USS Nicholas file photo [32579]

Nicholas

CountryUnited States
Ship ClassFletcher-class Destroyer
Hull NumberDD-449
BuilderBath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, United States
Laid Down3 Mar 1941
Launched19 Feb 1942
Commissioned4 Jun 1943
Decommissioned12 Jun 1946
Displacement2,050 tons standard; 2,924 tons full
Length376 feet
Beam40 feet
Draft18 feet
Machinery4 oil-fired boilers, 2 Westinghouse geared steam turbines, 2 screws
Power Output60,000 shaft horsepower
Speed36 knots
Range6,500nm at 15 knots
Crew273
ArmamentAs built: 5x5in/38, 4x1.1in, 6x20mm, 2x5x21in torpedo tubes, 6x depth charge projectors, 2x depth charge racks
Recommission19 Feb 1951
Final Decommission03 Jan 1970

Contributor:

ww2dbaseFletcher-class destroyer Nicholas was laid down at the Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine, United States on 3 Mar 1941. An earlier destroyer USS Nicholas (Clemson-class DD-311) was lost in the Honda Point Disaster of 8 Sep 1923. Both ships were named for Samuel Nicholas, the first officer commissioned into the Continental Marines, the first officer to lead an amphibious landing of troops for the United States, and generally considered the first commandant of the Marine Corps (although that was not his title).

ww2dbaseThe Fletcher-class Nicholas was launched 19 Feb 1942 with Samuel Nicholas's great-great granddaughter, Mrs. Florence Tryon, as sponsor (Mrs. Tryon also sponsored the third USS Nicholas in 1984). USS Nicholas was commissioned on 4 Jun 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts, United States with Lieutenant Commander William Brown in command. After a shakedown period, Nicholas was assigned to escort battleship USS South Dakota from Maine to the Delaware Capes. During that transit, on 25 Jul 1942, the destroyer dropped five depth charges on a suspicious sound contact. Although there were no observable results, these were Nicholas's first shots of the war.

ww2dbaseOn 23 Aug 1942, Nicholas departed New York as an escort for battleship USS Washington bound for the Panama Canal. At Panama, Nicholas's commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander William Brown, was promoted to full Commander. Washington and Nicholas transited the canal on 28 Aug 1942 and sailed southwest toward Tongatabu, Tonga.

ww2dbaseNicholas crossed the equator for the first time on 1 Sep 1942, 500 miles west of the Galapagos Islands. After stopping briefly at Tonga, Nicholas proceeded independently to Nouméa, New Caledonia. Nicholas began escorting supply convoys between staging bases at Nouméa, Efate, Espiritu Santo, and Guadalcanal. Nicholas first arrived off Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands on 2 Oct 1942 with aerial combat going on overhead. The following morning, Nicholas was directed to pick up a downed Marine Corps pilot who had parachuted into the water. As Nicholas was responding, a Japanese aircraft attacked the man (unsuccessfully) and Nicholas fired back. These were Nicholas's first shots at a hostile enemy; they would not be the last.

ww2dbaseMore convoy escorts followed. On 22 Oct 1942 as Nicholas arrived at Guadalcanal escorting a convoy resupply ships, the destroyer was directed to provide direct support fire for the Marines ashore. Nicholas landed over 1,200 shells on targets as directed by Marine spotters before taking aboard twelve wounded Marines for transportation to the Naval Hospital at Nouméa.

ww2dbaseOn 25 Oct 1942, Nicholas joined a task force of heavy ships bound for patrol duty around Savo Island, Solomon Islands. On joining the task force at sea, Nicholas came alongside the flagship, USS Washington. As the two ships drew close together, Nicholas's anchor pressed hard against Washington's side causing minor damage to Nicholas but none to Washington.

ww2dbaseFor the next several weeks, Nicholas continued with this pattern of escorting resupply convoys, escorting larger warships on patrols, and direct infantry support fire. On 16 Jan 1943 at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides Captain Robert Briscoe, commander of Nicholas's destroyer squadron, shifted his pennant to USS Nicholas. Briscoe's destroyer group, Destroyer Squadron 5 (DesRon5), was informally known as the Cactus Striking Force. For most of the rest of World War II, Nicholas would serve as her destroyer squadron's flagship.

ww2dbaseOn 24 Jan 1943, Nicholas escorted cruisers USS Nashville and USS Helena on a nighttime bombardment of Vila airstrip on Kolombangara, Solomon Islands. Upon returning to Tulagi, Nicholas had a routine change of command with Nicholas's executive officer, Lieutenant Commander Andrew Hill, relieving Commander Brown as the ship's commanding officer.

ww2dbaseThe following week, Nicholas and sister-ship USS DeHaven screened the landing of Army troops at Verahue on western Guadalcanal. While escorting the transport ships back to base after the landings, Nicholas and DeHaven came under an intense Japanese dive-bomber attack. DeHaven took three bomb hits with one setting off her forward magazine. The ship broke in two and sank quickly. Nicholas was lucky to receive only minor damage and joined the transports in picking up DeHaven survivors. 167 were killed aboard DeHaven and two aboard Nicholas.

ww2dbaseAt Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides on 10 Mar 1943, USS Nicholas transferred from Destroyer Squadron 5 (DesRon5) to Destroyer Squadron 21 (DesRon21) with Commander Francis McInerney in command, again operating from Nicholas. Assignments for the Cactus Striking Force were beginning to involve fewer convoy escorts in the rear areas and more offensive missions in the forward areas. These included shore bombardments of Japanese positions in the northern Solomons and night patrols up the "Slot" (New Georgia Sound). On 13 May 1943, Nicholas and four other destroyers escorted three cruisers on a night bombardment along the shores of Kula Gulf, Solomon Islands. After Nicholas fired 720 shells through her five 5-inch guns, her guns overheated and a shell lodged in the barrel of her No. 3 gun. After a few minutes in the hot gun, the shell exploded and tore apart the gun turret. Destroyer USS Chevalier suffered a similar explosion in her No. 4 gun. There were no injuries on either ship.

ww2dbaseAfter repairs, Nicholas returned to Kula Gulf six weeks later on 5 Jul 1943 in support of the landings at Rice Anchorage on New Georgia. Nicholas was in a force of three cruisers and four destroyers tasked with shelling Japanese positions along both sides of the gulf. At the same time, four Japanese destroyers entered the gulf from the north. Upon seeing the flashes from the American guns in the darkness, the Japanese commander chose to withdraw but as his ships turned, three destroyers launched a total of fourteen Type 93 "Long Lance" torpedoes toward the gun flashes. At a range of 22,000 yards (11 nautical miles), one of the torpedoes struck and sank destroyer USS Strong. This is believed to be the longest successful torpedo attack of the war. The Americans never detected the presence of the Japanese destroyers and believed Strong had struck a mine or was torpedoed by a submarine.

ww2dbaseThe next night, Nicholas returned to the same part of the island chain, again with a task unit of three cruisers and four destroyers. In New Georgia Sound at the opening to Kula Gulf, the Americans engaged a Japanese force of ten destroyers. Light cruiser USS Helena (St. Louis-class) fired first. As her guns roared in the darkness, the flashes made a good aiming point and Japanese destroyers Suzukaze and Tanikaze launched Type 93 torpedoes toward the gunfire. The first torpedo to strike Helena caused her bow section to buckle and break away. The second and third torpedoes flooded Helena's engine rooms and the cruiser started settling quickly. Nicholas and destroyer USS Radford stood by to take aboard Helena's crew. Four whaleboats were lowered to search for men in the water. Nicholas had to break away twice to investigate surface contacts so Radford played the primary role in gathering the survivors. Radford brought aboard 444 men and Nicholas 291. All of the Helena sailors were covered in fuel oil and required some degree of medical attention. All four whaleboats were left behind for the benefit of any men who might still be in the water. As Nicholas was departing the area, she exchanged gunfire and torpedoes with Japanese destroyers Amagiri and Mochizuki, which, ironically, were still in the area picking up survivors from the sunken Niizuki. Nicholas and Radford then withdrew to Tulagi.

ww2dbaseWhile all of that was going on just outside Kula Gulf, Japanese destroyers carrying 2,600 reinforcement troops successfully made their run through the gulf and delivered the troops to Vila on southern Kolombangara. For this reason, the Battle of Kula Gulf is largely seen as a tactical draw but a strategic victory for the Japanese. Nevertheless, Nicholas's commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander Hill, and the commander of Destroyer Squadron 21, Captain McInerney aboard Nicholas, were each awarded the Navy Cross for their actions in this engagement.

ww2dbaseFollowing this battle, Nicholas escorted the cruisers on their withdrawal to Espiritu Santo for regrouping before returning up the "Slot" to Kula Gulf again on 12 Jul 1943. The cruiser force still consisted of three cruisers but the destroyer force was more than doubled from earlier sorties. Shortly after midnight on 13 Jul 1943, this force engaged a Japanese cruiser and five destroyers in New Georgia Sound in what would become known as the Battle of Kolombangara. Nicholas led the five destroyers of DesRon21 in a charging torpedo attack while the cruisers squared off for a gunnery battle. Almost immediately, Japanese cruiser Jintsu came under withering cruiser fire and torpedoes from Nicholas hit Jintsu before she sank. All three Allied cruisers were damaged by torpedoes. Destroyers USS Woodworth and USS Buchanan were damaged in a collision. Radar indicated some Japanese destroyers were breaking off and heading into Kula Gulf and Nicholas led two other destroyers in pursuit, but without results. Japanese destroyer Yukikaze and US destroyer Gwin were each badly damaged. USS Ralph Talbot and USS Maury went to Gwin's aid and took aboard 208 of her crew. Ralph Talbot then scuttled Gwin with torpedoes before the Allied force withdrew to Tulagi.

ww2dbaseNicholas's commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander Hill, and the commander of Destroyer Squadron 21, Captain McInerney aboard Nicholas, were each awarded the Silver Star for their actions in this engagement. Again, the Japanese accomplished their mission to land reinforcement troops at Vila but, in the larger strategic view, the war was reaching a tipping point where the Japanese were less able to absorb losses while American industry was growing increasingly able to augment American resources. As a war of attrition, the tables were beginning to turn from what they had been at Coral Sea.

ww2dbaseOn the night of 15 Jul 1943, acting on reports from an Australian coast-watcher, Nicholas and her squadron-mates returned to the "Slot" as a covering force for ships sent to pick up more Helena survivors who had made it to the neighboring island of Vella Lavella. This rescuing force traveled beyond Kolombangara, farther up the "Slot" that any Allied ships had ventured thus far in the campaign and very close to the Japanese forward operating base at Buin on Bougainville. After successfully recovering the Helena survivors and as the ships began their retirement, Radford came across an American whaleboat with two men in it. Radford took aboard two Japanese sailors from Jintsu sunk three nights earlier. Later, Nicholas came across another Japanese sailor on a raft but he refused to be rescued.

ww2dbaseFor the next operating period, Nicholas and her squadron-mates acted as escorts for convoys between the Solomon Islands and Espiritu Santo. On 20 Jul 1943 as they were escorting Australian cruisers 200 miles west of Espiritu Santo, HMAS Hobart was struck by a torpedo. Nicholas and Radford stayed with the damaged Hobart as she limped into Espiritu Santo two days later.

ww2dbaseOn 7 Aug 1943 while at Nouméa, New Caledonia, Destroyer Squadron 21, USS Nicholas flagship, experienced a routine change of command with Captain Thomas J. Ryan relieving Captain McInerney. Captain Ryan was a 1923 Medal of Honor recipient and had just completed service as commander of DesRon12 where he had been awarded the Navy Cross a month earlier for actions during the landings at Rendova in the Solomon Islands.

ww2dbaseBy 15 Aug 1943, Nicholas was back in the Solomon Islands covering the Allied landings at Barakoma on Vella Lavella. In the early morning darkness of 18 Aug 1943, Nicholas led three other destroyers in an interdiction sweep up the "Slot." The group engaged a Japanese formation of four destroyers escorting thirteen landing barges to a new base at Horaniu on Vella Lavella. The Japanese destroyers drew the Americans out to open water while the barges took refuge in the many coves along Vella Lavella's northern shore. After the opposing destroyer groups exchanged gunfire and torpedoes without appreciable results, the Americans returned to Vella Lavella where they were able to sink two small Japanese escorts, two motor torpedo boats, and at least one barge. After Nicholas had fired 750 rounds from her 5-inch guns in rapid succession, her No. 1 and No. 2 guns both overheated and jammed. This made no difference this time since the ship had finished her bombardment and the guns functioned properly again once they cooled down.

ww2dbaseDespite neither side being truly pleased with how this engagement unfolded, Nicholas's commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander Hill, was awarded his second Navy Cross for his actions this night. The Japanese were ultimately successful in establishing the base at Horaniu and over the next several weeks, it was through this base that the Japanese were able to successfully evacuate 9,000 troops from the bypassed Kolombangara Island.

ww2dbaseOn 25 Aug 1943, Nicholas and DesRon21 acted as a covering force for a group of minelayers sowing mines southwest of Kolombangara where Blackett Strait joins Vella Gulf. Coincidentally, these were the same waters where PT-109 was destroyed and sunk three weeks earlier.

ww2dbaseThe following night, Nicholas and Desron12 made one more sweep of Vella Gulf before retiring to Nouméa, New Caledonia. Nicholas went alongside destroyer tender USS Whitney for a period of tender repairs including two days in a floating drydock. Nicholas returned to convoy duty with runs to Milne Bay, New Guinea, Brisbane, Australia, Nouméa, and then back to the Guadalcanal area in Oct 1943. Upon arrival at Tulagi on 3 Oct 1943, DesRon21, USS Nicholas flagship, experienced a routine change of command with Commander Alvin Chandler relieving Captain Ryan.

ww2dbasePatrols up the "Slot" resumed with sinking the occasional small craft and escorting convoys in support of the Vella Lavella operations before departing the Solomon Island area. When Nicholas and DesRon21 detached from the South Pacific fighting forces, Admiral William Halsey dispatched this message to all ships of the squadron:

"On your detachment from the South Pacific fighting forces, I wish you Godspeed. Your habit of getting into winning scraps with the Japs has made history ... DesRon TWENTY-ONE always will be remembered when Cactus, Munda, Kula, Vella and the Slot are mentioned. You may be sure I will welcome you back with open arms anytime, any ocean. -Halsey"

ww2dbaseA month later, Nicholas joined the screen for aircraft carriers USS Yorktown, USS Lexington (both Essex-class), and USS Cowpens as they launched strikes against the Marshall Island atolls of Makin, Mili, and Jaluit over six consecutive days from 19 to 25 Nov 1943, and then Kwajalein on 4 Dec 1943. Nicholas continued screening the carriers as they retired toward Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, arriving on 9 Dec 1943.

ww2dbaseThe following day while still at Pearl Harbor, Commander Robert Keith relieved Commander Hill as Nicholas's commanding officer. Five days later, Nicholas entered Mare Island Naval Shipyard in California to begin an overhaul period. After a month, Nicholas departed San Francisco Bay bound for Pearl Harbor. The same day, sister-ship USS O'Bannon departed San Diego also bound for Pearl Harbor. The two ships met at sea and continued on together, arriving on 26 Jan 1944.

ww2dbaseTwo days later, Admiral Chester Nimitz and Rear Admiral James Kauffman, Commander Destroyers Pacific, came aboard USS Nicholas and presented the ship's company with a Presidential Unit Citation for their performance in rescuing men from USS Helena during the action at Kula Gulf on 5-6 July 1943. During his remarks, Nimitz referenced the Solomon Island campaign by saying, "The record of the Nicholas is in a sense the record of one entire phase of the Pacific war."

ww2dbaseNicholas departed Pearl Harbor screening escort carriers bound for the Solomon Islands, arriving at Tulagi on 21 Mar 1944. On 5 Apr 1944, Nicholas departed the Solomon Islands for New Guinea where she spent several days being outfitted with new radio equipment to be a fighter director ship. Nicholas then served as part of the covering force for the landings at Aitape and Hollandia, New Guinea. On 8 May 1944, Nicholas returned to the Solomon Islands. After reforming with the rest of DesRon21, the squadron sailed north to the northern shore of New Ireland Island where they executed an eight-hour bombardment of a Japanese staging area at Madina. Nicholas then spent two weeks as part of a submarine hunter-killer group centered around escort carrier USS Hoggatt Bay in the shipping lanes between Truk and Rabaul. On 10 Jun 1944, Nicholas's squadron-mate USS Taylor made a successful depth charge attack against Japanese submarine RO-111.

ww2dbaseOn 18 Jul 1944 at Blanche Harbor in the Treasury Islands, Destroyer Squadron 21 had a routine change of command with Captain John Ginder relieving Captain Chandler. Nicholas spent the next several weeks on assignments in the Solomon Islands and sailing to and from Seeadler Harbor in the Admiralty Islands. Nicholas then staged at Hollandia, New Guinea for the impending invasion of Morotai in the Molucca Islands. In the days following those landings, Nicholas escorted resupply convoys to and from Morotai before entering a period of tender repairs alongside USS Dobbin at Hollandia.

ww2dbaseOn 23 Oct 1944, Nicholas entered Leyte Gulf in the Philippines as the Leyte Gulf invasion operations were still unfolding. Two days later, Nicholas screened Rear Admiral Jesse Oldendorf's battleship and cruiser column as they made their withdrawal after the Battle of Surigao Strait. Nicholas spent the following three weeks escorting ships between Leyte Gulf, Seeadler Harbor, and Ulithi in the Caroline Islands. On 13 Nov 1944, 240 miles east of Palau while escorting the cruiser USS St. Louis, Nicholas made sonar contact with a submarine. Nicholas made a depth charge attack and sank Japanese Type-B1 submarine I-38.

ww2dbaseNicholas then joined a battleship force screened by cruisers and destroyers for a three-week assignment patrolling the entrance to Leyte Gulf in the Philippines. On 27 Nov 1944, this force came under an intense aerial attack from 20 to 30 Japanese special attack aircraft. In a sustained attack that lasted most of the afternoon, all but two of the airplanes dived on the ships. Nicholas anti-aircraft batteries fired on any target within range. Sub-chaser USS SC-744 was sunk and battleship USS Colorado and cruisers USS St. Louis and USS Montpelier were damaged. The next day, the task group commander specifically ordered Nicholas to fire on a US B-25 Mitchell bomber that was dropping objects near the formation. After Nicholas fired the proverbial "shot across her bow," the bomber left the area undamaged. The day after that, another aerial special attack damaged battleship USS Maryland and destroyers USS Saufley and USS Aulick.

ww2dbaseOn the night of 6-7 Dec 1944, Nicholas and destroyers of DesRon21 made a sweep of Ormoc Bay on the opposite side of Leyte. Finding no Japanese shipping, they conducted a shore bombardment along Apali Point west of Ormoc. Nicholas departed the Philippines the following day for more convoy escort duty touching Hollandia, Seeadler Harbor, Palau, and back to Leyte Gulf. There, Nicholas joined the build-up for the Lingayen Gulf operations on Luzon, Philippines.

ww2dbaseOn 4 Jan 1945, Nicholas and DesRon21 departed Leyte Gulf leading the invasion force bound for Lingayen Gulf. On 5 Jan 1945 as the invasion force rounded the southern tip of Negros Island bound for the Sulu Sea, two torpedoes from a midget submarine passed directly in front of Nicholas. Nicholas and USS Taylor attacked. A TBM Avenger from the combat air patrol dropped an aerial depth charge on the submarine as Taylor charged. Taylor simultaneously rammed and depth charged the submarine causing it to break apart and sink.

ww2dbaseNicholas and the invasion force experienced near daily aerial attacks on the way north to Lingayen Gulf. On arrival at the mouth of Lingayen Gulf on 8 Jan 1945, DesRon21 with Nicholas split off to join the aircraft carrier covering force that operated west of Luzon providing air cover for advancing and retiring convoys. On 6 Feb 1945 at Mangarin Bay on Mindoro, Philippines, Commander Dennis Lyndon relieved Commander Keith as commanding officer of USS Nicholas.

ww2dbaseBeginning on 13 Feb 1945, Nicholas and DesRon21 escorted cruisers USS Phoenix and USS Boise on three days of shore bombardment on southern Bataan, Luzon. On 8 Mar 1945, Nicholas and DesRon21 covered the minesweeping operations near Zamboanga on Mindanao in advance of the landings two days later. On 26 Mar 1945, Nicholas again covered pre-invasion minesweepers ahead of the landings on Cebu Island. On 15 Apr 1945, Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, and cruiser USS Phoenix began two days of pre-invasion bombardments of Carabao Island at the entrance to Manila Bay, Philippines.

ww2dbaseOn 24 Apr 1945, Nicholas left the Philippines as part of a task group heading for Tarakan Island, Borneo, Dutch East Indies. After a week of supporting the pre-invasion minesweeping operations at Tarakan, Nicholas and her task group returned to the Philippines where Nicholas entered a floating drydock for two days of general upkeep. Nicholas, O'Bannon, and Taylor then joined the screen for the Third Fleet's Escort Carrier Task Force bound for Okinawa. After only three days of screening the carrier operations east of Okinawa, the destroyers were detached to return Leyte. From there, they escorted the cruiser USS Detroit to Ulithi in the Caroline Islands. At Ulithi on 30 Jun 1945, the commander of DesRon21, Captain Ginder, detached without relief and departed for the United States.

ww2dbaseNicholas left Ulithi on 3 Jul 1945 as an escort for a group of oilers, ammunition ships, and stores ships en route to refuel and rearm the Fast Carrier Task Force carrying out aerial strikes against Japan. During the carriers' last refueling rendezvous on 11 Aug 1945, Nicholas was transferred to the carrier screen. Nicholas was serving in this capacity when hostilities ended. While still at sea, Captain Harry Heneberger came aboard Nicholas on 20 Aug 1945 as Commander of DesRon21 after having formally taken command of the squadron at Pearl Harbor a month earlier.

ww2dbaseUpon Japan's surrender, preparations began immediately for accepting the formal surrender, disarming Japanese forces, and repatriating prisoners of war. Admiral Halsey was tasked with arranging for the fleet's entry into Tokyo Bay. Halsey, aboard USS Missouri, specifically selected destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor to escort his flagship. He chose these veterans of the Cactus Striking Force as recognition for their service from the early days of slugging their way up the Solomon Island chain, through the Philippines, and all the way to Japan. On 27 Aug 1945, Nicholas met with Japanese destroyer Hatuzakura at sea and took aboard two Japanese Navy captains, six Japanese interpreters, and 13 harbor pilots. The two captains, one interpreter, and one pilot were transferred to Missouri with the other personnel transferred to other ships of the fleet as required. Missouri, Nicholas, and her squadron-mates then anchored in Sagami Bay, Japan, within sight of Mount Fuji. On 29 Aug 1945 as Missouri became the first US warship to enter Tokyo Bay, Nicholas was at her side. Battleship USS Iowa trailed Missouri with O'Bannon at her side, and Taylor trailing.

ww2dbaseOn 1 Sep 1945, the day before the formal surrender signing ceremony aboard Missouri, Nicholas shifted to the Yokohama Customs House Pier and USS Lansdowne moored alongside. The next day, the Japanese surrender party of eleven officers and diplomats crossed Nicholas's deck to board Lansdowne for transportation to Missouri. Nicholas then took aboard 58 senior US Army officers and 29 senior officers from seven Allied nations for transportation to Missouri. After the ceremony, Lansdowne and Nicholas reversed the process before resuming their berths near Missouri.

ww2dbaseAs part of the effort to locate and release Allied prisoners of war, Nicholas departed Tokyo Bay for a brief stop off Hamamatsu before entering Ishinomaki Bay, Japan where she received aboard 250 released Allied prisoners representing four Allied nations. Nicholas brought these men to Tokyo Bay where they were transferred to troop ships or hospital ships, as needed.

ww2dbaseOn 1 Oct 1945, Nicholas departed Tokyo with a large formation of warships as part of Operation Magic Carpet. The group sailed to Okinawa where they embarked thousands of US servicemen for return to the United States. Nicholas arrived at Seattle, Washington, United States on 19 Oct 1945 before shifting to San Pedro, California. She began a deactivation overhaul on 7 Nov 1945, was decommissioned on 12 Jun 1946, and then placed in reserve.

ww2dbaseNicholas remained in "mothballs" until the Korean conflict when she began a recommissioning refit in Nov 1950. On 19 Feb 1951, USS Nicholas was recommissioned at Mare Island Naval Shipyard with Commander Harry Mason in command. Fittingly, she was recommissioned in a joint ceremony with USS O'Bannon, the ship that sat beside Nicholas on the ways at Bath Iron Works in Maine and sailed side-by-side with Nicholas through much of World War II. Nicholas and O'Bannon would go on to sail parallel paths throughout their second lives as well.

ww2dbaseNicholas made two tours to Korea followed by routine rotations to the Far East, including as a support ship for the Castle atomic bomb tests, and then three tours in Vietnam. In 1968, she was part of the recovery groups for the Apollo 7 and Apollo 8 space flight missions.

ww2dbaseOn 30 Jan 1970, having served as the Navy's oldest active destroyer for eight years already, USS Nicholas was decommissioned in a ceremony at Pearl Harbor, again side by side with O'Bannon. At the time they were retired, only seven other Fletcher-class destroyers remained in service with the United States Navy. Retired Rear Admiral Andrew Hill, Nicholas plank-owner, initial executive officer, and second commanding officer, travelled to Hawaii to be a present at Nicholas's decommissioning. He then arranged for the ship's bell to be placed on permanent display at the Marine Barracks in Washington, DC. Nicholas was towed from Pearl Harbor to Portland, Oregon, and broken up in 1972.

ww2dbaseNicholas earned 16 battle stars in World War II, 5 battle stars in Korea, and 9 battle stars in Vietnam. Measured only in terms of battle stars, this made USS Nicholas the most decorated ship in United States Navy history.

ww2dbaseSources:
United States Navy
CombinedFleet.com
NavSource Naval History
Military Times; Hall of Valor Military Medals Database
The Pacific War: The U.S. Navy
Destroyer History Foundation
PacificWrecks
Ships of the U.S. Navy in WWII "Dazzle" Camouflage
US Navy Warship Camouflage
United States Marine Corps
US Marine Corps University
UBoat.net
Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Jun 2023

Destroyer Nicholas (DD-449) Interactive Map

Photographs

The hulls of destroyers Nicholas (left) and O’Bannon (right) under construction at the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, United States, 1 Jan 1942. These two ships would be side-by-side for much of their careers.Dignitaries posing for pictures at the christening of the Fletcher-class destroyer Nicholas at the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, United States, 19 Feb 1942.Sponsor Mrs. Florence Tryon, great-great-granddaughter of the ship’s namesake Samuel Nicholas, preparing to christen the Fletcher-class destroyer Nicholas at the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, United States, 19 Feb 1942.Fletcher-class destroyer Nicholas on acceptance trials off Rockland, Maine, United States, 28 May 1942. Photo 1 of 3.
See all 46 photographs of Destroyer Nicholas (DD-449)

Maps

Track chart featuring the movements of USS Nicholas during the action of 16 Mar 1943 in Kula Gulf, Solomon Islands.

Nicholas Operational Timeline

3 Mar 1941 Fletcher-class destroyer Nicholas was laid down at the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, United States.
19 Feb 1942 Fletcher-class destroyer Nicholas was launched at the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, United States.
4 Jun 1942 USS Nicholas was commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts, United States with Lieutenant Commander William Brown in command.
27 Jun 1942 USS Nicholas departed Boston Navy Yard and began her shakedown period.
29 Jun 1942 After loading a full complement of torpedoes at Newport, Rhode Island, USS Nicholas departed for Casco Bay, Maine for shakedown exercises.
9 Jul 1942 USS Nicholas was diverted from shakedown exercises to investigate a possible submarine operating near Halfway Rock outside the Portland, Maine harbor. Nicholas searched throughout the night with no enemy contacts.
25 Jul 1942 As USS Nicholas escorted USS South Dakota from Casco Bay, Maine to the Delaware Capes, she made a sound contact and dropped 5 depth charges with no observable results. These were Nicholas’s first shots of the war.
31 Jul 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at Boston Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
2 Aug 1942 USS Massachusetts, with USS Nicholas as an escort, departed Boston Navy Yard bound for Norfolk, Virginia.
3 Aug 1942 USS Massachusetts, with USS Nicholas as an escort, arrived at Norfolk, Virginia. Nicholas departed immediately to return to Boston.
4 Aug 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at Boston Navy Yard.
15 Aug 1942 USS Nicholas departed Boston Navy Yard to act as an escort to USS Savannah bound for Norfolk, Virginia.
17 Aug 1942 USS Nicholas and USS Savannah arrived at Norfolk, Virginia. Nicholas departed the same day as an escort to USS Massachusetts bound for Casco Bay, Maine.
18 Aug 1942 USS Massachusetts, with USS Nicholas as an escort, arrived at Casco Bay, Maine. Nicholas continued to escort Massachusetts for several days as the battleship conducted training exercises in Casco Bay.
21 Aug 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York.
23 Aug 1942 USS Washington, with USS Nicholas as an escort, departed New York bound for the Panama Canal.
28 Aug 1942 USS Washington, with USS Nicholas as an escort, arrived at the Panama Canal, transited through, and docked at Balboa, Canal Zone.
29 Aug 1942 USS Washington, with USS Nicholas as an escort, departed Balboa, Canal Zone bound for Tongatabu, Tonga. USS Nicholas’s commanding officer, LtCdr William Brown, accepted his promotion to full Commander.
1 Sep 1942 USS Washington, with USS Nicholas as an escort, crossed the equator.
14 Sep 1942 USS Washington, with USS Nicholas as an escort, arrived at Tongatabu, Tonga.
15 Sep 1942 USS Washington, with USS Nicholas as an escort, departed Tongatabu, Tonga bound for rendezvous with ships already at sea.
16 Sep 1942 USS Nicholas crossed the 180th meridian and was detached from the USS Washington task group to proceed independently to NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
18 Sep 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia and went alongside tender USS Whitney for repairs to Nicholas’s main fuel feed pumps.
24 Sep 1942 USS Nicholas departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia escorting an oiler bound for Efate, New Hebrides.
26 Sep 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at Efate, New Hebrides and Nicholas departed the same day bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
27 Sep 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
30 Sep 1942 USS Nicholas departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides escorting a transport ship bound for Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
2 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas and transport arrived at Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands where aerial combat was observed overhead. Transport ship began unloading cargo.
3 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas was directed to pick up a downed pilot near the shore of Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. A Japanese “Zero” fighter came within range and Nicholas opened fire with her 5-in/38 anti-aircraft guns, Nicholas’s first shots of the war at a definite enemy target. 2Lt Kenneth D. Frazier, USMC of VMF-223 was rescued from the water, treated briefly by Nicholas’s medical officer, and returned to base on Guadalcanal.
4 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas departed Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands escorting a transport ship bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
8 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas escorting a transport ship arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
9 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia escorting a convoy of United States Army troops bound for Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
13 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas and the convoy of United States Army troops she was escorting arrived at Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. Nicholas fired on incoming Japanese bombers during the day.
14 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas guided another convoy of men and materiel into the Solomon Islands but paused short of Guadalcanal as Japanese ships bombarded Henderson Field.
15 Oct 1942 While retiring from the Solomon Island area, USS Nicholas and the convoy she was escorting came under Japanese dive-bombing attack with no casualties.
16 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas made a depth charge attack on a persistent sound contact with no observable results.
17 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
19 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides escorting a supply ship to Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
22 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands where US Marine ground forces directed a shore bombardment by Nicholas before the ship had to scramble to evade a dive-bombing attack. Nicholas returned to shell a shore-based gun position, firing over 1,200 shells from her main battery throughout the day. Nicholas took aboard 12 wounded Marines for transportation to a Naval Hospital before departing for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
23 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas was redirected from Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides to NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
24 Oct 1942 USS Nicholas was directed to transfer her wounded to other ships and take up screening stations on a convoy heading in the opposite direction.
25 Oct 1942 United States Navy Task Force 64 consisting of USS Washington, USS Atlanta, USS San Francisco, USS Helena, USS Lardner, USS Lansdowne, USS Buchanan, USS Fletcher, USS Walke, USS Benham, USS McCalla, USS Aaron Ward, and USS Laffey bound for Savo, Solomon Islands was joined by USS Nicholas as an additional escort. As Nicholas came alongside Washington to exchange mail, Nicholas struck Washington’s side. The battleship was undamaged but Nicholas sustained hull damage from her anchor being pressed into the ship. Nicholas was able to resume her full duties immediately, however.
30 Oct 1942 USS Washington, USS Lansdowne, and USS Nicholas arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides. Nicholas went alongside USS Argonne for repairs to the damage from the collision with Washington 5 days earlier.
5 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Auckland, New Zealand escorting Army transport ship USAT Maui.
8 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas and USAT Maui arrived at Auckland, New Zealand. Cdr Brown of Nicholas met briefly with the commanding officer of the Naval Operating Base, and Nicholas and Maui put to sea again bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
11 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas and USAT Maui arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
12 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas was assigned to escort troop ship USS Bellatrix on her departure from New Caledonia and then Nicholas was to return to NoumĂ©a.
13 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas arrived off NoumĂ©a harbor, New Caledonia. Nicholas made rendezvous with oiler USS Sabine that Nicholas escorted to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
15 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
16 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides to rendezvous with destroyers USS Gwin and USS Benham who were retiring to Espiritu Santo with battle damage following the Second Battle of Savo Island. When Nicholas met with Gwin, Gwin relayed that Benham sank during the retirement.
17 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas and USS Gwin arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
27 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas and Shaw departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides escorting a convoy bound for Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
29 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas and Shaw arrived off Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands where the convoy they were escorting began unloading men and supplies. Shaw detached and began escort duties to and from Tulagi.
30 Nov 1942 USS Nicholas departed Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands escorting a convoy bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
4 Dec 1942 USS Nicholas and convoy arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
5 Dec 1942 USS Nicholas departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia escorting a convoy bound for Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
8 Dec 1942 USS Nicholas arrived off Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands where the convoy she was escorting began unloading men and supplies.
10 Dec 1942 USS Nicholas departed Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
12 Dec 1942 USS Nicholas arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia where she underwent two days of tender upkeep alongside USS Dixie.
16 Dec 1942 Battleships USS Washington, USS North Carolina, and USS Indiana escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Farragut, and USS Clarke departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia on a patrol cruise around the Coral Sea.
23 Dec 1942 Battleships USS Washington, USS North Carolina, and USS Indiana escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Farragut, and USS Clarke, joined by USS Fanning and Maury, returned to NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
27 Dec 1942 Escort carriers USS Nassau and USS Altamaha escorted by cruisers USS St. Louis and HMS Achilles with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS McCalla, USS McCall, and USS Craven departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
30 Dec 1942 Escort carriers USS Nassau and USS Altamaha escorted by cruisers USS St. Louis and HMS Achilles with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS McCalla, USS McCall, and USS Craven arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
2 Jan 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville, USS St. Louis, USS Helena, USS Honolulu, HMNZS Achilles, USS Columbia, and USS Louisville escorted by destroyers USS Fletcher, USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Lamson, and USS Drayton departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides on a patrol south of Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
8 Jan 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville, USS St. Louis, USS Helena, USS Honolulu, HMNZS Achilles, USS Columbia, and USS Louisville escorted by destroyers USS Fletcher, USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Lamson, and USS Drayton returned to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
9 Jan 1943 USS Nicholas departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides to rendezvous with the damaged USS Minneapolis and escort the cruiser back to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
16 Jan 1943 Commander Destroyer Squadron 5 (DesRon5) Capt Robert P. Briscoe shifted his flag to USS Nicholas. Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS DeHaven, and USS Radford departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
17 Jan 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS DeHaven, and USS Radford arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
19 Jan 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS DeHaven, and USS Radford bombarded Japanese positions on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands at the direction of United States Marine ground forces.
20 Jan 1943 USS Nicholas bombarded Japanese positions on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands at the direction of United States Army ground forces. Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS DeHaven, and USS Radford departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
21 Jan 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS DeHaven, and USS Radford arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
22 Jan 1943 Task Force 67 consisting of cruisers USS Nashville, USS Helena, USS Honolulu, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS DeHaven, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Drayton, USS Lamson, and USS Hughes departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands as a striking force.
23 Jan 1943 After sunset, the Task Force 67 Bombardment Group consisting of cruisers USS Nashville and USS Helena with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS DeHaven, USS O’Bannon, and USS Radford split off from the rest of the force and proceeded toward their objective.
24 Jan 1943 Cruisers USS Nashville and USS Helena with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS DeHaven, USS O’Bannon, and USS Radford made a nighttime bombardment of Vila airstrip, Kolombangara, Solomon Islands, followed by repelling a nighttime Japanese air attack. The destroyers then anchored at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
26 Jan 1943 At Tulagi, USS Nicholas experienced a routine change of command with LtCdr Andrew Hill relieving Cdr William Brown as commanding officer.
1 Feb 1943 USS Nicholas and USS DeHaven screened the landing of Army troops at Verahue on western Guadalcanal. While escorting the transport ships back to base, Nicholas and DeHaven came under a vigorous Japanese dive-bomber attack. DeHaven took three bomb hits including one hit on the forward magazine. DeHaven split in two and sank. Nicholas received minor damage from near miss bomb hits. Nicholas and the transports picked up DeHaven survivors. 146 were killed aboard DeHaven and two aboard Nicholas.
2 Feb 1943 USS Nicholas departed the Guadalcanal area bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides for repairs to her guns.
4 Feb 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides and began repairs alongside tender USS Dixie.
13 Feb 1943 USS Nicholas departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Efate, New Hebrides.
14 Feb 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Efate, New Hebrides.
19 Feb 1943 Cruisers USS Montpelier, USS Cleveland, USS Columbia, and USS Denver along with destroyers USS Fletcher, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, and USS Nicholas departed Efate, New Hebrides bound for the Guadalcanal-Tulagi area in the Solomon Islands.
21 Feb 1943 Cruisers USS Montpelier, USS Cleveland, USS Columbia, and USS Denver along with destroyers USS Fletcher, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, and USS Nicholas arrived off Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, patrolled north of Savo Island, and arrived in Purvis Bay, Tulagi for refueling.
22 Feb 1943 Cruisers USS Montpelier, USS Cleveland, USS Columbia, and USS Denver along with destroyers USS Fletcher, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, and USS Nicholas departed Tulagi bound for the Russell Island Group, Solomon Islands.
4 Mar 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides in the early morning. Before sunset, Nicholas departed in company with USS Fletcher, USS O’Bannon, and USS Radford on a bombardment mission to Munda, New Georgia, Solomon Islands.
6 Mar 1943 Shortly after midnight, destroyers USS Fletcher, USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Radford formed a bombardment line offshore of the Japanese airstrip at Munda, New Georgia, Solomon Islands and shelled the airstrip. By daybreak, the destroyer group had entered Purvis Bay, Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
9 Mar 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
10 Mar 1943 At Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, USS Nicholas transferred from Destroyer Squadron 5 (DesRon5) to Destroyer Squadron 21 (DesRon21), Cdr Francis McInerney commanding.
12 Mar 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, USS Strong, and USS Chevalier of DesRon21 departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for the Tulagi-Guadalcanal area.
14 Mar 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Taylor, USS Radford, and USS Strong detached from the cruiser group to operate as a separate strike group.
16 Mar 1943 Shortly after midnight, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Taylor, USS Radford, and USS Strong formed a bombardment line in Kula Gulf offshore of the Japanese airstrip at Vila, Kolombangara, Solomon Islands and shelled the airstrip. The destroyers rejoined the cruiser group later that day.
22 Mar 1943 Cruiser USS Honolulu with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Radford, USS Taylor, and USS Strong arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
29 Mar 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Strong departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for several days of night patrols of the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) from Tulagi up to Kula Gulf.
6 Apr 1943 USS Helena (St. Louis-class) joined the cruiser group with USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, and USS St. Louis while the cruiser group was on station in the Solomon Islands.
7 Apr 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, USS Helena, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, USS Strong, USS Fletcher, and USS Chevalier departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
10 Apr 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, USS Helena, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, USS Strong, USS Fletcher, and USS Chevalier arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
17 Apr 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Fletcher departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
18 Apr 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Fletcher arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
19 Apr 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Fletcher departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia escorting tender USS Whitney to Sydney, Australia.
23 Apr 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Fletcher and tender USS Whitney arrived at Sydney, Australia.
4 May 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Fletcher and tender USS Whitney departed Sydney, Australia bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
5 May 1943 USS Nicholas detached from escorting USS Whitney to proceed independently to rendezvous with oiler USS Patuxent.
7 May 1943 USS Nicholas rendezvoused with oiler USS Patuxent off New Caledonia and set off for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
9 May 1943 USS Nicholas and oiler USS Patuxent arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
11 May 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, USS Helena, and USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, USS Strong, USS Fletcher, and USS Chevalier departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Kolombangara, Solomon Islands.
13 May 1943 Shortly after midnight, cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, and USS Helena, with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Taylor, USS Strong, and USS Chevalier entered Kula Gulf, Solomon Islands where they conducted a shore bombardment of Japanese positions along both sides of the gulf. Cruiser USS Nashville suffered an explosion inside her No. 3 turret that killed 18 men and injured 17. USS Nicholas and USS Chevalier both suffered gun casualties in their 5-inch gun mounts where, in each case, a hang-fire caused an explosion and fire causing no casualties.
14 May 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Nashville, USS St. Louis, and USS Helena, with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Taylor, USS Strong, and USS Chevalier departed the Solomon Islands and arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides. On arrival, Nicholas and Chevalier went alongside the tender USS Dixie for repairs to their guns.
12 Jun 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Strong departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides escorting oiler USS Monongahela to Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
14 Jun 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Strong and oiler USS Monongahela arrived at Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
17 Jun 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Strong and oiler USS Monongahela departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
19 Jun 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Strong and oiler USS Monongahela arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
20 Jun 1943 Destroyer USS Nicholas escorted transport USS Pinkney from Espiritu Santo to Efate, New Hebrides and escorted stores ship USS Aldebaran from Efate back to Espiritu Santo.
28 Jun 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Helena, USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Strong, USS McCall, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for the Coral Sea.
3 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Helena, USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Strong, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
4 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Helena, USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Strong, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands on patrol of the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) toward Kula Gulf.
5 Jul 1943 The US Northern Landing Group under Colonel Harry Liversedge landed at Rice Anchorage on the northern coast of New Georgia, Solomon Islands. On the same day shortly after midnight, US cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Helena, and USS St. Louis escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Strong, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon entered Kula Gulf to shell Japanese positions on Kolombangara and New Georgia in support of the landings at Rice Anchorage. At the same time, Japanese destroyers Niizuki, Nagatsuki, Yunagi, and Satsuki arrived at the north end of Kula Gulf loaded with 1,300 reinforcement troops and 180 tons of provisions bound for Vila, Kolombangara at the south end of Kula Gulf. Upon the commencement of the American shelling at Bairoka Harbor, New Georgia, the Japanese commander, Commander Kunizo Kanaoka, aborted the mission and ordered a withdrawal. As they turned, Niizuki, Nagatsuki, and Yunagi launched a spread of 14 Type 93 “Long Lance” torpedoes into the gulf. At a range of 22,000 yards (11 nautical miles), one of the torpedoes struck and sank destroyer USS Strong. This is believed to be the longest successful torpedo attack of the war. The Americans never detected the presence of the Japanese destroyers and believed Strong was torpedoed by a submarine.
6 Jul 1943 During Battle of Kula Gulf in the Solomon Islands, US cruisers USS Honolulu, USS Helena, USS St. Louis with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS O'Bannon engaged a Japanese force of destroyers Niizuki, Yunagi, Suzukaze, Tanikaze, Amagiri, Hatsuyuki, Nagatsuki, Satsuki, Mochizuki, Mikazuki and Hamakaze in the early morning darkness. Helena fired on the incoming Japanese convoy at 0157 hours, but the many gun flashes in turn made Helena an attractive target for Japanese gunners. Suzukaze and Tanikaze each launched Type 93 torpedoes. One struck Helena at 0203 hours, followed by two more at 0205 hours. Helena would sink at 0225 hours. Niizuki is sunk by gunfire. Nagatsuki was badly damaged and beached near Bambari Harbor, Kolombangara.
7 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Chevalier departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
8 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Chevalier arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
10 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu and USS St. Louis escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Chevalier departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for the Solomon Islands.
12 Jul 1943 Cruisers USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and HMNZS Leander escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, and USS Chevalier joined with destroyers USS Gwin, USS Woodworth, USS Buchanan, and USS Maury. Together, these ships sailed up the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) toward Kolombangara. Yugure, Yukikaze, Hamakaze, and Kiyonami departed Shortland Islands, Solomon Islands, escorting a troop transport mission involving light cruiser Jintsu to Kolombangara, New Georgia Group, Solomon Islands. The two forces engaged in the Battle of Kolombangara that lasted into the next morning.
13 Jul 1943 Shortly after midnight, cruisers USS Honolulu, USS St. Louis, and HMNZS Leander escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, USS Radford, USS Jenkins, USS Chevalier, USS Gwin, USS Woodworth, USS Buchanan, and USS Maury engaged Japanese cruiser Jintsu and destroyers Yukikaze, Hamakaze, Yugure, Mikazuki, and Kiyonami in New Georgia Sound north of Kolombangara. Japanese Type 93 torpedoes damaged Honolulu, St. Louis, and Leander. Destroyers Woodworth and Buchanan were damaged in a collision. Jintsu was sunk by cruiser gunfire and a torpedo. Destroyer Yukikaze was damaged. Destroyer USS Ralph Talbot went to the aid of USS Gwin, badly damaged by a torpedo, and took aboard 155 officers and men. USS Maury took another 53 officers and men. Ralph Talbot then scuttled Gwin with torpedoes. The Japanese were able to land 1,200 men nevertheless.
15 Jul 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, and USS Jenkins departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands to act as a covering force for the rescue of USS Helena survivors who had made their way to the island of Vella Lavella.
16 Jul 1943 After midnight, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, and USS Jenkins covered the force engaged in recovering 165 USS Helena survivors, 1 Japanese pilot taken as prisoner, 16 Chinese citizens, and 1 Australian coast watcher from the island of Vella Lavella. Upon retiring, Radford came across one of Nicholas's whaleboats left behind after Helena's sinking for the benefit of her survivors still in the water. In the boat were two Japanese sailors from the cruiser Jintsu sunk in the early morning of 13 Jul 1943. Radford took them prisoner.
17 Jul 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, and USS Jenkins departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands and joined cruisers HMAS Australia and HMAS Hobart with destroyers USS Lamson, HMAS Arunta, and HMAS Warramunga for two days of patrols in the shipping lanes between the Solomon Islands and Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
20 Jul 1943 As cruisers HMAS Australia and HMAS Hobart with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Radford, and USS Lamson, HMAS Arunta, and HMAS Warramunga were retiring toward Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, Hobart was struck by a torpedo in her port quarter, reducing her speed to 7 knots.
22 Jul 1943 USS Nicholas and USS Radford, escorting the crippled HMAS Hobart, arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
26 Jul 1943 USS Nicholas departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides escorting a convoy to the Guadalcanal area, Solomon Islands.
31 Jul 1943 USS Nicholas delivered her convoy to Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands and picked up another convoy bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
4 Aug 1943 USS Nicholas and convoy arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
7 Aug 1943 While at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia, Destroyer Squadron 21 (DesRon21), USS Nicholas flagship, experienced a routine change of command with Captain Thomas J. Ryan relieving Captain Francis McInerney as squadron commander. Captain Ryan was a 1923 Medal of Honor recipient and had just completed service as Squadron Commander for DesRon12 where he had been awarded the Navy Cross a month earlier for actions during the landings on Rendova, Solomon Islands. Nicholas departed later that day for Efate, New Hebrides.
9 Aug 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Efate, New Hebrides.
11 Aug 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Chevalier departed Efate, New Hebrides bound for the Guadalcanal area, Solomon Islands.
13 Aug 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Chevalier arrived at Guadalcanal and anchored in Purvis Bay, Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
14 Aug 1943 USS Nicholas departed Tulagi as an escort for troop transports bound for Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands.
15 Aug 1943 USS Nicholas covered troop landings at Barakoma, Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands and then retired to Tulagi.
17 Aug 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Chevalier, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands for a nighttime patrol to the northern reaches of the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) to interdict Japanese shipping.
18 Aug 1943 Battle off Horaniu: Japanese destroyers Sazanami, Hamakaze, Isokaze and Shigure with subchasers Cha-5 and Cha-12 and 3 motor torpedo boats were escorting 13 Diahatsu barges bound for Horaniu on Vella Lavella Islands, Solomon Islands to establish a barge depot to assist with evacuating bypassed Japanese troops on Kolombangara. An American destroyer force of USS Nicholas, USS Chevalier, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor intercepted the Japanese convoy. The barges found refuge in the many coves along Vella Lavella’s north shore but two Japanese subchasers, two motor torpedo boats, and at least one barge were sunk. The Japanese were able to establish a barge depot at Horaniu and barges operating from this depot would eventually evacuate 9,000 Japanese troops from Kolombangara.
19 Aug 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Chevalier, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands for a nighttime patrol to the northern reaches of the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) to interdict Japanese shipping.
20 Aug 1943 Shortly after midnight, while searching the northern coast of Vella Lavella Island for more Japanese landing barges from the convoy encountered the previous night, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Chevalier, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor located and attacked two barges near the shore. One was sunk and the other was damaged. The destroyers then retired at high speed toward Tulagi while they were attacked almost continuously by Japanese aircraft, inflicting no damage.
23 Aug 1943 Shortly after midnight, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Chevalier, USS O’Bannon, USS Taylor, USS Saufley, USS Cony, and USS Renshaw made a patrol through Vella Gulf, Solomon Islands without locating any shipping. Persistent air attacks from Japanese aircraft resulted in no damage.
25 Aug 1943 Shortly after midnight, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Chevalier, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor acted as a covering force for minelayers mining Vella Gulf southwest of Kolombangara, Solomon Islands. [off Wilson Cove; same waters as PT-109 sinking 2 Aug 1943]
26 Aug 1943 Shortly after midnight, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Chevalier, USS O’Bannon, USS Taylor, and USS Pringle made a nighttime patrol through Vella Gulf, Solomon Islands but encountered no shipping.
27 Aug 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon departed the Guadalcanal/Tulagi area escorting a convoy bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
30 Aug 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Chevalier, and USS O’Bannon escorting a convoy arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
31 Aug 1943 USS Nicholas went alongside tender USS Whitney for tender repairs at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
2 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas entered floating drydock ARD-2 at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
4 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas was floated out of floating drydock ARD-2 and went back alongside tender USS Whitney for tender repairs at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
10 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia bound for Milne Bay, New Guinea.
12 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Milne Bay, New Guinea.
13 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas departed Milne Bay, New Guinea escorting two merchant ships bound for Brisbane, Australia.
15 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas transferred her doctor and 2 pharmacist mates to SS Ambrose Pierce to tend to a man stricken with appendicitis.
16 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas and the two merchant ships she was escorting arrived at Townsville, Australia briefly before Nicholas departed again proceeding independently toward Brisbane, Australia.
18 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Brisbane, Australia.
23 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas departed Brisbane, Australia escorting evacuation transport USS Rochambeau bound for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
26 Sep 1943 USS Nicholas escorting USS Rochambeau arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
28 Sep 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Pringle departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia escorting a convoy bound for Guadalcanal/Tulagi area, Solomon Islands.
3 Oct 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands. While at Tulagi, Commander Alvin Chandler assumed command of Destroyer Squadron 21 (DesRon21), hoisting his pennant in Nicholas. Cdr Chandler had recently completed service as commander of DesRon41 during the Battle of Rennell Island. Destroyers Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Chevalier then departed Tulagi on a patrol up the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) to Vella Gulf. North of Kolombangara, the group fired on two Japanese troop barges that burned and sank.
4 Oct 1943 Shortly after midnight, destroyers Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Chevalier fired on a small Japanese gunboat in the New Georgia Sound (The “Slot”) between Kolombangara and Choiseul Islands, Solomon Islands. The gunboat broke in two and sank. The destroyers then returned to Tulagi.
6 Oct 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Saufley, and USS Fletcher departed Tulagi escorting a convoy of LSTs to Barakoma, Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands.
8 Oct 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Saufley, and USS Fletcher covered a convoy of LSTs unloading at Barakoma, Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands.
9 Oct 1943 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Saufley, and USS Fletcher arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
13 Oct 1943 USS Nicholas departed Tulagi as part of an escort for LSTs bound for Vella Lavella Island, Solomon Islands.
14 Oct 1943 USS Nicholas covered a convoy of LSTs unloading at Barakoma, Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands.
15 Oct 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
19 Oct 1943 USS Nicholas departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands as an escort for a convoy bound for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
21 Oct 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides.
23 Oct 1943 USS Nicholas departed Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides bound for Efate, New Hebrides.
24 Oct 1943 USS Nicholas arrived at Efate, New Hebrides and went alongside tender USS Medusa for a period of tender repairs.
31 Oct 1943 Battleships USS Washington, USS Massachusetts, and USS South Dakota escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Fletcher, USS LaVallette, USS Jenkins, and USS Taylor departed Efate New Hebrides to rendezvous with a carrier task group.
2 Nov 1943 Battleships USS Washington, USS Massachusetts, and USS South Dakota escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Fletcher, USS LaVallette, USS Jenkins, and USS Taylor rendezvoused and joined with carriers USS Essex, USS Bunker Hill, and USS Independence with battleships USS Alabama, USS Indiana, USS Tennessee, USS Maryland, and USS Colorado and cruisers USS Portland, USS Mobile, USS Santa Fe, and USS Birmingham with destroyers USS Taylor and USS Radford. Together, this task group steamed toward Nandi Bay, Fiji.
7 Nov 1943 Carriers USS Essex, USS Bunker Hill, and USS Independence with battleships USS Washington, USS Massachusetts, USS South Dakota, USS Alabama, USS Indiana, USS Tennessee, USS Maryland, and USS Colorado with cruisers USS Portland, USS Mobile, USS Santa Fe, and USS Birmingham escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Fletcher, USS LaVallette, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, and USS Radford arrived at Nandi Bay, Fiji.
11 Nov 1943 Battleships USS Washington, USS Indiana, USS South Dakota, and USS Massachusetts escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Fletcher, USS LaVallette, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, and USS Radford departed Nandi Bay, Fiji bound for the Marshall Islands.
15 Nov 1943 USS Nicholas and the ships in her group rendezvoused and joined with carrier Task Force 50 east of the Marshall Islands.
19 Nov 1943 USS Nicholas screened carriers USS Yorktown, USS Lexington (both Essex-class), and USS Cowpens as they launched air strikes against Japanese positions on Makin, Mili, and Jaluit Atolls over 6 consecutive days.
9 Dec 1943 USS Yorktown (Essex-class) escorted by destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Taylor, USS LaVallette, USS Bullard, and USS Kidd entered Pearl Harbor where Yorktown began a month of air training operations in the Hawaiian Islands.
10 Dec 1943 At Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Commander Robert Keith relieved Commander Andrew Hill as commanding officer of USS Nicholas. Later that day, Nicholas departed Pearl Harbor bound for San Francisco, California, United States.
15 Dec 1943 USS Nicholas arrived in San Francisco Bay and entered Mare Island Naval Shipyard to begin an overhaul period.
21 Jan 1944 USS Nicholas departed San Francisco, California bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and USS O’Bannon departed San Diego, California also bound for Pearl Harbor.
22 Jan 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS O’Bannon rendezvoused off the California coast and steamed toward Pearl Harbor together.
26 Jan 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS O’Bannon arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
28 Jan 1944 At Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Admiral Chester Nimitz and Rear Admiral James Kauffman, Commander Destroyers Pacific, came aboard USS Nicholas and presented the ship’s company with a Presidential Unit Citation for their performance in the action at Kula Gulf, 5-6 July 1943.
10 Feb 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS O’Bannon departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii as convoy escorts bound for the Marshall Islands.
17 Feb 1944 In the early morning darkness 400 miles northeast of Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands, radar on USS Nicholas detected a surfaced Japanese submarine. Nicholas attacked and submarine I-175 was sunk (some sources list the submarine as I-11 and others as RO-39, but I-175 remains most likely).
18 Feb 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Kwajalein, Marshall Islands.
25 Feb 1944 Carriers USS Corregidor and USS Coral Sea with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS LaVallette, and USS Taylor departed Kwajalein, Marshall Islands as escorts to bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
3 Mar 1944 Carriers USS Corregidor and USS Coral Sea with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS LaVallette, and USS Taylor arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
11 Mar 1944 Carriers USS Corregidor and USS Coral Sea with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS LaVallette, and USS Ellet departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii bound for the Solomon Islands.
15 Mar 1944 USS Nicholas crossed the equator.
18 Mar 1944 USS Nicholas crossed the 180th meridian.
21 Mar 1944 Carriers USS Corregidor and USS Coral Sea with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS LaVallette, and USS Ellet arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
5 Apr 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Saufley, USS O'Bannon, USS Sigourney, USS Eaton, and USS Fletcher departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for Milne Bay, New Guinea.
9 Apr 1944 USS Nicholas shifted to Cape Sudest, New Guinea and then Oro Bay to go alongside tender USS Dobbin to have additional radio equipment installed for Nicholas to act as a fighter director ship.
18 Apr 1944 USS Nicholas boarded aviation liaison personnel and departed Cape Sudest, New Guinea as part of Task Force 77 bound for the landings at Aitape, New Guinea.
22 Apr 1944 Allied forces landed on Aitape, Australian Territory of New Guinea and Hollandia, Dutch New Guinea during Operation Persecution.
23 Apr 1944 USS Nicholas escorted the transport ships on their withdrawal from the landings at Aitape, New Guinea.
25 Apr 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Buna, New Guinea.
27 Apr 1944 USS Nicholas departed Buna, New Guinea escorting a resupply convoy bound for Aitape and Hollandia, New Guinea.
29 Apr 1944 The resupply convoy escorted by USS Nicholas split with one section taking supplies to Aitape, New Guinea while the remaining ships steamed on toward Hollandia, New Guinea.
30 Apr 1944 The resupply convoy escorted by USS Nicholas arrived at Hollandia, New Guinea. Nicholas departed almost immediately escorting transport ships during their withdrawal.
4 May 1944 USS Nicholas, as an escort for a convoy of transport ships, arrived at Buna, New Guinea.
8 May 1944 USS Nicholas departed Buna, New Guinea as part of an escort for a convoy of transport ships bound for the Russell Islands in the Solomon group.
12 May 1944 USS Nicholas, escorting a convoy of transport ships, arrived at Pavuvu Island, Solomon Islands. Nicholas immediately joined destroyers USS Radford, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, USS Fletcher, and USS LaVallette and departed for NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
14 May 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Radford, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, USS Fletcher, and USS LaVallette arrived at NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia.
24 May 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor departed NoumĂ©a, New Caledonia bound for Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
26 May 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands, picked up mail, and departed for Blanche Harbor, Treasury Islands, Solomon Islands.
27 May 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor arrived at Blanche Harbor, Treasury Islands, Solomon Islands, refueled, and departed bound for Madina on the north shore of New Ireland.
29 May 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor conducted a shore bombardment of the plantation area near Madina, New Ireland that lasted 8 hours with minimal return fire.
30 May 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor arrived at Blanche Harbor, Treasury Islands, Solomon Islands.
1 Jun 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor departed Blanche Harbor, Treasury Islands, Solomon Islands on an emergency sortie to intercept a formation of Japanese ships approaching from the north.
2 Jun 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor arrived at the point of interception and began searching for the formation of Japanese ships approaching from the north.
3 Jun 1944 When the arrival of a formation of Japanese ships failed to materialize, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor assumed an anti-submarine patrol in the lanes between Truk and Rabaul.
5 Jun 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor joined with a submarine hunter-killer group centered around escort carrier USS Hoggatt Bay.
6 Jun 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor entered Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands and returned to join USS Hoggatt Bay.
14 Jun 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor were detached from the submarine hunter-killer group centered around escort carrier USS Hoggatt Bay.
15 Jun 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Hopewell, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor arrived at Blanche Harbor, Treasury Islands, Solomon Islands.
18 Jul 1944 While at Blanche Harbor, Treasury Islands, Solomon Islands, Destroyer Squadron 21 (DesRon21), USS Nicholas flagship, experienced a routine change of command with Captain John K.B. Ginder relieving Captain Alvin Chandler.
3 Aug 1944 After six weeks in and around the Treasury Islands in the Solomon Islands, USS Nicholas departed Blanche Harbor bound for Tulagi, Solomon Islands.
4 Aug 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Tulagi, Solomon Islands and moored alongside tender USS Dixie.
14 Aug 1944 USS Nicholas departed Tulagi, Solomon Islands bound for the Treasury Islands, Solomon Islands.
15 Aug 1944 USS Nicholas refueled at Blanche Harbor, Treasury Islands, Solomon Islands and departed bound for Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands.
17 Aug 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands.
23 Aug 1944 USS Nicholas departed Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands bound for Hollandia, New Guinea.
27 Aug 1944 USS Nicholas departed Hollandia, New Guinea bound for Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands.
28 Aug 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands.
4 Sep 1944 USS Nicholas departed Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands as an escort for LSTs bound for Hollandia, New Guinea.
6 Sep 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Hollandia, New Guinea.
12 Sep 1944 USS Nicholas departed Hollandia, New Guinea escorting a convoy bound for Morotai, Dutch East Indies.
16 Sep 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Morotai, Maluku Islands in support of the landings that took place the previous day.
18 Sep 1944 USS Nicholas departed Morotai, Maluku Islands escorting a convoy bound for Hollandia, New Guinea.
23 Sep 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Hollandia, New Guinea.
25 Sep 1944 USS Nicholas departed Hollandia, New Guinea escorting a convoy bound for Morotai, Maluku Islands.
30 Sep 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Morotai, Maluku Islands.
1 Oct 1944 USS Nicholas departed Morotai, Maluku Islands escorting a convoy bound for Hollandia, New Guinea.
5 Oct 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Hollandia, New Guinea and moored alongside tender USS Dobbin.
18 Oct 1944 USS Nicholas departed Hollandia, New Guinea escorting a convoy bound for Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
23 Oct 1944 USS Nicholas entered Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
24 Oct 1944 USS Nicholas covered landings of reinforcement convoys at Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
25 Oct 1944 USS Nicholas screened Rear Admiral Jesse Oldendorf’s cruiser column as they made their withdrawal following the Battle of Surigao Strait.
29 Oct 1944 After four days of destroyer duties in and around Leyte Gulf, USS Nicholas departed Leyte Gulf as an escort for a column of capital ships bound for Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands.
3 Nov 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands.
8 Nov 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Taylor departed Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands bound for Ulithi in the Caroline Islands.
10 Nov 1944 Destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Taylor arrived at Ulithi in the Caroline Islands.
12 Nov 1944 Cruiser USS St. Louis and destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Taylor departed Ulithi in the Caroline Islands bound for Kossol Roads, Palau.
13 Nov 1944 Shortly after midnight, USS Nicholas made sonar contact with a submarine detected by radar the previous evening. Nicholas made a depth charge attack that sank Japanese Type-B1 submarine I-38. Later, cruiser USS St. Louis and destroyers USS Nicholas and USS Taylor arrived at Kossol Roads, Palau.
14 Nov 1944 Battleship USS Maryland with cruisers USS St. Louis and USS Columbia and destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Taylor, USS Lang, USS McCord, USS Trathen, USS Hazelwood, and USS MacDonough departed Kossol Roads, Palau bound for Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
16 Nov 1944 Battleship USS Maryland with cruisers USS St. Louis and USS Columbia and destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Taylor, USS Lang, USS McCord, USS Trathen, USS Hazelwood, and USS MacDonough arrived at Leyte Gulf, Philippines and joined a task group patrolling the gulf’s entrance.
27 Nov 1944 US Navy Task Group 77.2 consisting of battleships USS Maryland, USS West Virginia, USS Colorado, and USS New Mexico, cruisers USS Denver, USS St. Louis, USS Columbia, USS Minneapolis, and USS Montpelier, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Waller, USS Eaton, USS Cony, USS Mustin, USS Conway, USS Pringle, USS Lang, USS Sigourney, USS Saufley, USS Aulick, USS Renshaw, USS Taylor, USS Edwards, and USS Mugford, tanker USS Caribou, and other patrol craft were patrolling in Leyte Gulf, Philippines when the group came under a concentrated Japanese special air attack from 20 to 30 aircraft. All but two of the Japanese planes dived on the formation in the sustained attack. Submarine chaser SC-744 was sunk and battleship Colorado and cruisers St. Louis and Montpelier were damaged.
28 Nov 1944 As part of the screen for a battleship and cruiser force patrolling Leyte Gulf, Philippines, USS Nicholas was ordered by the Task Group Commander to fire upon a US B-25 Mitchell bomber that was dropping objects near the formation. After firing 76 5-inch anti-aircraft shells, no hits were observed and the bomber departed the area.
29 Nov 1944 US Navy Task Group 77.2 consisting of battleships USS Maryland, USS West Virginia, and USS New Mexico, cruisers USS Denver, USS Columbia, USS Minneapolis, USS Montpelier, and USS Portland, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS Waller, USS Cony, USS Conway, USS Pringle, USS Lang, USS Saufley, USS Aulick, USS Renshaw, USS Edwards, USS Mugford, and USS Connor, and other patrol craft were patrolling in Leyte Gulf, Philippines when the group came under a Japanese air attack where special attack aircraft that damaged Maryland, Saufley, and Aulick.
7 Dec 1944 Shortly after midnight, destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, USS Fletcher, and USS LaVallette made a sweep of Ormoc Bay, Leyte, Philippines. Finding no Japanese shipping, they conducted a shore bombardment along Apali Point on the west side of the bay.
8 Dec 1944 USS Nicholas departed San Pedro Bay, Leyte, Philippines as an escort for a convoy bound for Hollandia, New Guinea.
10 Dec 1944 USS Nicholas detached from the Hollandia bound convoy and steered toward Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands.
15 Dec 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands and moored alongside the tender USS Whitney.
26 Dec 1944 USS Nicholas departed Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands as an escort for two Australian cruisers bound for Kossol Roads, Palau.
28 Dec 1944 USS Nicholas delivered two Australian cruisers to Kossol Roads, Palau and departed immediately for Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
30 Dec 1944 USS Nicholas arrived at San Pedro Bay, Leyte, Philippines.
4 Jan 1945 USS Nicholas departed San Pedro Bay, Leyte as an escort for the invasion forces bound for Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippines.
5 Jan 1945 While escorting the Lingayen Gulf invasion force into the Sulu Sea, destroyers USS Taylor and USS Nicholas attacked a Japanese midget submarine that had fired two torpedoes at the ships. Both ships dropped depth charges and Taylor rammed the submarine causing it to break apart.
21 Jan 1945 After three weeks of screening the carrier support group covering resupply convoys between Mindoro and the Lingayen Gulf landing beaches, destroyer USS Nicholas entered the anchorage at Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, Philippines. Commander of Destroyer Squadron 21, Captain John Ginder, shifted his flag from Nicholas to USS Hopewell.
22 Jan 1945 USS Nicholas put to sea from Mangarin Bay, Mindoro and resumed her duties as a convoy escort.
24 Jan 1945 USS Nicholas was sent to investigate a small boat 200 miles west of Manila. Three Japanese Army soldiers were recovered from an open boat after 20 days adrift. Nicholas transferred the POWs to USS Phoenix.
6 Feb 1945 While at Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, Commander Dennis Lyndon relieved Commander Robert Keith as commanding officer of USS Nicholas. Nicholas then departed Mangarin Bay bound for Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
7 Feb 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
13 Feb 1945 USS Nicholas departed Subic Bay, Luzon bound for Manila Bay, Luzon, Philippines. Nicholas, along with cruisers USS Phoenix and USS Boise and destroyers USS Hopewell, USS Taylor, and USS O'Bannon formed a bombardment group that shelled southern Bataan, Luzon, Philippines. The ships then returned to Subic Bay.
14 Feb 1945 USS Nicholas and her bombardment group repeated their bombardment of southern Bataan, Luzon, Philippines.
15 Feb 1945 USS Nicholas and her bombardment group repeated their bombardment of southern Bataan, Luzon, Philippines in support of the troop landings at Mariveles Harbor on Bataan.
17 Feb 1945 USS Nicholas anchored in Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines. Commander of Destroyer Squadron 21, Captain John Ginder, shifted his flag from USS Hopewell back to Nicholas.
25 Feb 1945 USS Nicholas departed Subic Bay bound for Lingayen Gulf, Luzon.
26 Feb 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippines.
28 Feb 1945 USS Nicholas departed Lingayen Gulf bound for Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
1 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
4 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas departed Subic Bay, Luzon bound for Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, Philippines.
5 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, Philippines.
6 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas departed Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, as an escort for a convoy bound for the landings at Zamboanga, Mindanao, Philippines.
8 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas arrived off Zamboanga on Mindanao and began supporting the preparations for the landings there.
12 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas departed Zamboanga bound for Mangarin Bay, Mindoro.
13 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, refueled, and departed bound for Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
14 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines and went alongside tender USS Dobbin.
24 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas departed Subic Bay, Luzon bound for Cebu, Philippines.
26 Mar 1945 Operation Victor II started with US Amphibious Group 8 in headquarters ship USCG Spencer landing 14,000 men of the American division near Cebu in the Philippines. The transport group consisted of four high speed transports, 20 landing ships tank, 11 landing ships medium, 15 landing ships infantry, and two submarine chasers. The mine-sweeping group comprised eight YMS-class minesweepers and the escort group consisted of the destroyers Flusser, Shaw, Conyngham, Smith and Drayton. Fire support was provided by Task Group 74/3 consisting of the cruisers Phoenix, Boise and the Australian HMAS Hobart with destroyers Fletcher, Nicholas, Taylor Jenkins and Abbot. Air support was provided by the 13th USSAF.
27 Mar 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Mangarin Bay, Mindoro before shifting to Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
15 Apr 1945 Cruiser USS Phoenix with destroyers USS Nicholas and USS O’Bannon conducted a pre-invasion bombardment of Carabao Island at the entrance to Manila Bay, Philippines.
16 Apr 1945 Cruiser USS Phoenix with destroyers USS Nicholas and USS O’Bannon conduct a second day of bombardments of Carabao Island at the entrance to Manila Bay, Philippines prior to the landing of US Army troops.
24 Apr 1945 Cruisers USS Phoenix, HMAS, Hobart, and USS Boise with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, USS Fletcher, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, and HMAS Warramunga departed Subic Bay, Philippines bound for Tarakan Island, Borneo, Dutch East Indies.
27 Apr 1945 Cruisers USS Phoenix, HMAS Hobart, and USS Boise with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, USS Fletcher, USS Jenkins, USS Taylor, and HMAS Warramunga arrived off Tarakan Island, Borneo, Dutch East Indies and began operations in preparations for the island’s invasion.
3 May 1945 Cruisers USS Phoenix and USS Boise with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor departed Tarakan Island, Borneo, Dutch East Indies bound for Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
5 May 1945 Cruisers USS Phoenix and USS Boise with destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor arrived at Subic Bay, Luzon, Philippines.
1 Jun 1945 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor departed Subic Bay, Luzon bound for Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
3 Jun 1945 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O'Bannon, and USS Taylor arrived at San Pedro Bay in Leyte Gulf, Philippines and moored alongside the tender USS Sierra.
5 Jun 1945 USS Nicholas entered floating drydock USS ARD-14 at San Pedro Bay in Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
7 Jun 1945 USS Nicholas was floated out of floating drydock USS ARD-14 and moored alongside tender USS Sierra at San Pedro Bay in Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
15 Jun 1945 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor departed San Pedro Bay, Philippines as escorts for the Third Fleet’s Escort Carrier Task Force bound for Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands.
20 Jun 1945 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor and the carriers they were escorting arrived south of Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands and began refueling operations.
23 Jun 1945 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor were detached from their convoy and routed independently to Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
25 Jun 1945 Destroyers USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor arrived at San Pedro Bay in Leyte Gulf, Philippines.
28 Jun 1945 Cruiser USS Detroit, destroyer USS Nicholas, and 15 other destroyers departed San Pedro Bay in Leyte Gulf, Philippines bound for Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
30 Jun 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands where Commander of Destroyer Squadron 21, Captain John Ginder, in Nicholas detached from duty as squadron commander without relief and departed for the United States.
3 Jul 1945 USS Nicholas departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands as an escort for a replenishment group en route to rendezvous with carrier Task Force 38.
8 Jul 1945 USS Nicholas and the replenishment group she was escorting rendezvoused with carrier Task Force 38 east of Iwo Jima for refueling and replenishment.
20 Jul 1945 USS Nicholas and the replenishment group she was escorting rendezvoused with carrier Task Force 38 northeast of Chichi Jima for refueling and replenishment.
26 Jul 1945 USS Nicholas and the replenishment group she was escorting rendezvoused with carrier Task Force 38 northwest of Chichi Jima for refueling and replenishment.
31 Jul 1945 USS Nicholas and the replenishment group she was escorting rendezvoused with carrier Task Force 38 northwest of Chichi Jima for refueling and replenishment.
3 Aug 1945 USS Nicholas and the replenishment group she was escorting rendezvoused with carrier Task Force 38 west of Iwo Jima for refueling and replenishment.
11 Aug 1945 While at sea, USS Nicholas was detached from the replenishment group and reassigned as an escort in a carrier task group with Task Force 38.
20 Aug 1945 While at sea, Captain Harry Heneberger came aboard USS Nicholas as Commander Destroyer Squadron 21 after having taken command of the squadron at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii a month earlier.
23 Aug 1945 Southeast of Japan, Task Group 30.1 was formed consisting of fleet flagship USS Missouri with USS Nicholas, USS O’Bannon, and USS Taylor as escorts at the specific request of Admiral William Halsey.
25 Aug 1945 USS Nicholas picked up three aircrewmen from a USS Shangri-La TBM Avenger that made a water landing during air operations. Nicholas also took aboard several press representatives transferred from USS Iowa to Nicholas for further transportation.
27 Aug 1945 USS Nicholas rendezvoused with Japanese destroyer Hatuzakura to take aboard Japanese emissaries, interpreters, and harbor pilots. Nicholas then delivered US press and Japanese personnel to USS Missouri, USS Stockham, USS Waldron, HMS Whelp, and USS Gosselin. Missouri and her group then anchored in Sagami Wan just outside Tokyo Bay, Japan.
28 Aug 1945 USS Nicholas delivered Japanese harbor pilots to USS Cumberland Sound, USS Proteus, and USS Neches before returning to the anchorage at Sagami Wan, Japan.
29 Aug 1945 USS Missouri leading USS Iowa and escorted by USS Nicholas entered Tokyo Bay, Japan.
1 Sep 1945 USS Nicholas shifted from Tokyo Bay anchorage to the Customs House Pier in Yokohama, Japan.
2 Sep 1945 Eleven officers and diplomats of the Japanese surrender party crossed the deck of USS Nicholas from the Yokohama Customs House Pier to the USS Lansdowne for transportation to the USS Missouri. Fifty-eight senior US Army officers and 29 senior officers from the Allied nations of China, USSR, Australia, Canada, France, the Netherlands, and New Zealand boarded Nicholas for transportation to Missouri.
7 Sep 1945 USS Nicholas shifted from Tokyo Bay to the coast off Hamamatsu, Japan.
8 Sep 1945 USS Nicholas shifted back to Tokyo Bay, Japan.
10 Sep 1945 USS Nicholas departed Tokyo Bay bound for Ishinomaki Bay, Japan.
11 Sep 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Ishinomaki Bay, Japan.
13 Sep 1945 At Ishinomaki Bay, USS Nicholas received aboard 250 recently freed Allied prisoners of war, 117 American, 85 Dutch, 38 Australian, and 10 British, and brought them to Tokyo Bay, Japan.
1 Oct 1945 Carriers USS Shangri-La, USS Hancock, USS Yorktown (Essex-class), USS Cowpens and cruisers USS Topeka, USS Duluth, and USS Oakland with a destroyer escort that included USS Nicholas departed Tokyo Bay, Japan bound for Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands.
4 Oct 1945 Carriers USS Shangri-La, USS Hancock, USS Yorktown (Essex-class), USS Cowpens and cruisers USS Topeka, USS Duluth, and USS Oakland with a destroyer escort that included USS Nicholas arrived at Buckner Bay (now Nakagusuku Wan), Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands.
6 Oct 1945 Carriers USS Shangri-La, USS Hancock, USS Yorktown (Essex-class), USS Cowpens and cruisers USS Topeka, USS Duluth, and USS Oakland with a destroyer escort that included USS Nicholas departed Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands bound for the United States with thousands of US troops.
13 Oct 1945 USS Nicholas crossed the 180th meridian bound for the United States.
14 Oct 1945 USS Nicholas was ordered to jettison her depth charges. Sixty-three depth charges were jettisoned.
19 Oct 1945 USS Nicholas arrived at Seattle, Washington, United States, her first time in the United States in almost 2 years.
27 Oct 1945 USS Nicholas participated in Navy Day celebrations at Seattle, Washington, United States.
29 Oct 1945 Battleship USS Iowa, cruiser USS Atlanta, and destroyer USS Nicholas departed Seattle, Washington bound for San Pedro, California, United States.
1 Nov 1945 Battleship USS Iowa, cruiser USS Atlanta, and destroyer USS Nicholas arrived at San Pedro, California, United States.
6 Nov 1945 At San Pedro, California, United States, Captain Harry Heneberger, Commander Destroyer Squadron 21, departed USS Nicholas for duty ashore.
7 Nov 1945 At San Pedro, California, United States, USS Nicholas discharged all ordnance to ammunition barges and entered Bethlehem Steel Shipbuilding Yard for her deactivation overhaul.
25 Dec 1945 While USS Nicholas was undergoing a deactivation overhaul at San Pedro, California, United States, Lieutenant Commander Arthur Hamilton relieved Commander Dennis Lyndon as commanding officer.
22 Apr 1946 While USS Nicholas was undergoing a deactivation overhaul at San Pedro, California, United States, Lieutenant Commander John Gardner relieved Lieutenant Commander Arthur Hamilton as commanding officer.
12 Jun 1946 Destroyer Nicholas was decommissioned at San Pedro, California, United States and placed in the reserve fleet.
19 Feb 1951 USS Nicholas was recommissioned at Mare Island Naval Shipyard with Commander Harry Mason in command.
10 Jun 1951 USS Nicholas arrived at Yokosuka, Japan
14 Nov 1951 USS Nicholas departed the Far East where she had screened the carriers of Task Force 77 off the west coast of Korea; conducted Anti-Submarine Warfare exercises between Yokosuka and Okinawa; and patrolled the Taiwan Strait.
3 May 1952 USS Nicholas departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii bound for Korea.
24 Mar 1953 Commander Joseph Eliot assumed command of USS Nicholas.
20 May 1953 USS Nicholas departed the Far East bound for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
14 Jun 1955 Commander John Kaye assumed command of USS Nicholas.
14 Jan 1959 Commander Edmond Kelley assumed command of USS Nicholas.
25 Jun 1960 Commander Robert Hilson assumed command of USS Nicholas.
5 Apr 1962 Commander David Cummins assumed command of USS Nicholas.
18 Jan 1964 Commander Robert Newcomb assumed command of USS Nicholas.
15 Apr 1965 USS Nicholas arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii after a tour in Vietnam.
25 Sep 1965 Commander William Hooffstetter assumed command of USS Nicholas.
1 Oct 1965 USS Nicholas arrived off the coast of Vietnam.
3 Dec 1965 USS Nicholas departed Vietnamese waters bound for patrols in the Taiwan Strait.
17 Mar 1966 USS Nicholas arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
3 Aug 1967 Commander John Henson assumed command of USS Nicholas.
8 Oct 1968 USS Nicholas arrived in the recovery area for the Apollo 7 astronauts.
23 Oct 1968 USS Nicholas departed the recovery area for the Apollo 7 astronauts.
19 Dec 1968 USS Nicholas arrived in the recovery area for the Apollo 8 astronauts.
22 Dec 1968 USS Nicholas departed the recovery area for the Apollo 8 astronauts.
23 Jul 1969 Commander John Hurd assumed command of USS Nicholas.
30 Jan 1970 Destroyer USS Nicholas was decommissioned for the last time at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.




Did you enjoy this article or find this article helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook
 Reddit
 Twitter

Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds




Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
 

Notes:

1. We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

2. For inquiries about military records for members of the World War II armed forces, please see our FAQ.

Search WW2DB
More on Nicholas
Event(s) Participated:
» Guadalcanal Campaign
» Solomon Islands Campaign
» New Guinea-Papua Campaign, Phase 3
» Gilbert Islands Campaign
» Marshall Islands Campaign
» Battle of Morotai
» Philippines Campaign, Phase 1, the Leyte Campaign
» Philippines Campaign, Phase 2
» Okinawa Campaign
» Borneo Campaign
» Preparations for Invasion of Japan
» Japan's Surrender

Destroyer Nicholas (DD-449) Photo Gallery
The hulls of destroyers Nicholas (left) and O’Bannon (right) under construction at the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, United States, 1 Jan 1942. These two ships would be side-by-side for much of their careers.
See all 46 photographs of Destroyer Nicholas (DD-449)


Famous WW2 Quote
"We no longer demand anything, we want war."

Joachim von Ribbentrop, German Foreign Minister, Aug 1939


Support Us

Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 a month will go a long way. Thank you!

Or, please support us by purchasing some WW2DB merchandise at TeeSpring, Thank you!