katori. USS Chester sustained damage from a Japanese dive bomber during the attack; 8 were killed, 21 were wounded.
6 Feb 1942 Task Force 17 under the command of Rear Admiral Jack Fletcher and consisting of USS Yorktown, USS Louisville, and USS St. Louis arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
16 Feb 1942 USS St. Louis departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii bound for San Francisco, California.
23 Feb 1942 USS St. Louis arrived at San Francisco, California and entered Mare Island Naval Shipyard.
24 Feb 1942 USS St. Louis entered drydock #2 at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard
1 Mar 1942 USS St. Louis was floated out of drydock #2 at Mare Island Naval Shipyard.
6 Mar 1942 USS St. Louis shifted from Mare Island to San Francisco, California.
10 Mar 1942 USS St. Louis departed San Francisco as an escort for a convoy of US Army men and equipment bound for Hawaii.
15 Mar 1942 USS St. Louis and convoy arrive in Hawaii with half of the convoy entering Hilo Harbor, half entering Honolulu Harbor, and St. Louis entering Pearl Harbor.
19 Mar 1942 USS St. Louis departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii as an escort for a convoy bound for San Francisco, California.
24 Mar 1942 USS St. Louis and convoy arrived at San Francisco, California.
1 Apr 1942 USS St. Louis shifted from San Francisco to Mare Island, Vallejo, California.
9 Apr 1942 USS St. Louis shifted from Mare Island to San Francisco, California.
12 Apr 1942 USS St. Louis departed San Francisco as an escort for a convoy bound for Bora Bora, Society Islands.
23 Apr 1942 While at sea, the convoy escorted by USS St. Louis from San Francisco met with the convoy escorted by USS Honolulu from San Diego and they continued on together bound for Bora Bora.
26 Apr 1942 USS St. Louis and convoy arrived at Bora Bora, Society Islands.
29 Apr 1942 USS St. Louis departed Bora Bora bound for San Francisco, California escorting transport SS President Coolidge carrying President Manuel Quezon of the Philippines from Australia to the United States.
8 May 1942 USS St. Louis arrived at San Francisco, California.
9 May 1942 USS St. Louis departed San Francisco as an escort for a convoy bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
10 May 1942 A convoy from San Francisco escorted by USS St. Louis met with a convoy from San Diego that included USS Kitty Hawk. The two convoys joined and continued on toward Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
17 May 1942 USS St. Louis, USS Kitty Hawk, and convoy arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
23 May 1942 USS St. Louis departed Pearl Harbor bound for Midway with two companies of the 2nd Raider Battalion, United States Marine Corps. Two hours later, USS Kitty Hawk departed Pearl Harbor also bound for Midway.
25 May 1942 Companies C and D of the 2nd Raider Battalion and the 37mm battery of the 3rd Defense Battalion of the United States Marine Corps arrived at Midway via USS St. Louis. St. Louis departed the same day bound for Cold Bay, Alaska.
31 May 1942 USS St. Louis arrived at Kodiak, Alaska after having been redirected from Cold Bay, Alaska. St. Louis departed later the same day for an Alaskan patrol.
2 Jun 1942 USS St. Louis joined with USS Nashville at sea and, as Task Force 8, continued together on their Alaskan patrol.
3 Jun 1942 USS St. Louis and USS Nashville joined with USS Indianapolis, USS Louisville, and USS Honolulu to round out Task Force 8 on patrol in the Gulf of Alaska. Upon hearing reports from Dutch Harbor, Alaska of an air attack by carrier planes, Task Force 8 immediately began searching for Japanese carriers operating south of the Aleutian Islands.
2 Jul 1942 USS St. Louis arrived at Kodiak, Alaska.
5 Jul 1942 USS St. Louis departed Kodiak, Alaska to resume Alaskan patrols.
31 Jul 1942 Task Force 8 consisting of USS Indianapolis, USS Nashville, USS Louisville, USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and escorts arrived at Kodiak, Alaska.
3 Aug 1942 Task Force 8 consisting of USS Indianapolis, USS Nashville, USS Louisville, USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and escorts departed Kodiak, Alaska and resumed Alaskan patrol.
7 Aug 1942 Task Force 8 consisting of USS Indianapolis, USS Nashville, USS Louisville, USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and escorts bombard Japanese positions on Kiska Island near the western end of Alaska's Aleutian chain.
11 Aug 1942 Task Force 8 consisting of USS Indianapolis, USS Nashville, USS Louisville, USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and escorts arrived at Kodiak, Alaska.
19 Aug 1942 USS Louisville and USS St. Louis departed Kodiak, Alaska on an Alaskan patrol.
24 Aug 1942 USS Louisville and USS St. Louis arrived at Kodiak, Alaska.
26 Aug 1942 USS Nashville and USS St. Louis departed Kodiak, Alaska as escorts for the US Army troops bound for Adak Island.
30 Aug 1942 USS Nashville, USS Honolulu, and USS St. Louis covered US Army's unopposed landing at Adak Island in Alaska's Aleutian chain.
8 Sep 1942 USS St. Louis departed the area of Adak Island bound for Kodiak, Alaska.
11 Sep 1942 USS St. Louis arrived at Kodiak, Alaska,
13 Sep 1942 USS St. Louis departed Kodiak, Alaska bound for Adak Island.
16 Sep 1942 USS St. Louis arrived at Adak Island and departed the same day in company with USS Honolulu to rendezvous with a tanker bound for Adak.
19 Sep 1942 USS St. Louis joined with USS Indianapolis, USS Louisville, and USS Nashville and continued on with Alaskan patrol.
4 Oct 1942 USS Nashville and USS Bailey joined with USS Indianapolis, USS St. Louis, USS Case, and USS Bancroft 125 miles northeast of Adak Island.
16 Oct 1942 USS Nashville, USS St. Louis, USS Bailey, USS Long, and USS Bancroft sailed around the western end of the Japanese-held Attu Island at the western end of the Aleutian Island chain and shifted from their patrol area north of the Aleutians to a patrol area south of the Aleutians.
25 Oct 1942 USS St. Louis was detached from Task Force 8 and directed to sail to Mare Island Naval Shipyard in California by way of Dutch Harbor, Alaska.
26 Oct 1942 USS St. Louis arrived at Dutch Harbor, Alaska and departed almost immediately due to increasing gale, setting a course for Mare Island Naval Shipyard in California.
31 Oct 1942 USS St. Louis arrived at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California for a period of overhaul.
3 Nov 1942 Captain Colin Campbell relieved Captain George Rood as commanding officer of cruiser USS St. Louis at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California.
29 Nov 1942 USS St. Louis shifted from Mare Island to San Francisco, California.
3 Dec 1942 USS St. Louis departed San Francisco, California escorting a convoy bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
11 Dec 1942 USS St. Louis crossed the equator at 153 57W longitude.
17 Dec 1942 USS St. Louis crossed the 180th Meridian at 20 18S latitude.
21 Dec 1942 USS St. Louis and convoy arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
27 Dec 1942 Escort carriers USS Nassau and USS Altamaha escorted by cruisers USS St. Louis and HMS Achilles with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS McCalla, USS McCall, and USS Craven departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
30 Dec 1942 Escort carriers USS Nassau and USS Altamaha escorted by cruisers USS St. Louis and HMS Achilles with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS McCalla, USS McCall, and USS Craven arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
2 Jan 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville, USS St. Louis, USS Helena, USS Honolulu, HMNZS Achilles, USS Columbia, and USS Louisville escorted by destroyers USS Fletcher, USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Lamson, and USS Drayton departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides on a patrol south of Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
5 Jan 1943 In the early morning darkness, cruisers USS Nashville, USS St. Louis, and USS Helena (St. Louis-class) with destroyers USS Fletcher and USS O'Bannon conducted a nighttime bombardment of the Japanese-held airstrip at Munda on New Georgia, Solomon Islands.
8 Jan 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville, USS St. Louis, USS Helena, USS Honolulu, HMNZS Achilles, USS Columbia, and USS Louisville escorted by destroyers USS Fletcher, USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Lamson, and USS Drayton returned to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
22 Jan 1943 Task Force 67 consisting of cruisers USS Nashville, USS Helena, USS Honolulu, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS DeHaven, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Drayton, USS Lamson, and USS Hughes departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands as a striking force.
24 Jan 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Drayton, USS Lamson, and USS Hughes arrived at Purvis Bay, Tulagi, Solomon Islands, refueled, and departed for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
25 Jan 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville, USS Helena (St. Louis-class), Honolulu and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Drayton, USS Lamson, and USS Hughes arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
28 Jan 1943 Task Force 67 consisting of cruisers USS Nashville, USS Helena (St. Louis-class), USS Honolulu, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Drayton, USS Lamson, USS O’Bannon, and USS Reid departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides for patrols in the lanes southwest of the Santa Cruz Islands.
1 Feb 1943 USS St. Louis and USS Honolulu arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, refueled, and put to sea again to continue patrols.
14 Feb 1943 Task Force 67 consisting of cruisers USS Nashville, USS Helena (St. Louis-class), USS Honolulu, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Drayton, USS Lamson, USS O’Bannon, and USS Reid arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
15 Feb 1943 Task Force 67 consisting of cruisers USS Nashville, USS Helena (St. Louis-class), USS Honolulu, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Chevalier, USS Strong, USS Taylor, and USS Jenkins departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides for patrols in the lanes south of San Cristobal Island, Solomon Islands.
23 Feb 1943 Task Force 67 consisting of cruisers USS Nashville, USS Helena (St. Louis-class), USS Honolulu, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Chevalier, USS Strong, USS Taylor, and USS Jenkins arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
3 Mar 1943 Task Force 67 cruisers USS Nashville, USS Honolulu, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Russell, USS Strong, USS Morris, USS Chevalier, and USS Jenkins departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides for patrols in the lanes north of Espiritu Santo.
12 Mar 1943 Task Force 67 cruisers USS Nashville, USS Honolulu, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Taylor, USS Strong, USS Chevalier, and USS Jenkins arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides. After refueling, the task force departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides to patrol the lanes north of Espiritu Santo.
21 Mar 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville and USS St. Louis arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
29 Mar 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Strong departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for several days of night patrols of the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) from Tulagi up to Kula Gulf.
6 Apr 1943 USS Helena (St. Louis-class) joined the cruiser group with USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, and USS St. Louis while the cruiser group was on station in the Solomon Islands.
7 Apr 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, USS Helena, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, USS Strong, USS Fletcher, and USS Chevalier departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
10 Apr 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, USS Helena, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, USS Strong, USS Fletcher, and USS Chevalier arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
5 May 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and USS Nashville with destroyers USS O'Bannon, USS Taylor, USS Strong, and USS Chevalier departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for the Blackett Strait, Solomon Islands by way of the New Georgia Sound (The "Slot").
7 May 1943 Shortly after midnight, cruisers USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and USS Nashville with destroyers USS O'Bannon, USS Taylor, USS Strong, and USS Chevalier made one circuit through Vella Gulf in the Solomon Islands covering minelayers laying mines in Blackett Strait.
8 May 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and USS Nashville with destroyers USS O'Bannon, USS Taylor, USS Strong, and USS Chevalier arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
11 May 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, USS Helena, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, USS Strong, USS Fletcher, and USS Chevalier departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Kolombangara, Solomon Islands.
12 May 1943 Cruiser USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Fletcher and USS Jenkins detached from the task force and proceeded on their prong of the attack plan set for the following day.
13 May 1943 Shortly after midnight, cruiser USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Fletcher and USS Jenkins formed a bombardment line offshore of the Japanese airstrip at Munda, New Georgia, Solomon Islands and shelled the airstrip.
14 May 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, USS St. Louis, and USS Helena, with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Taylor, USS Strong, and USS Chevalier departed the Solomon Islands and arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides. On arrival, Nicholas and Chevalier went alongside the tender USS Dixie for repairs to their guns.
28 Jun 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Helena, USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Strong, USS McCall, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for the Coral Sea.
3 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Helena, USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Strong, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
4 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Helena, USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Strong, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands on patrol of the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) toward Kula Gulf.
5 Jul 1943 The US Northern Landing Group under Colonel Harry Liversedge landed at Rice Anchorage on the northern coast of New Georgia, Solomon Islands. On the same day shortly after midnight, US cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Helena, and USS St. Louis escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Strong, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon entered Kula Gulf to shell Japanese positions on Kolombangara and New Georgia in support of the landings at Rice Anchorage. At the same time, Japanese destroyers Niizuki, Nagatsuki, Yunagi, and Satsuki arrived at the north end of Kula Gulf loaded with 1,300 reinforcement troops and 180 tons of provisions bound for Vila, Kolombangara at the south end of Kula Gulf. Upon the commencement of the American shelling at Bairoka Harbor, New Georgia, the Japanese commander, Commander Kunizo Kanaoka, aborted the mission and ordered a withdrawal. As they turned, Niizuki, Nagatsuki, and Yunagi launched a spread of 14 Type 93 “Long Lance” torpedoes into the gulf. At a range of 22,000 yards (11 nautical miles), one of the torpedoes struck and sank destroyer USS Strong. This is believed to be the longest successful torpedo attack of the war. The Americans never detected the presence of the Japanese destroyers and believed Strong was torpedoed by a submarine.
7 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Chevalier departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
8 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Chevalier arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
10 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Chevalier departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for the Solomon Islands.
12 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and HMNZS Leander escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Chevalier joined with destroyers USS Gwin, USS Woodworth, USS Buchanan, and USS Maury. Together, these ships sailed up the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) toward Kolombangara. Yugure, Yukikaze, Hamakaze, and Kiyonami departed Shortland Islands, Solomon Islands, escorting a troop transport mission involving light cruiser Jintsu to Kolombangara, New Georgia Group, Solomon Islands. The two forces engaged in the Battle of Kolombangara that lasted into the next morning.
13 Jul 1943 Shortly after midnight, cruisers USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and HMNZS Leander escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, USS Chevalier, USS Gwin, USS Woodworth, USS Buchanan, and USS Maury engaged Japanese cruiser Jintsu and destroyers Yukikaze, Hamakaze, Yugure, Mikazuki, and Kiyonami in New Georgia Sound north of Kolombangara. Japanese Type 93 torpedoes damaged Honolulu, St. Louis, and Leander. Destroyers Woodworth and Buchanan were damaged in a collision. Jintsu was sunk by cruiser gunfire and a torpedo. Destroyer Yukikaze was damaged. Destroyer USS Ralph Talbot went to the aid of USS Gwin, badly damaged by a torpedo, and took aboard 155 officers and men. USS Maury took another 53 officers and men. Ralph Talbot then scuttled Gwin with torpedoes. The Japanese were able to land 1,200 men nevertheless.
13 Jul 1943 During the Battle of Kolombangara, cruiser USS St. Louis was struck by a Japanese torpedo in the port bow, causing moderate damage. Down by the head, St. Louis withdrew to Tulagi Harbor, Solomon Islands.
16 Jul 1943 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides. St. Louis moored alongside repair ship USS Vestal.
1 Aug 1943 USS St. Louis departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Mare Island Naval Shipyard in California, United States.
17 Aug 1943 USS St. Louis arrived at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California, United States.
20 Aug 1943 USS St. Louis entered drydock #3 at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard
6 Oct 1943 USS St. Louis was floated out of drydock #3 at Mare Island Naval Shipyard.
12 Oct 1943 At Mare Island, California, Captain Ralph Roberts relieved Captain Colin Campbell as commanding officer of cruiser USS St. Louis.
16 Oct 1943 USS St. Louis shifted from Mare Island to San Francisco, California.
17 Oct 1943 USS St. Louis put to sea for full power trials before returning to San Francisco Bay, California.
19 Oct 1943 USS St. Louis departed San Francisco bound for San Diego, California.
20 Oct 1943 USS St. Louis arrived at San Diego, California.
21 Oct 1943 USS St. Louis departed San Diego bound for Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California.
22 Oct 1943 USS St. Louis arrived at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California, United States.
29 Oct 1943 USS St. Louis departed Mare Island, conducted sea trials off the Golden Gate, and returned to San Francisco, California.
30 Oct 1943 USS St. Louis departed San Francisco, California bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
9 Nov 1943 USS St. Louis stopped briefly at Pago Pago, Samoa before pressing on toward Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
13 Nov 1943 USS St. Louis arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
14 Nov 1943 At Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, Rear Admiral Walden Ainsworth shifted his flag from USS St. Louis to USS Nashville.
15 Nov 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville and USS St. Louis departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
16 Nov 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville and USS St. Louis arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
18 Nov 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville and USS St. Louis departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands as escorts for a reinforcement convoy bound for the landing beaches at Torokina, Bougainville.
20 Nov 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville and USS St. Louis returned to Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
21 Nov 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville and USS St. Louis departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands for a patrol through the Solomon Sea in support of the landings at Cape Torokina, Bougainville.
25 Nov 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville and USS St. Louis returned to Tulagi, Solomon Islands. Rear Admiral Walden Ainsworth shifted his flag from USS Nashville to USS St. Louis.
13 Dec 1943 USS St. Louis departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
14 Dec 1943 USS St. Louis arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides. Rear Admiral Walden Ainsworth shifted his flag from USS St. Louis to USS Honolulu.
21 Dec 1943 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides for gunnery exercises.
23 Dec 1943 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis returned to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
25 Dec 1943 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
26 Dec 1943 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands before departing after dark bound for a bombardment strike against Bougainville.
27 Dec 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis bombard Kieta and Numa Numa Plantation on the north shore of Bougainville.
29 Dec 1943 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
8 Jan 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands and that evening conducted a bombardment strike against the Shortland Islands south of Bougainville.
9 Jan 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis shifted to the west of Torokina to cover landing of reinforcements there.
10 Jan 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
27 Jan 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
28 Jan 1944 At sea, cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis met with cruisers USS Montpelier, USS Cleveland, and USS Columbia and conducted fleet exercises. Honolulu and St. Louis then departed for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
30 Jan 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
10 Feb 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
11 Feb 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
13 Feb 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound to support the landings at Green Island north of Bougainville.
14 Feb 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis came under attack by four Aichi D3A 'Val' dive-bombers. St. Louis was struck by one bomb that exploded within the ship, killing 23 and wounding 28.
15 Feb 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis covered the New Zealand landings on Green Island 140 miles east of Rabaul.
16 Feb 1944 USS St. Louis arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands and began making temporary repairs.
5 Apr 1944 At Tulagi, USS St. Louis was painted in Measure 32, Design 2C camouflage paint.
12 May 1944 USS Honolulu, USS Birmingham, and USS St. Louis departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for exercises in the northern Solomon Islands.
13 May 1944 USS Honolulu, USS Birmingham, and USS St. Louis arrived at Hathorn Sound at the south end of Kula Gulf.
16 May 1944 After three days of bombardment exercises, USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Hathorn Sound bound for Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
17 May 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
4 Jun 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Roi at Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, joining carriers USS Corregidor and USS Coral Sea while at sea.
5 Jun 1944 At sea, battleships USS New Mexico, USS Idaho, and USS Pennsylvania joined with aircraft carriers USS Corregidor and USS Coral Sea with cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis and continued on toward Kwajalein.
8 Jun 1944 Battleships USS New Mexico, USS Idaho, and USS Pennsylvania with aircraft carriers USS Corregidor and USS Coral Sea and cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis arrived at Roi at Kwajalein, Marshall Islands.
10 Jun 1944 Battleships USS New Mexico, USS Idaho, and USS Pennsylvania with aircraft carriers USS Corregidor and USS Coral Sea and cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Kwajalein bound for the invasion of the Mariana Islands.
14 Jun 1944 Cruisers USS Wichita, USS New Orleans, and USS St. Louis maintained station east of Tinian, Mariana Islands ready to offer counter-battery fire if needed while other ships bombarded Saipan.
15 Jun 1944 USS St. Louis bombarded Saipan, Mariana Islands. The formation was attacked by 16 Japanese dive bombers without damage.
16 Jun 1944 USS St. Louis shelled Guam, Mariana Islands.
22 Jun 1944 USS St. Louis entered the anchorage at Saipan for replenishment before putting to sea again.
25 Jun 1944 USS St. Louis departed the Mariana Islands bound for Eniwetok, Marshall Islands.
28 Jun 1944 USS St. Louis arrived at Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands.
14 Jul 1944 USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis departed Eniwetok, Marshall Islands bound for the Mariana Islands.
15 Jul 1944 While underway, USS St. Louis experience a racing engine that suggested a lost propeller or a broken shaft.
17 Jul 1944 USS St. Louis took station off Apra Point, Guam covering forces conducting reconnaissance and underwater demolition. During this time, a diver inspected St. Louis's propellers and found the No. 3 propeller and 39-feet of the shaft were missing.
18 Jul 1944 USS St. Louis joined with cruisers USS Wichita and USS Minneapolis for a bombardment of Asan Beach, Guam.
19 Jul 1944 Battleship USS Colorado with cruisers USS Wichita and USS St. Louis bombarded positions behind Agana Beach, Guam.
21 Jul 1944 USS St. Louis bombarded Agana Beach and positions behind it during the landings by US Marines and US Army troops on Guam.
30 Jul 1944 Battleships USS New Mexico and USS Idaho with cruisers USS San Francisco and USS St. Louis departed Guam in the Mariana Islands bound for Eniwetok in the Marshall Islands.
2 Aug 1944 Battleships USS New Mexico and USS Idaho with cruisers USS San Francisco and USS St. Louis arrived at Eniwetok, Marshall Islands.
3 Aug 1944 Battleship USS New Mexico with cruisers USS San Francisco and USS St. Louis departed Eniwetok, Marshall Islands bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
9 Aug 1944 Battleship USS New Mexico with cruisers USS San Francisco and USS St. Louis arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
10 Aug 1944 USS St. Louis departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii bound for San Pedro, California, United States.
16 Aug 1944 USS St. Louis arrived at San Pedro, California and entered Terminal Island drydocks for battle damage repairs and general overhaul.
24 Sep 1944 USS St. Louis was floated out of drydock at San Pedro, California and continued repair work dockside.
5 Oct 1944 USS St. Louis departed San Pedro, California for shakedown exercises off the California coast.
10 Oct 1944 USS St. Louis returned to San Pedro, California.
11 Oct 1944 USS St. Louis departed San Pedro, California bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
17 Oct 1944 USS St. Louis arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
30 Oct 1944 Cruisers USS St. Louis and Pasadena departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii bound for Eniwetok in the Marshall Islands.
5 Nov 1944 Cruisers USS St. Louis and Pasadena arrived at Eniwetok in the Marshall Islands, refueled, and departed the same day bound for Ulithi in the Caroline Islands.
8 Nov 1944 Cruisers USS St. Louis and Pasadena arrived at Ulithi Lagoon in the Caroline Islands. St. Louis reported to the Seventh Fleet and Pasadena joined the Fast Carrier Task Force.
12 Nov 1944 Cruiser USS St. Louis and destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Taylor departed Ulithi in the Caroline Islands bound for Kossol Roads, Palau.
14 Nov 1944 Battleship USS Maryland with cruisers USS St. Louis and USS Columbia and destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Taylor, USS Lang, USS McCord, USS Trathen, USS Hazelwood, and USS MacDonough departed Kossol Roads, Palau bound for Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
16 Nov 1944 Battleship USS Maryland with cruisers USS St. Louis and USS Columbia and destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Taylor, USS Lang, USS McCord, USS Trathen, USS Hazelwood, and USS MacDonough arrived at Leyte Gulf, Philippines and joined a task group patrolling the gulf’s entrance.
27 Nov 1944 US Navy Task Group 77.2 consisting of battleships USS Maryland, USS West Virginia, USS Colorado, and USS New Mexico, cruisers USS Denver, USS St. Louis, USS Columbia, USS Minneapolis, and USS Montpelier, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Waller, USS Eaton, USS Cony, USS Mustin, USS Conway, USS Pringle, USS Lang, USS Sigourney, USS Saufley, USS Aulick, USS Renshaw, USS Taylor, USS Edwards, and USS Mugford, tanker USS Caribou, and other patrol craft were patrolling in Leyte Gulf, Philippines when the group came under a concentrated Japanese special air attack from 20 to 30 aircraft. All but two of the Japanese planes dived on the formation in the sustained attack. Submarine chaser SC-744 was sunk and battleship Colorado and cruisers St. Louis and Montpelier were damaged.
29 Nov 1944 USS Colorado and USS St. Louis departed Leyte Gulf bound for Manus, Admiralty Islands.
2 Dec 1944 While transiting from Leyte to Manus, USS St. Louis struck an underwater object that damaged her No. 2 propeller.
4 Dec 1944 USS St. Louis arrived at Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands.
8 Dec 1944 USS St. Louis entered floating drydock USS ABSD-4 in Papitalai Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands.
9 Dec 1944 With one propeller removed, USS St. Louis was floated out of floating drydock USS ABSD-4 in Papitalai Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands and departed Manus with USS Maryland bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
19 Dec 1944 USS Maryland and USS St. Louis arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
20 Dec 1944 USS St. Louis departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii bound for San Pedro, California, United States.
26 Dec 1944 USS St. Louis arrived at the Naval Drydocks at San Pedro, California.
30 Dec 1944 Captain John Griggs came aboard USS St. Louis at San Pedro, California as a prospective commanding officer.
31 Dec 1944 USS St. Louis entered Drydock #1 at the Naval Drydocks in San Pedro, California along with seaplane tender USS Norton Sound.
3 Jan 1945 At San Pedro, California, Captain John Griggs relieved Captain Ralph Roberts as commanding officer of cruiser USS St. Louis.
30 Jan 1945 A ship's party for all hands from USS St. Louis was held at the Long Beach Municipal Auditorium.
6 Feb 1945 USS St. Louis was floated out of Drydock #1 at the Naval Drydocks in San Pedro, California and shifted to Pier #1.
16 Feb 1945 USS St. Louis departed San Pedro, California for shakedown exercises off the California coast.
22 Feb 1945 USS St. Louis returned to San Pedro, California.
23 Feb 1945 USS St. Louis departed San Pedro, California bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
1 Mar 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
4 Mar 1945 USS St. Louis departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii bound for Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
10 Mar 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands, refueled, and departed again bound for Ulithi in the Caroline Islands.
13 Mar 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
14 Mar 1945 USS Yorktown (Essex-class), USS Enterprise, USS Intrepid, USS Langley (Independence-class), USS Flint, USS San Diego, and USS St. Louis departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands to resume raids on Japan in support of the Okinawa operations.
18 Mar 1945 USS Yorktown (Essex-class), USS Enterprise, USS Intrepid, USS Langley (Independence-class), USS Flint, USS San Diego, and USS St. Louis arrived in the operating area off Japan and began launching strikes on airfields on Kyushu, Honshu, and Shikoku. The task group came under air attack almost as soon as operations began. Yorktown and Enterprise were struck by single bombs that resulted in minimal casualties and minimal damage.
19 Mar 1945 USS Yorktown (Essex-class), USS Enterprise, USS Intrepid, USS Langley (Independence-class), USS Flint, USS San Diego, and USS St. Louis continued air operations against the three southernmost islands of Japan.
26 Mar 1945 As USS St. Louis was conducting a shore bombardment of Okinawa, one torpedo passed ahead of the ship and another behind.
28 Mar 1945 USS St. Louis conducted a shore bombardment of Okinawa, continuing for the next two days.
31 Mar 1945 USS St. Louis rearmed at Kerama Retto and conducted additional bombardments of Okinawa.
28 May 1945 USS St. Louis departed the Okinawa area bound for Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
31 May 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at San Pedro Bay, Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
15 Jun 1945 USS St. Louis departed San Pedro Bay, Leyte bound for Okinawa.
18 Jun 1945 USS St. Louis arrived in the waters around Okinawa.
15 Jul 1945 USS St. Louis anchored in Buckner Bay, Okinawa
17 Jul 1945 USS St. Louis departed Buckner Bay, Okinawa and resumed patrols and training around Okinawa.
31 Jul 1945 USS St. Louis anchored in Buckner Bay, Okinawa
1 Aug 1945 USS St. Louis departed Buckner Bay, Okinawa and resumed patrols and training around Okinawa.
7 Aug 1945 USS St. Louis anchored in Buckner Bay, Okinawa
13 Aug 1945 Following an aerial torpedo damaging USS Pennsylvania in Buckner Bay, Okinawa the day before, USS St. Louis began retiring to sea every night before returning to Buckner Bay every morning.
17 Aug 1945 USS St. Louis departed Buckner Bay, Okinawa bound for Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
20 Aug 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
27 Aug 1945 Cruisers USS St. Louis and USS Nashville with four destroyers were designated the Yangtze Patrol Force.
3 Sep 1945 USS St. Louis and USS Nashville departed Subic Bay, Philippines bound for Okinawa.
6 Sep 1945 USS St. Louis and USS Nashville arrived at Buckner Bay, Okinawa.
7 Sep 1945 USS Nashville and USS St. Louis departed Okinawa bound for the Chusan Islands off Shanghai, China.
8 Sep 1945 USS Nashville and USS St. Louis arrived in the area of the Chusan Islands off Shanghai, China covering two days of search sweeps looking for Japanese suicide boat bases and airfields.
11 Sep 1945 USS St. Louis departed the area of Shanghai, China bound for Okinawa.
13 Sep 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at Hagushi Beach anchorage, Okinawa.
16 Sep 1945 USS St. Louis departed Okinawa due to an approaching typhoon.
18 Sep 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at Hagushi Beach anchorage, Okinawa.
26 Sep 1945 USS St. Louis departed Okinawa bound for Shanghai, China.
29 Sep 1945 USS St. Louis anchored in the Hwangpoo River (now Huangpu River), Shanghai, China.
6 Oct 1945 Commanding officer of USS St. Louis, Captain John Griggs, was assigned to coordinate the movement of the Chinese 70th Army from Ningpo, China (now Ningbo) to Kiirun, Formosa (now Keelung, Taiwan).
11 Oct 1945 USS St. Louis departed Shanghai, China bound for Ningpo (now Ningbo) but was redirected while en route to Kiirun, Formosa (now Keelung, Taiwan).
15 Oct 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at Kiirun, Formosa (now Keelung, Taiwan).
20 Oct 1945 USS St. Louis departed Kiirun, Formosa (now Keelung, Taiwan) bound for Guam.
24 Oct 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam, Mariana Islands.
25 Oct 1945 USS St. Louis departed Guam bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
2 Nov 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
3 Nov 1945 USS St. Louis departed Pearl Harbor bound for San Francisco, California, United States.
9 Nov 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at San Francisco, California.
13 Nov 1945 USS St. Louis departed San Francisco bound for Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands as part of Operation Magic Carpet. St. Louis was to pick up as many US personnel as the ship could accommodate for return to the United States.
14 Dec 1945 USS St. Louis arrived at San Pedro, California and disembarked 850 US servicemen brought home from Guadalcanal, Espiritu Santo, and Samoa.
4 Jun 1946 During the ship's decommissioning overhaul, Commander Andrew Smith relieved Captain John Griggs as commanding officer of cruiser USS St. Louis.
20 Jun 1946 St. Louis was decommissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard and placed in the reserve fleet.
29 Jan 1951 The ex-St. Louis was sold to Brazil and became the Brazilian cruiser TamandarĂ©.
28 Jun 1976 The Brazilian cruiser TamandarĂ©, the former USS St. Louis, was decommissioned for the final time.
5 Aug 1980 The former Brazilian cruiser TamandarĂ©, which even earlier had been the USS St. Louis, was sold to Superwinton Enterprises in Taiwan for scrapping.
24 Aug 1980 As the former Brazilian cruiser TamandarĂ©, which even earlier had been the USS St. Louis, was being towed to Taiwan for scrapping, the ship foundered and sank off South Africa.




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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. william Sarratt says:
12 Apr 2010 05:27:49 AM

Can anyone shed some light as to what may have happened or did they know seamen Algie Reed.He is my wife's uncle and she is trying to find out and pay honor to him and the crew of the Saint Louis.We have very little info if any.I also think she is trying to help her dad find out whom himself is getting later in life.Please help if you can.

God Bless America
2. Ken Storm says:
25 Apr 2010 10:39:55 AM

Hi
I do not know of your Algie Reed but I am researching the Reed line and have been working on Levi Algie Reed. Since it it not a common name I was wondering if there may be a connection. These Reeds were from Kentucky and then Missouri. Any thoughts?
Ken
3. Anonymous says:
14 Jul 2011 11:18:22 AM

My uncle was killed aboard the USS ST. LOUIS...Nov., 27th 1944. I would like to find pictures of him and his crew. How do I go about doing that? Thanks
4. Anonymous says:
3 Sep 2012 08:46:58 PM

Any information on John A. Macaulay. He was assigned to the St. Louis throughout the war. He is from New Jersey and settled in San Francisco.

Thanks
5. Anonymous says:
26 Jul 2017 05:51:15 PM

Does anyone have info on Anthony Perille. He was on the St. Louis during the bombing of Pearl Harbor?
6. Commenter identity confirmed David Stubblebine says:
26 Jul 2017 07:09:30 PM

Anonymous (above):
The St Louis Muster Rolls list Anthony Perille, service number 300 34 07, who enlisted 24 Jan 1941 at Chicago IL, being received aboard as an Apprentice Seaman on 13 Apr 1941 from the Great Lakes Training Center. He was advanced to Seaman 2nd-class on 24 May 1941 and again to Seaman 1st-class on 1 Jan 1942. He was reduced back to Seaman 2nd-class on 17 Mar 1942 following a summary court martial for insolence to a petty officer. He is last mentioned in the St Louis Muster Rolls on 30 Sep 1942 with no indication of when or where he was transferred off the ship. For more about his Navy days, request a copy of his service record. See http://ww2db.com/faq/#3.

For more about the St Louis during the Pearl Harbor Attack, see the two links under “Document(s)” above right. Seaman Perille is not mentioned in these reports but the ship was pretty active during and following the attack (don’t believe the parts about the midget submarine sighting, however; history has shown these observations were almost certainly incorrect).
7. Anonymous says:
30 Jul 2017 05:54:39 PM

Thank so much for the info. He was my Father and passed in 2008.
8. Anonymous says:
11 Dec 2017 03:32:53 PM

Any information on Lt. Jr. Grade Burdett Bernard Berton who was killed on the St. Louis near Green Island 2/14/1944. Does anyone have any crew photos? He was my grandfather - he left a wife and a 6 and 2 year old.
9. Vernon Byrd Jr. says:
8 Jan 2020 09:42:13 AM

My uncle, James Aubrey Byrd, enlisted in the Navy on December 8, 1941 as a 17 year old. He served aboard the St. Louis for the entire war and told me of the torpedo attack which severely damaged the bow of the ship. He said that they travelled across the Pacific to reach Mare Island Navy Yard where a new bow would be installed. He said that there was not a,dry eye on board the ship as thy passed,under the Golden Gate Brisge because they made only 6 knots speed during the ,trip and were a good, slow target for any *** sub in the way. The kamikaze attacks and loss of life aboard he ship took its toll on him because he turned to alcohol to forget. Not possible and he lived the memories until his death.
10. H. Winship Dowell says:
10 Jan 2021 01:32:53 PM

My Uncle, James R. McCormick was a crew member throughout the war. He was on board during the attack on Pearl Harbor and was with the ship until the end of the war. I think he was the navigator. He stayed in the Navy and retired as an Rear Admiral.

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Search WW2DB
More on St. Louis
Personnel:
» Ainsworth, Walden

Event(s) Participated:
» United States Neutrality Patrol
» Attack on Pearl Harbor
» Battle of Midway and the Aleutian Islands
» Solomon Islands Campaign
» New Guinea-Papua Campaign, Phase 3
» Mariana Islands Campaign and the Great Turkey Shoot
» Okinawa Campaign
» Japan's Surrender

Document(s):
» US Navy Report of Japanese Raid on Pearl Harbor, Enclosure E, USS St. Louis (1)
» US Navy Report of Japanese Raid on Pearl Harbor, Enclosure E, USS St. Louis (2)

Light Cruiser St. Louis (CL-49) Photo Gallery
Schematic drawing of the St. Louis sub-class of the United States Brooklyn-class light cruiser, of which there were two.
See all 35 photographs of Light Cruiser St. Louis (CL-49)


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